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Selection: with tag water-quality [22 articles] 

 

Risk of post-fire metal mobilization into surface water resources: a review

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 599-600 (December 2017), pp. 1740-1755, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.096

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Forest catchment supply high quality water to a number of communities around the world. [::] Forest fire release sequestered metals from soil organic matter and vegetation. [::] Post-fire erosion rapidly transports these metals to downstream soil and water bodies. [::] Their deposition in the water bodies affects the water quality and aquatic biota. [::] This metal contamination may reach to human being as a consumer. [Abstract] One of the significant economic benefits to communities around the world of having pristine forest catchments is the supply of ...

 

At the nexus of fire, water and society

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (23 May 2016), 20150172, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0172

Abstract

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the effects of fire on the predicted water scarcity and declines in water quality? Drinking water supplies for humans, the emphasis of this exploration, are derived from several land cover types, including forests, grasslands and peatlands, which are vulnerable to fire. In the last two ...

 

A global index for mapping the exposure of water resources to wildfire

  
Forests, Vol. 7, No. 1. (13 January 2016), 22, https://doi.org/10.3390/f7010022

Abstract

Wildfires are keystone components of natural disturbance regimes that maintain ecosystem structure and functions, such as the hydrological cycle, in many parts of the world. Consequently, critical surface freshwater resources can be exposed to post-fire effects disrupting their quantity, quality and regularity. Although well studied at the local scale, the potential extent of these effects has not been examined at the global scale. We take the first step toward a global assessment of the wildfire water risk (WWR) by presenting a ...

 

Health impacts of wildfires

  

Abstract

[Introduction] Wildfires are common globally. Although there has been considerable work done on the health effects of wildfires in countries such as the USA where they occur frequently there has been relatively little work to investigate health effects in the United Kingdom. Climate change may increase the risk of increasing wildfire frequency, therefore there is an urgent need to further understand the health effects and public awareness of wildfires. This study was designed to review current evidence about the health effects of ...

 

A multi-criteria optimisation of scenarios for the protection of water resources in Europe: support to the EU blueprint to safeguard Europe's waters

  

Abstract

A modelling environment has been developed to assess optimum combinations of water retention measures, water savings measures, and nutrient reduction measures for continental Europe. This modelling environment consists of linking the agricultural CAPRI model, the LUMP land use model, the LISFLOOD water quantity model, the EPIC water quality model, the LISQUAL combined water quantity, quality and hydro-economic model, and a multi-criteria optimisation routine. Simulations have been carried out to assess the effects of water retention measures, water savings measures, and nutrient ...

 

The charcoal vision: a win–win–win scenario for simultaneously producing bioenergy, permanently sequestering carbon, while improving soil and water quality

  
Agronomy Journal, Vol. 100, No. 1. (2008), 178, https://doi.org/10.2134/agrojnl2007.0161

Abstract

Processing biomass through a distributed network of fast pyrolyzers may be a sustainable platform for producing energy from biomass. Fast pyrolyzers thermally transform biomass into bio-oil, syngas, and charcoal. The syngas could provide the energy needs of the pyrolyzer. Bio-oil is an energy raw material (∼17 MJ kg−1) that can be burned to generate heat or shipped to a refinery for processing into transportation fuels. Charcoal could also be used to generate energy; however, application of the charcoal co-product to soils ...

 

Estimating watershed degradation over the last century and its impact on water-treatment costs for the world’s large cities

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 32. (09 August 2016), pp. 9117-9122, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1605354113

Abstract

[Significance] Urban water-treatment costs depend on the water quality at the city’s source, which in turn depends on the land use in the source watersheds. Here, we show that globally urban source watershed degradation is widespread, with 9 in 10 cities losing significant amounts of natural land cover in their source watersheds to agriculture and development. This watershed degradation has impacted the cost of water treatment for about one in three large cities globally, increasing those costs by about half. This increase ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 38

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   vinca-spp   vineyards   violin   viral-disease   virgin-forest   virola-koschnyi   viscum-album   visual-assessment   visual-interpretation   visual-notation   visualization   vitality   vitex-keniensis   vitis-spp   vochysia-divergens   vochysia-ferruginea   vochysia-guatemalensis   volatiles   volcanic-eruptions   volunteered-geographic-information   vulnerability   walnut   walnut-leaf   warming   washingtonia-filifera   washingtonia-robusta   water   water-balance   water-erosion   water-impoundment   water-potential   water-quality   water-reservoir-management   water-reservoir-network   water-resources   water-resources-management   water-scarcity   water-security   water-storage   water-stress   water-use-efficiency   waterlogging   waves-energy   web-and-information-technologies   web-coverage-services   web-map-services   web-processing-services   web-services   weibull-distribution   weighting   wepp   west-antartica   western-alps   western-asia   western-europe   western-mediterranean   westringia-fruticosa   wetland-investigations   wetlands   wheat   wicked-problem   wide-scale   wide-scale-transdisciplinary-modelling-for-environment   widespread-plant-species   wiesa   wiki-communication   wild-service-tree   wilderness   wildfires   wilt   wind   wind-damage   wind-energy   wind-model   windstorm   windthrow   wine-barrel   winter-robustness   wisteria-sinensis   wollemia-nobilis   wood-instrument   wood-market   wood-pellet   wood-production   wood-properties   wood-shreds   wood-structure   wood-technology   wooden-artifact   wooden-foundation   woodland   woods   woodworm   woody-species   word-processor-errors   work-life-balance   workflow   workflow-dependencies   worldclim  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

A thirsty world

  
Science, Vol. 313, No. 5790. (2006), pp. 1067-1067, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.313.5790.1067

Abstract

[Excerpt] The search for fresh water—to drink, to bathe in, to irrigate crops—is a problem as old as civilization. Across the ages, cities have thrived where the supply is abundant and collapsed in the face of drought. Remarkably, despite the technological progress characterizing the modern era and the fact that most of Earth's surface is covered by oceans, the availability of fresh water remains a pressing concern throughout the world. In this special section, we highlight some of the diverse contemporary ...

 

Human influences on nitrogen removal in lakes

  
Science, Vol. 342, No. 6155. (2013), pp. 247-250, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1242575

Abstract

The negative consequences of increased loading of nitrogen and phosphorus into aquatic ecosystems are well known. Management strategies aimed at reducing the sources of these excess nutrients, such as fertilizer runoff or sewage outflows, can largely mitigate the increases in nitrogen and phosphorus levels; however, it is unclear if these strategies are influencing other spects of these ecosystems. Using a global lake data set, Finlay et al. (p. 247; see the Perspective by Bernhardt) found that reducing phosphorus inputs reduced a ...

 

Planted forests and water in perspective

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 251, No. 1-2. (October 2007), pp. 1-9, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2007.06.010

Abstract

Afforestation is increasingly considered as a land use activity that threatens water resources security. At the same time, it is advocated for a wide range of other water-related benefits. We review the contributions to this special issue and the wider literature, intended as a contribution towards a framework for predicting the impact on water resources and other water-related issues of afforestation in agricultural landscapes. Current evidence suggests that afforestation will typically reduce local average water yield as well as low flows. ...

 

Water-quality impacts from climate-induced forest die-off

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 3. (28 October 2012), pp. 218-222, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1724

Abstract

Increased ecosystem susceptibility to pests and other stressors has been attributed to climate change, resulting in unprecedented tree mortality from insect infestations. In turn, large-scale tree die-off alters physical and biogeochemical processes, such as organic matter decay and hydrologic flow paths, that could enhance leaching of natural organic matter to soil and surface waters and increase potential formation of harmful drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Whereas previous studies have investigated water-quantity alterations due to climate-induced, forest die-off, impacts on water quality ...

 

Erosion and suspended sediment transfer in river catchments: environmental controls, processes and problems

  
Geography, Vol. 82, No. 4. (1997), pp. 353-376

Abstract

This article discusses some of the environmental problems caused by soil erosion and suspended sediment transfer in a range of environments across the world. The principal controls on water erosion and global patterns of sediment yield are briefly outlined and a series of examples are used to highlight the nature of fine sediment transfer and storage in river catchments. Land use change may trigger large increases in soil erosion and declines in soil fertility. Major economic losses may follow as downstream ...

 

Ecological perspective on water quality goals

  
Environmental Management In Environmental Management, Vol. 5, No. 1. (1 January 1981), pp. 55-68, https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01866609

Abstract

The central assumption of nonpoint source pollution control efforts in agricultural watersheds is that traditional erosion control programs are sufficient to insure high quality water resources. We outline the inadequacies of that assumption, especially as they relate to the goal of attaining ecological integrity. The declining biotic integrity of our water resources over the past two decades is not exclusively due to water quality (physical/chemical) degradation. Improvement in many aspects of the quality of our water resources must be approached with ...

 

Methods to prioritize placement of riparian buffers for improved water quality

  
Agroforestry Systems, Vol. 75, No. 1. (2009), pp. 17-25, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10457-008-9134-5

Abstract

Agroforestry buffers in riparian zones can improve stream water quality, provided they intercept and remove contaminants from surface runoff and/or shallow groundwater. Soils, topography, surficial geology, and hydrology determine the capability of forest buffers to intercept and treat these flows. This paper describes two landscape analysis techniques for identifying and mapping locations where agroforestry buffers can effectively improve water quality. One technique employs soil survey information to rank soil map units for how effectively a buffer, when sited on them, would ...

 

Human excreta management: human excreta as an important base of sustainable agriculture

  
In Proceedings of the 4th Multidisciplinary Academic Conference (2015)

Abstract

Human excreta are considered as a waste which must be clear away as fast as possible by water. However human excreta are essential components of material and energy flows of ecosystems. The paper draws attention how much valuable material is lost when regarding human excreta as waste. For evaluation of the nutrient quantity in the human excreta the nitrogen and phosphorus loading caused by purified sewage emission, the quantity of fertilizer used for enhance soil productivity, the nitrogen and phosphorus balance ...

References

  1. Gotass in F. Tanguay, 1990. Petit manuel d’auto-construction. Mortagne, Quebec.
  2. National Institute for Environment, 2013. Magyarország környezeti állapota (Environmental state of Hungary). Budapest: National Institute for Environment (NeKI).
  3. Toilettes Du Monde, 2009. Guide toilettes seches, Assaimissement Ecologique et solidarite. Nyons, France.
  4. Hungarian Central Statistical Office, 2014. Környezeti helyzetkép 2013 (Environmental situation in Hungary, 2013). Budapest.
  5. Vegh, L., Szam, D., Hetesi,Zs., 2008. Utolsó kísérlet – Híradás
 

Rethinking the contribution of drained and undrained grasslands to sediment-related water quality problems

  
Journal of Environment Quality, Vol. 37, No. 3. (1 May 2008), pp. 906-914, https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2007.0457

Abstract

Grass vegetation has been recommended for use in the prevention and control of soil erosion because of its dense sward characteristics and stabilizing effect on the soil. A general assumption is that grassland environments suffer from minimal soil erosion and therefore present little threat to the water quality of surface waters in terms of sediment and sorbed contaminant pollution. Our data question this assumption, reporting results from one hydrological year of observations on a field-experiment monitoring overland flow, drain flow, fluxes ...

 

Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

  
Science of The Total Environment (June 2013), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.05.057

Abstract

The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of ‘good ecological status’. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the ...

 

Wildfire effects on water quality in forest catchments: a review with implications for water supply

  
Journal of Hydrology, Vol. 396, No. 1-2. (04 January 2011), pp. 170-192, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2010.10.043

Abstract

Wildfires burn extensive forest areas around the world each year. In many locations, fire-prone forest catchments are utilised for the supply of potable water to small communities up to large cities. Following wildfire, increased erosion rates and changes to runoff generation and pollutant sources may greatly increase fluxes of sediment, nutrients and other water quality constituents, potentially contaminating water supplies. Most research to date has focused on suspended sediment exports and concentrations after wildfire. Reported first year post-fire suspended sediment exports ...

 

Discriminating fine sediment sources and the application of sediment tracers in burned catchments: a review

  
Hydrological Processes, Vol. 27, No. 6. (15 March 2013), pp. 943-958, https://doi.org/10.1002/hyp.9537

Abstract

Wildfire can cause substantial changes to runoff, erosion and downstream sediment delivery processes. In response to these disturbance effects, the main sources of sediment transported within burned catchments may also change. Sediment tracing offers an approach to determine the proportional contributions of fine sediment (typically <63 µm) from burned catchment sources. In this paper, we review the application of various sediment tracers to discriminate fine sediment sources following wildfire. Fallout radionuclides provide the most effective tracers for discriminating hillslope surface and sub-surface ...

 

Effects of wildfire on soils and watershed processes

  
Journal of Forestry, Vol. 102, No. 6. (September 2004), pp. 16-20

Abstract

Wildfire can cause water repellency and consume plant canopy, surface plants and litter, and structure-enhancing organics within soil. Changes in soil moisture, structure, and infiltration can accelerate surface runoff, erosion, sediment transport, and deposition. Intense rainfall and some soil and terrain conditions can contribute to overland runoff and in-channel debris torrents. Mineralization of organic matter, interruption of root uptake, and loss of shade can further impact water quality by increasing stream temperatures and nutrient concentrations. Where wildfires are unnaturally large and ...

 

The legacy of the Three Gorges dam

  
Science, Vol. 333, No. 6044. (12 August 2011), pp. 817-817, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.333.6044.817

Abstract

Scientists predicted that when the world's largest hydropower project came online in 2003, it would be an environmental bane. The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River has unfortunately lived up to expectations. For that reason China is embarking on a 10-year mitigation effort that sources say will cost $26.45 billion. The travails of the Three Gorges Dam are a cautionary tale for Laos and its Southeast Asian neighbors as they wrestle with the pros and cons of damming the lower ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/water-quality

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.