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Selection: with tag wildfires [at least 200 articles] 

 

Assessing European wild fire vulnerability

  
Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 14 (April 2012), 9452

Abstract

Wild fire vulnerability is a measure of potential socio-economic damage caused by a fire in a specific area. As such it is an important component of long-term fire risk management, helping policy-makers take informed decisions about adequate expenditures for fire prevention and suppression, and to target those regions at highest risk. This paper presents a first approach to assess wild fire vulnerability at the European level. A conservative approach was chosen that assesses the cost of restoring the previous land cover after a potential fire. Based on the CORINE ...

 

Wildfire effects on soil erodibility of woodlands in NW Spain

  
Land Degradation & Development, Vol. 21, No. 2. (March 2010), pp. 75-82, https://doi.org/10.1002/ldr.896

Abstract

Knowledge of soil erodibility following wildfire is of crucial importance for prioritisation of post-fire restoration practices for soil erosion mitigation. The present work therefore aims to determine the effect of wildfire on soil erodibility for common woodlands in Galicia, NW Spain. This is done by comparing selected topsoil properties of 28 pairs of recently wildfire-burned and neighbouring unburned sites on different geologic substrates. The soil properties were selected for their supposed importance in erodibility, and include aggregate size distribution and water ...

 

Risk of post-fire metal mobilization into surface water resources: a review

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 599-600 (December 2017), pp. 1740-1755, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.096

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Forest catchment supply high quality water to a number of communities around the world. [::] Forest fire release sequestered metals from soil organic matter and vegetation. [::] Post-fire erosion rapidly transports these metals to downstream soil and water bodies. [::] Their deposition in the water bodies affects the water quality and aquatic biota. [::] This metal contamination may reach to human being as a consumer. [Abstract] One of the significant economic benefits to communities around the world of having pristine forest catchments is the supply of ...

 

At the nexus of fire, water and society

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (23 May 2016), 20150172, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0172

Abstract

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the effects of fire on the predicted water scarcity and declines in water quality? Drinking water supplies for humans, the emphasis of this exploration, are derived from several land cover types, including forests, grasslands and peatlands, which are vulnerable to fire. In the last two ...

 

A global index for mapping the exposure of water resources to wildfire

  
Forests, Vol. 7, No. 1. (13 January 2016), 22, https://doi.org/10.3390/f7010022

Abstract

Wildfires are keystone components of natural disturbance regimes that maintain ecosystem structure and functions, such as the hydrological cycle, in many parts of the world. Consequently, critical surface freshwater resources can be exposed to post-fire effects disrupting their quantity, quality and regularity. Although well studied at the local scale, the potential extent of these effects has not been examined at the global scale. We take the first step toward a global assessment of the wildfire water risk (WWR) by presenting a ...

 

Building Rothermel fire behaviour fuel models by genetic algorithm optimisation

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 24, No. 3. (2015), 317, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf14097

Abstract

A method to build and calibrate custom fuel models was developed by linking genetic algorithms (GA) to the Rothermel fire spread model. GA randomly generates solutions of fuel model parameters to form an initial population. Solutions are validated against observations of fire rate of spread via a goodness-of-fit metric. The population is selected for its best members, crossed over and mutated within a range of model parameter values, until a satisfactory fitness is reached. We showed that GA improved the performance ...

 

What causes large fires in Southern France

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 294 (April 2013), pp. 76-85, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2012.06.055

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] 0.8% Of fires were larger than 100 ha but accounted for 71% of total burned area. [::] On the whole area, the main cause was arson. [::] Occurrence mainly linked to shrubland population, minor road, fall-spring drought. [::] Burned area linked to shrubland fall–winter rain, summer drought, unemployment. [::] The areas the most affected were located to the East on the Mediterranean coast. [Abstract] In Southern France, where most wildfires occur, the fire size has never exceeded 6744 ha since 1991, whereas ...

 

Modeling the impacts of climate change on forest fire danger in Europe: sectorial results of the PESETA II Project

  

Abstract

This constitutes a sectorial analysis of the PESETA II project of the European Commission Joint Research Center in the area of wildfires. [\n] Wildfires are a serious threat to European forests, and climate is the most important driving factor affecting wildfire potential over time (Flannigan et al., 2000). Wildfires are an environmental, economic and social problem particularly in the southern European countries, where wildfires regularly burn thousands of hectares of forests and other lands. Changes in wildfire regimes may have strong impacts on natural resources and ecosystems stability, ...

 

Human-started wildfires expand the fire niche across the United States

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 11. (14 March 2017), pp. 2946-2951, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1617394114

Abstract

[Significance] Fighting wildfires in the United States costs billions of dollars annually. Public dialog and ongoing research have focused on increasing wildfire risk because of climate warming, overlooking the direct role that people play in igniting wildfires and increasing fire activity. Our analysis of two decades of government agency wildfire records highlights the fundamental role of human ignitions. Human-started wildfires accounted for 84% of all wildfires, tripled the length of the fire season, dominated an area seven times greater than that affected ...

 

Calibration and evaluation of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System for improved wildland fire danger rating in the United Kingdom

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 5. (30 May 2016), pp. 1217-1237, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-1217-2016

Abstract

Wildfires in the United Kingdom (UK) pose a threat to people, infrastructure and the natural environment. During periods of particularly fire-prone weather, wildfires can occur simultaneously across large areas, placing considerable stress upon the resources of fire and rescue services. Fire danger rating systems (FDRSs) attempt to anticipate periods of heightened fire risk, primarily for early-warning and preparedness purposes. The UK FDRS, termed the Met Office Fire Severity Index (MOFSI), is based on the Fire Weather Index (FWI) component of the ...

 

Regional variation in fire weather controls the reported occurrence of Scottish wildfires

  
PeerJ, Vol. 4 (02 November 2016), e2649, https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.2649

Abstract

Fire is widely used as a traditional habitat management tool in Scotland, but wildfires pose a significant and growing threat. The financial costs of fighting wildfires are significant and severe wildfires can have substantial environmental impacts. Due to the intermittent occurrence of severe fire seasons, Scotland, and the UK as a whole, remain somewhat unprepared. Scotland currently lacks any form of Fire Danger Rating system that could inform managers and the Fire and Rescue Services (FRS) of periods when there is ...

 

Risk of large-scale fires in boreal forests of Finland under changing climate

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 1. (21 January 2016), pp. 239-253, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-239-2016

Abstract

The target of this work was to assess the impact of projected climate change on forest-fire activity in Finland with special emphasis on large-scale fires. In addition, we were particularly interested to examine the inter-model variability of the projected change of fire danger. For this purpose, we utilized fire statistics covering the period 1996–2014 and consisting of almost 20 000 forest fires, as well as daily meteorological data from five global climate models under representative concentration pathway RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The ...

 

Multi-variable bias correction: application of forest fire risk in present and future climate in Sweden

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, Vol. 15, No. 9. (11 September 2015), pp. 2037-2057, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-15-2037-2015

Abstract

As the risk of a forest fire is largely influenced by weather, evaluating its tendency under a changing climate becomes important for management and decision making. Currently, biases in climate models make it difficult to realistically estimate the future climate and consequent impact on fire risk. A distribution-based scaling (DBS) approach was developed as a post-processing tool that intends to correct systematic biases in climate modelling outputs. In this study, we used two projections, one driven by historical reanalysis (ERA40) and ...

 

Effects of invasive alien plants on fire regimes

  
BioScience, Vol. 54, No. 7. (2004), pp. 677-688, https://doi.org/10.1641/0006-3568(2004)054[0677:eoiapo]2.0.co;2

Abstract

Plant invasions are widely recognized as significant threats to biodiversity conservation worldwide. One way invasions can affect native ecosystems is by changing fuel properties, which can in turn affect fire behavior and, ultimately, alter fire regime characteristics such as frequency, intensity, extent, type, and seasonality of fire. If the regime changes subsequently promote the dominance of the invaders, then an invasive plant–fire regime cycle can be established. As more ecosystem components and interactions are altered, restoration of preinvasion conditions becomes more ...

 

A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: beyond drought effects

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 148 (January 2017), pp. 42-54, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.11.012

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Different global change factors combine causing unprecedented ecological effects. [::] Much more complex interactions arise when combinations occur together. [::] Drought should be considered when designing and applying management policies. [::] Conserving Mediterranean terrestrial ecosystems is a collective effort. [Abstract] Climate change, alteration of atmospheric composition, land abandonment in some areas and land use intensification in others, wildfires and biological invasions threaten forests, shrublands and pastures all over the world. However, the impacts of the combinations between global change factors are not well understood despite ...

 

Integrating social science research into wildland fire management

  
Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4. (29 July 2014), pp. 381-394, https://doi.org/10.1108/dpm-10-2013-0193

Abstract

Purpose – Social science research is used to support the formulation of natural resource management decisions with accurate and timely information. Due to risk and potential impacts, this is important in wildland fire management. The purpose of this paper is to identify the respondent perceptions of a natural disturbance agent's impact on fire management in Colorado and Wyoming. Design/methodology/approach – The research methodology included a self-administered questionnaire completed by a random sample of respondents in three study locations adjacent to national forests. A quantitative ...

 

Warming and earlier spring increase western U.S. forest wildfire activity

  
Science, Vol. 313, No. 5789. (18 August 2006), pp. 940-943, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1128834

Abstract

Western United States forest wildfire activity is widely thought to have increased in recent decades, yet neither the extent of recent changes nor the degree to which climate may be driving regional changes in wildfire has been systematically documented. Much of the public and scientific discussion of changes in western United States wildfire has focused instead on the effects of 19th- and 20th-century land-use history. We compiled a comprehensive database of large wildfires in western United States forests since 1970 and ...

 

Charcoal as a fire proxy

  
In Tracking Environmental Change Using Lake Sediments: Terrestrial, Algal, and Siliceous Indicators, Vol. 3 (2001), pp. 75-97, https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-47668-1_5

Abstract

[Excerpt: Summary] Charcoal particles preserved in lake sediments provide a means of reconstructing fire history beyond documentary and dendrochrological records. Recent refinements in charcoal analysis and interpretation have greatly improved our ability to use charcoal records as proxy of past fire events and to calculate long-term variations in fire frequency. Standardization has also facilitated synthesis of different researchers’ data. Interpretating charcoal records in terms of the fire location, size, and intensity requires an understanding of the processes that influence charcoal production, transport, and deposition. Studies of charcoal deposition following ...

 

Analyzing spatiotemporal changes in wildfire regime and exposure across a Mediterranean fire-prone area

  
Natural Hazards In Natural Hazards, Vol. 71, No. 3. (2014), pp. 1389-1418, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-013-0951-0

Abstract

We evaluated the spatiotemporal changes in wildfire regime and exposure in a fire-prone Mediterranean area (Sardinia, Italy) in relation to changes in ignition patterns, weather, suppression activities, and land uses. We also used wildfire simulations to identify fine-scale changes in wildfire exposure of important features on the island. Sardinia experienced a sharp reduction in fire number and area burned between the periods 1980–1994 and 1995–2009. Despite this decrease, losses and fatalities from wildfires continue. This suggests that localized areas and seasons ...

 

Analyzing seasonal patterns of wildfire exposure factors in Sardinia, Italy

  
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Vol. 187, No. 1. (2014), pp. 1-20, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-014-4175-x

Abstract

In this paper, we applied landscape scale wildfire simulation modeling to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of wildfire likelihood and intensity in the island of Sardinia (Italy). We also performed wildfire exposure analysis for selected highly valued resources on the island to identify areas characterized by high risk. We observed substantial variation in burn probability, fire size, and flame length among time periods within the fire season, which starts in early June and ends in late September. Peak burn probability and flame ...

 

Modelling long-term fire occurrence factors in Spain by accounting for local variations with geographically weighted regression

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, Vol. 13, No. 2. (11 February 2013), pp. 311-327, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-13-311-2013

Abstract

Humans are responsible for most forest fires in Europe, but anthropogenic factors behind these events are still poorly understood. We tried to identify the driving factors of human-caused fire occurrence in Spain by applying two different statistical approaches. Firstly, assuming stationary processes for the whole country, we created models based on multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression to find factors associated with fire density and fire presence, respectively. Secondly, we used geographically weighted regression (GWR) to better understand and explore ...

 

A new global burned area product for climate assessment of fire impacts

  
Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol. 25, No. 5. (May 2016), pp. 619-629, https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12440

Abstract

[Aim] This paper presents a new global burned area (BA) product developed within the framework of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme, along with a first assessment of its potentials for atmospheric and carbon cycle modelling. [Innovation] Methods are presented for generating a new global BA product, along with a comparison with existing BA products, in terms of BA extension, fire size and shapes and emissions derived from biomass burnings. [Main conclusions] Three years of the global BA product were ...

 

Estimating future burned areas under changing climate in the EU-Mediterranean countries

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 450-451 (April 2013), pp. 209-222, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.02.014

Abstract

The impacts of climate change on forest fires have received increased attention in recent years at both continental and local scales. It is widely recognized that weather plays a key role in extreme fire situations. It is therefore of great interest to analyze projected changes in fire danger under climate change scenarios and to assess the consequent impacts of forest fires. In this study we estimated burned areas in the European Mediterranean (EU-Med) countries under past and future climate conditions. Historical ...

 

Climate-induced variations in global wildfire danger from 1979 to 2013

  
Nature Communications, Vol. 6 (14 July 2015), 7537, https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms8537

Abstract

Climate strongly influences global wildfire activity, and recent wildfire surges may signal fire weather-induced pyrogeographic shifts. Here we use three daily global climate data sets and three fire danger indices to develop a simple annual metric of fire weather season length, and map spatio-temporal trends from 1979 to 2013. We show that fire weather seasons have lengthened across 29.6 million km2 (25.3%) of the Earth’s vegetated surface, resulting in an 18.7% increase in global mean fire weather season length. We also show a ...

 

The interaction of fire and mankind

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (23 May 2016), 20160149, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2016.0149

Abstract

This theme issue is a result of the Royal Society scientific discussion meeting organized by Andrew C. Scott, William G. Chaloner FRS, Claire M. Belcher and Christopher I. Roos at the Royal Society, London, 14–15 September 2015. [\n] Here, the complex interrelationships between fire and mankind that transcend international borders and disciplinary boundaries were discussed. The spectre of climate change highlighted the need to improve our understanding of these relationships across space and time. This meeting examined historical, evolutionary and biophysical tensions ...

 

Constraints on global fire activity vary across a resource gradient

  
Ecology, Vol. 92, No. 1. (2011), pp. 121-132, https://doi.org/10.1890/09-1843.1

Abstract

We provide an empirical, global test of the varying constraints hypothesis, which predicts systematic heterogeneity in the relative importance of biomass resources to burn and atmospheric conditions suitable to burning (weather/climate) across a spatial gradient of long-term resource availability. Analyses were based on relationships between monthly global wildfire activity, soil moisture, and mid-tropospheric circulation data from 2001 to 2007, synthesized across a gradient of long-term averages in resources (net primary productivity), annual temperature, and terrestrial biome.We demonstrate support for the varying ...

 

A review of the main driving factors of forest fire ignition over Europe

  
Environmental Management, Vol. 51, No. 3. (2013), pp. 651-662, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00267-012-9961-z

Abstract

Knowledge of the causes of forest fires, and of the main driving factors of ignition, is an indispensable step towards effective fire prevention policies. This study analyses the factors driving forest fire ignition in the Mediterranean region including the most common human and environmental factors used for modelling in the European context. Fire ignition factors are compared to spatial and temporal variations of fire occurrence in the region, then are compared to results obtained in other areas of the world, with ...

 

Living with wildfires: what science can tell us - A contribution to the science-policy dialogue

  
Vol. 15 (2009)
edited by Yves Birot

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] Contrary to other natural hazards such as earthquakes or windstorms, wildfires are certainly among the most predictable ones. Therefore, it is a phenomenon which, in principle, should leave modern societies some degrees of freedom and margins of manoeuvre for implementing efficient counteracting strategies. However, this opportunity has not been properly used. Over the last decades, wildfires have proven to be a subject of growing concern for the Mediterranean Region. Woodlands, rangelands, maquis and garrigues in rural areas or at the interface with urban areas still ...

 

Involve social scientists in defining the Anthropocene

  
Nature, Vol. 540, No. 7632. (7 December 2016), pp. 192-193, https://doi.org/10.1038/540192a

Abstract

The causes of Earth's transition are human and social, write Erle Ellis and colleagues, so scholars from those disciplines must be included in its formalization. ...

 

Air pollution over European Russia and Ukraine under the hot summer conditions of 2010

  
Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, Vol. 47, No. 6. (2011), pp. 699-707, https://doi.org/10.1134/S0001433811060168

Abstract

Variations in the concentrations of both primary (PM10, CO, and NOx) and secondary (ozone) pollutants in the atmosphere over the Moscow and Kirov regions, Kiev, and Crimea under the conditions of the anomalously hot summer of 2011 are given and analyzed. The concentrations of ozone, PM10, CO, and NOx in the atmosphere over the Moscow region exceeded their maximum permissible levels almost continuously from late July to late August 2010. The highest level of atmospheric pollution was observed on August 4–9, ...

 

The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth

  
Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 38, No. 12. (2011), pp. 2223-2236, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02595.x

Abstract

Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but ‘natural’ (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. ...

 

Analysis of daily, monthly, and annual burned area using the fourth-generation global fire emissions database (GFED4)

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 118, No. 1. (2013), pp. 317-328, https://doi.org/10.1002/jgrg.20042

Abstract

We describe the fourth generation of the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED4) burned area data set, which provides global monthly burned area at 0.25°  spatial resolution from mid-1995 through the present and daily burned area for the time series extending back to August 2000. We produced the full data set by combining 500 m MODIS burned area maps with active fire data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) family of ...

 

Sensitivity of burned area in Europe to climate change, atmospheric CO2 levels, and demography: a comparison of two fire-vegetation models

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 120, No. 11. (1 November 2015), pp. 2256-2272, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015jg003036

Abstract

Global environmental changes and human activity influence wildland fires worldwide, but the relative importance of the individual factors varies regionally and their interplay can be difficult to disentangle. Here we evaluate projected future changes in burned area at the European and sub-European scale, and we investigate uncertainties in the relative importance of the determining factors. We simulated future burned area with LPJ-GUESS-SIMFIRE, a patch-dynamic global vegetation model with a semi-empirical fire model, and LPJmL-SPITFIRE, a dynamic global vegetation model with a ...

 

Driving forces of global wildfires over the past millennium and the forthcoming century

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 107, No. 45. (09 November 2010), pp. 19167-19170, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1003669107

Abstract

Recent bursts in the incidence of large wildfires worldwide have raised concerns about the influence climate change and humans might have on future fire activity. Comparatively little is known, however, about the relative importance of these factors in shaping global fire history. Here we use fire and climate modeling, combined with land cover and population estimates, to gain a better understanding of the forces driving global fire trends. Our model successfully reproduces global fire activity record over the last millennium and ...

 

How drought-induced forest die-off alters microclimate and increases fuel loadings and fire potentials

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 25, No. 8. (2016), 819, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf15028

Abstract

Forest die-offs associated with drought and heat have recently occurred across the globe, raising concern that associated changes in fuels and microclimate could link initial die-off disturbance to subsequent fire disturbance. Despite widespread concern, little empirical data exist. Following forest die-off in the Northern Jarrah Forest, south-western Australia, we quantified fuel dynamics and associated microclimate for die-off and control plots. Sixteen months post die-off, die-off plots had significantly increased 1-h fuels (11.8 vs 9.8 tonnes ha–1) but not larger fuel classes ...

 

Hydrological impact of forest fires and climate change in a Mediterranean basin

  
Natural Hazards, Vol. 66, No. 2. (2013), pp. 609-628, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-012-0503-z

Abstract

Forest fire can modify and accelerate the hydrological response of Mediterranean basins submitted to intense rainfall: during the years following a fire, the effects on the hydrological response may be similar to those produced by the growth of impervious areas. Moreover, climate change and global warming in Mediterranean areas can imply consequences on both flash flood and fire hazards, by amplifying these phenomena. Based on historical events and post-fire experience, a methodology to interpret the impacts of forest fire in terms ...

 

Climate change impacts and adaptation in forest management: a review

  
Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 72, No. 2. (2015), pp. 145-167, https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-014-0446-5

Abstract

[Key message] Adaptation of forest management to climate change requires an understanding of the effects of climate on forests, industries and communities; prediction of how these effects might change over time; and incorporation of this knowledge into management decisions. This requires multiple forms of knowledge and new approaches to forest management decisions. Partnerships that integrate researchers from multiple disciplines with forest managers and local actors can build a shared understanding of future challenges and facilitate improved decision making in the face of ...

 

Health impacts of wildfires

  

Abstract

[Introduction] Wildfires are common globally. Although there has been considerable work done on the health effects of wildfires in countries such as the USA where they occur frequently there has been relatively little work to investigate health effects in the United Kingdom. Climate change may increase the risk of increasing wildfire frequency, therefore there is an urgent need to further understand the health effects and public awareness of wildfires. This study was designed to review current evidence about the health effects of ...

 

Health impacts of fire smoke inhalation

  
Inhalation Toxicology, Vol. 20, No. 8. (1 January 2008), pp. 761-766, https://doi.org/10.1080/08958370801975311

Abstract

Most fatalities from fires are not due to burns, but are a result of inhalation of toxic gases produced during combustion. Fire produces a complex toxic environment involving flame, heat, oxygen depletion, smoke and toxic gases. As a wide variety of synthetic materials is used in buildings (insulation, furniture, carpeting, and decorative items) the potential for severe health impacts from inhalation of products of combustion during building fires is continuously increasing. In forest fires the burning of biomass leads to smoke ...

 

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: science overview and knowledge needs

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 317 (April 2014), pp. 1-8, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.12.014

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Wildland fires have influenced the global carbon cycle for ∼420 million years. [::] Fire moves carbon among terrestrial and atmospheric pools. [::] Fires emit carbon dioxide (CO2), black carbon and other aerosols. [::] Climate change alters fire regimes, potentially increasing wildfire emissions. [::] The global carbon cycle accounting should include wildland fire emissions. [Abstract] Wildland fires have influenced the global carbon cycle for ∼420 million years of Earth history, interacting with climate to define vegetation characteristics and distributions, trigger abrupt ecosystem shifts, and move carbon among ...

 

Short-term effects of particulate matter on mortality during forest fires in Southern Europe: results of the MED-PARTICLES Project

  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 72, No. 5. (01 May 2015), pp. 323-329, https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2014-102459

Abstract

[Background] An association between occurrence of wildfires and mortality in the exposed population has been observed in several studies with controversial results for cause-specific mortality. In the Mediterranean area, forest fires usually occur during spring–summer, they overlap with Saharan outbreaks, are associated with increased temperature and their health effects are probably due to an increase in particulate matter. [Aim and methods] We analysed the effects of wildfires and particulate matter (PM10) on mortality in 10 southern European cities in Spain, France, Italy ...

 

Adapting to climate change

  
In Climate Change and United States Forests, Vol. 57 (2014), pp. 183-222, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7515-2_8

Abstract

Federal agencies have led the development of adaptation principles and tools in forest ecosystems over the past decade. Successful adaptation efforts generally require organizations to: (1) develop science-management partnerships, (2) provide education on climate change science, (3) provide a toolkit of methods and processes for vulnerability assessment and adaptation, (4) use multiple models to generate projections of climate change effects, (5) incorporate risk and uncertainty, (6) integrate with multiple management objectives, (7) prioritize no-regrets decision making, (8) support flexibility and adaptive ...

 

Evaluation of the Canadian fire weather index system in an eastern Mediterranean environment

  
Meteorological Applications, Vol. 18, No. 1. (March 2011), pp. 83-93, https://doi.org/10.1002/met.214

Abstract

The Fire Weather Index module of the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS) was evaluated during two consecutive fire seasons in the Mediterranean environment of Crete, Greece. The Duff Moisture Code (DMC), the Drought Code (DC), the Buildup Index (BUI) and the Fire Weather Index (FWI) were highly correlated to fire occurrence but only moderately to area burned. Logistic regression was applied in order to classify the FWI values into fire danger classes appropriate for the Mediterranean environments, as follows: ...

 

Current methods to assess fire danger potential

  
In Wildland Fire Danger Estimation and Mapping, Vol. 4 (1 September 2003), pp. 21-61, https://doi.org/10.1142/9789812791177_0002

Abstract

Abstract A review of the main operational systems for fire risk/danger rating is presented in this chapter. The systems included in the revision are a European proposal based on the Fire Potential Index and a structural risk index, the US National Fire Danger Rating System, the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System, the Australian and the New Zealand systems. The basis and different components of these danger rating methods are presented and commented. ...

 

The 2002 glossary of forest fire management terms

  
(2002)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Preface] This glossary gives definitions of terms most commonly used in Canada in the field of forest fire management. It also includes terms that are commonly found in forest fire management literature, although not all of these terms are widely used in field operations at this time. The main purpose of the glossary is to provide a means of achieving a common understanding of the vocabulary used in forest fire management and to promote the use of standard terminology among forest fire agencies across the ...

 

Risk of multiple interacting tipping points should encourage rapid CO2 emission reduction

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 6, No. 5. (21 March 2016), pp. 520-525, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2964

Abstract

Evidence suggests that several elements of the climate system could be tipped into a different state by global warming, causing irreversible economic damages. To address their policy implications, we incorporated five interacting climate tipping points into a stochastic-dynamic integrated assessment model, calibrating their likelihoods and interactions on results from an existing expert elicitation. Here we show that combining realistic assumptions about policymakers’ preferences under uncertainty, with the prospect of multiple future interacting climate tipping points, increases the present social cost of ...

 

Does increased forest protection correspond to higher fire severity in frequent-fire forests of the western United States?

  
Ecosphere, Vol. 7, No. 10. (October 2016), e01492, https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1492

Abstract

There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly after decades of fire suppression. This view has led to recent proposals—both administrative and legislative—to reduce or eliminate forest protections and increase some forms of logging based on the belief that ...

 

The status of our scientific understanding of lodgepole pine and mountain pine beetles - A focus on forest ecology and fire behavior

  
Global Fire Initiative technical report, Vol. 2008, No. 2. (2008), pp. 1-13

Abstract

A synthesis of our current knowledge about the effects of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on lodgepole pine forests and fire behavior, with a geographic focus on Colorado and southern Wyoming. [Excerpt: Implications for future forests] Models for predicting future climates have progressed dramatically in recent years, but their accuracy is questionable for planning purposes, particularly at local levels. Nonetheless, model predictions suggest significant alterations in climate from past observed patterns. These predictions are supported by recent climate events that themselves had largely been predicted several years ago. Therefore, the potential ...

 

The National Fire-Danger Rating System: basic equations

  
Vol. PSW-82 (1985)

Abstract

Updating the National Fire-Danger Rating System (NFDRS) was completed in 1977, and operational use of it was begun the next year. The System provides a guide to wildfire control and suppression by its indexes that measure the relative potential of initiating fires. Such fires do not behave erratically–they spread without spotting through continuous ground fuels. Estimates of fire potential have a basis in the mathematical models used for fire behavior. The fire manager must select the fuel model that best represents ...

 

Assessment of fire danger conditions

  
Australian Forestry, Vol. 13, No. 1. (1 January 1949), pp. 53-62, https://doi.org/10.1080/00049158.1949.10675766

Abstract

SUMMARY At the Yallourn and Kiewa undertakings of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria, a simple fire danger meter is being used to assist the fire protection staff in their judgment of fire danger conditions in the surrounding forests. On this meter, the fire danger rating is arrived at by adding a burning index, based on weather conditions on the day, to a season index, based on past weather history for the season. The formulae for calculating these indices are empirical, ...

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