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Selection: with tag united-states [100 articles] 

 

Fears rise for US climate report as Trump officials take reins

  
Nature, Vol. 548, No. 7665. (1 August 2017), pp. 15-16, https://doi.org/10.1038/548015a

Abstract

Officials at the US Environmental Protection Agency are consulting global-warming sceptics as they weigh up a technical review. ...

 

Climate-driven tree mortality: insights from the piñon pine die-off in the United States

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 200, No. 2. (October 2013), pp. 301-303, https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.12464

Abstract

The global climate is changing, and a range of negative effects on plants has already been observed and will likely continue into the future. One of the most apparent consequences of climate change is widespread tree mortality (Fig. 1). Extensive tree die-offs resulting from recent climate change have been documented across a range of forest types on all forested continents (Allen et al., 2010). The exact physiological mechanisms causing this mortality are not yet well understood (e.g. McDowell, 2011), but they ...

 

US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 16. (21 April 2015), pp. 5081-5086, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1418034112

Abstract

[Significance] The United States has one of the oldest and most sophisticated systems of protected areas in the world. Given the large amount of information on the country’s biodiversity, and the potential resources available, one might expect it to do well in protecting biodiversity. We find that it does not. The United States protected areas do not adequately cover the country’s unique species. To improve the coverage, we map priorities for multiple taxa and recommend specific areas for immediate conservation attention. These ...

 

Combining multiple classifiers: an application using spatial and remotely sensed information for land cover type mapping

  
Remote Sensing of Environment, Vol. 74, No. 3. (December 2000), pp. 545-556, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0034-4257(00)00145-0

Abstract

This article discusses two new methods for increasing the accuracy of classifiers used land cover mapping. The first method, called the product rule, is a simple and general method of combining two or more classification rules as a single rule. Stacked regression methods of combining classification rules are discussed and compared to the product rule. The second method of increasing classifier accuracy is a simple nonparametric classifier that uses spatial information for classification. Two data sets used for land cover mapping ...

 

Divergence of species responses to climate change

  
Science Advances, Vol. 3, No. 5. (17 May 2017), e1603055, https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1603055

Abstract

Climate change can have profound impacts on biodiversity and the sustainability of many ecosystems. Various studies have investigated the impacts of climate change, but large-scale, trait-specific impacts are less understood. We analyze abundance data over time for 86 tree species/groups across the eastern United States spanning the last three decades. We show that more tree species have experienced a westward shift (73%) than a poleward shift (62%) in their abundance, a trend that is stronger for saplings than adult trees. The ...

 

Countering European brain drain

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6339. (19 May 2017), pp. 695-696, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aan3920

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Mobile European researchers who went to the United States were significantly more likely to report strong positive career effects than their mobile peers who moved within the European Union (EU) (up to twice as high) [...] In search of a possible “elite” brain drain from Europe, we examined return rates for a sample of Europeans pursuing Ph.D. degrees in economics in the United States (3). Those better students who received Ph.D. degrees from top U.S. institutes are more likely ...

 

Human-started wildfires expand the fire niche across the United States

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 11. (14 March 2017), pp. 2946-2951, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1617394114

Abstract

[Significance] Fighting wildfires in the United States costs billions of dollars annually. Public dialog and ongoing research have focused on increasing wildfire risk because of climate warming, overlooking the direct role that people play in igniting wildfires and increasing fire activity. Our analysis of two decades of government agency wildfire records highlights the fundamental role of human ignitions. Human-started wildfires accounted for 84% of all wildfires, tripled the length of the fire season, dominated an area seven times greater than that affected ...

 

Estimating potential habitat for 134 eastern US tree species under six climate scenarios

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 254, No. 3. (February 2008), pp. 390-406, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2007.07.023

Abstract

We modeled and mapped, using the predictive data mining tool Random Forests, 134 tree species from the eastern United States for potential response to several scenarios of climate change. Each species was modeled individually to show current and potential future habitats according to two emission scenarios (high emissions on current trajectory and reasonable conservation of energy implemented) and three climate models: the Parallel Climate Model, the Hadley CM3 model, and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory model. Since we model potential suitable ...

 

Integrating social science research into wildland fire management

  
Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4. (29 July 2014), pp. 381-394, https://doi.org/10.1108/dpm-10-2013-0193

Abstract

Purpose – Social science research is used to support the formulation of natural resource management decisions with accurate and timely information. Due to risk and potential impacts, this is important in wildland fire management. The purpose of this paper is to identify the respondent perceptions of a natural disturbance agent's impact on fire management in Colorado and Wyoming. Design/methodology/approach – The research methodology included a self-administered questionnaire completed by a random sample of respondents in three study locations adjacent to national forests. A quantitative ...

 

Warming and earlier spring increase western U.S. forest wildfire activity

  
Science, Vol. 313, No. 5789. (18 August 2006), pp. 940-943, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1128834

Abstract

Western United States forest wildfire activity is widely thought to have increased in recent decades, yet neither the extent of recent changes nor the degree to which climate may be driving regional changes in wildfire has been systematically documented. Much of the public and scientific discussion of changes in western United States wildfire has focused instead on the effects of 19th- and 20th-century land-use history. We compiled a comprehensive database of large wildfires in western United States forests since 1970 and ...

 

Climate and species functional traits influence maximum live tree stocking in the Lake States, USA

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 386 (February 2017), pp. 51-61, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2016.12.007

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Specific gravity and shade tolerance impact maximum stocking of tree species. [::] Temperature and precipitation interact with these traits to govern maximum stocking. [::] The results provide a simple, additive density measure for these complex forests. [Abstract] Quantifying the density of live trees in forest stands and partitioning it between species or other stand components is critical for predicting forest dynamics and responses to management, as well as understanding the impacts of stand composition and structure on productivity. As plant traits such as shade ...

 

The National Fire-Danger Rating System: basic equations

  
Vol. PSW-82 (1985)

Abstract

Updating the National Fire-Danger Rating System (NFDRS) was completed in 1977, and operational use of it was begun the next year. The System provides a guide to wildfire control and suppression by its indexes that measure the relative potential of initiating fires. Such fires do not behave erratically–they spread without spotting through continuous ground fuels. Estimates of fire potential have a basis in the mathematical models used for fire behavior. The fire manager must select the fuel model that best represents ...

 

US exposure to multiple landscape stressors and climate change

  
Regional Environmental Change, Vol. 16, No. 7. (2016), pp. 2129-2140, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-016-0934-2

Abstract

We examined landscape exposure to wildfire potential, insects and disease risk, and urban and exurban development for the conterminous US (CONUS). Our analysis relied on spatial data used by federal agencies to evaluate these stressors nationally. We combined stressor data with a climate change exposure metric to identify when temperature is likely to depart from historical conditions and become “unprecedented.” We used a neighborhood analysis procedure based on key stressor thresholds within a geographic information system to examine the extent of ...

 

Climate change and forest fires

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 262, No. 3. (15 November 2000), pp. 221-229, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0048-9697(00)00524-6

Abstract

This paper addresses the impacts of climate change on forest fires and describes how this, in turn, will impact on the forests of the United States. In addition to reviewing existing studies on climate change and forest fires we have used two transient general circulation models (GCMs), namely the Hadley Centre and the Canadian GCMs, to estimate fire season severity in the middle of the next century. Ratios of 2×CO2 seasonal severity rating (SSR) over present day SSR were calculated for ...

 

Disturbance and the carbon balance of US forests: a quantitative review of impacts from harvests, fires, insects, and droughts

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 143 (August 2016), pp. 66-80, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.06.002

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Available data suggest harvest is the leading disturbance impact on C in US forests then fire, windthrow, insects, and droughts. [::] Disturbances in US forests lead to the loss of at least 200 Tg C in live biomass each year on average. [::] Regrowth roughly balances disturbance emissions, with growth enhancements contributing significantly to the net change in forest carbon. [::] Natural disturbance events are likely to rise in the future, leading to net release of forest carbon. [Abstract] Disturbances are a major determinant of ...

 

Vegetation response to a short interval between high-severity wildfires in a mixed-evergreen forest

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 97, No. 1. (January 2009), pp. 142-154, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2008.01456.x

Abstract

[::] Variations in disturbance regime strongly influence ecosystem structure and function. A prominent form of such variation is when multiple high-severity wildfires occur in rapid succession (i.e. short-interval (SI) severe fires, or ‘re-burns’). These events have been proposed as key mechanisms altering successional rates and pathways. [::] We utilized a natural experiment afforded by two overlapping wildfires occurring within a 15-year interval in forests of the Klamath–Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon (USA). We tested for unique effects of a SI fire (15-year interval before ...

 

Interactions of landscape disturbances and climate change dictate ecological pattern and process: spatial modeling of wildfire, insect, and disease dynamics under future climates

  
Landscape Ecology (2016), pp. 1-13, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-016-0414-6

Abstract

[Context] Interactions among disturbances, climate, and vegetation influence landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. Climate changes, exotic invasions, beetle outbreaks, altered fire regimes, and human activities may interact to produce landscapes that appear and function beyond historical analogs. [Objectives] We used the mechanistic ecosystem-fire process model FireBGCv2 to model interactions of wildland fire, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) under current and future climates, across three diverse study areas. [Methods] We assessed changes in tree basal area as a measure of ...

 

Climate change presents increased potential for very large fires in the contiguous United States

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 24, No. 7. (2015), pp. 892-899, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf15083

Abstract

Very large fires (VLFs) have important implications for communities, ecosystems, air quality and fire suppression expenditures. VLFs over the contiguous US have been strongly linked with meteorological and climatological variability. Building on prior modelling of VLFs (>5000 ha), an ensemble of 17 global climate models were statistically downscaled over the US for climate experiments covering the historic and mid-21st-century periods to estimate potential changes in VLF occurrence arising from anthropogenic climate change. Increased VLF potential was projected across most historically fire-prone ...

 

Impact of anthropogenic climate change on wildfire across western US forests

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201607171, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1607171113

Abstract

[Significance] Increased forest fire activity across the western United States in recent decades has contributed to widespread forest mortality, carbon emissions, periods of degraded air quality, and substantial fire suppression expenditures. Although numerous factors aided the recent rise in fire activity, observed warming and drying have significantly increased fire-season fuel aridity, fostering a more favorable fire environment across forested systems. We demonstrate that human-caused climate change caused over half of the documented increases in fuel aridity since the 1970s and doubled the ...

 

Human-caused climate change is now a key driver of forest fire activity in the western United States

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201612926, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1612926113

Abstract

[Excerpt] Effects of climate warming on natural and human systems are becoming increasingly visible across the globe. For example, the shattering of past yearly records for global high temperatures seems to be a near-annual event, with the five hottest years since 1880 all occurring since 2005. Not coincidentally, the single hottest year on record, 2015, also broke records for area burned by wildfire in the United States [...], eclipsing the previous high mark set just one decade prior. Scientists have known ...

 

Assessing live fuel moisture for fire management applications

  
In Fire in ecosystem management: shifting the paradigm from suppression to prescription, Vol. 20 (1998), pp. 49-55

Abstract

The variation associated with sampling live fuel moisture was examined for several shrub and canopy fuels in southern California, Arizona, and Colorado. Ninety-five % confidence intervals ranged from 5 to % . Estimated sample sizes varied greatly. The value of knowing the live fuel moisture content in fire decision making is unknown. If the fuel moisture is highly variable, then it is possible for the confidence intervals to span one or more fire behavior or danger classes. Errors in live fuel ...

 

Post-fire geomorphic response in steep, forested landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA

  
Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 28, No. 11-12. (June 2009), pp. 1131-1146, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.05.003

Abstract

The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends on a suite of hydrologic, biologic, and geological characteristics, including the propensity for hydrophobic soil layers to promote runoff erosion during subsequent rainfall events. In the Oregon Coast Range, several studies postulate that fire primarily modulates sediment production via root reinforcement and shallow landslide susceptibility, although few studies have documented post-fire geomorphic response. Here, we describe field observations and topographic analyses for three sites in the central Oregon Coast Range that ...

 

Forest Service survey finds record 66 million dead trees in Southern Sierra Nevada

  
(June 2016)

Abstract

[Excerpt] The U.S. Forest Service today announced that it has identified an additional 26 million trees dead in California since October 2015. These trees are located in six counties across 760,000 acres in the southern Sierra Nevada region of the state, and are in addition to the 40 million trees that died statewide from 2010 to October 2015, bringing the total to at least 66 million dead trees. Four consecutive years of severe drought in California, a dramatic rise in bark ...

 

Drought triggered tree mortality in mixed conifer forests in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 218, No. 1-3. (October 2005), pp. 229-244, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2005.07.014

Abstract

Tree mortality is an important process causing forest structural and compositional change. In this study, we investigate the influence of drought and topography on recent patterns of tree mortality in old-growth mixed conifer forests in Yosemite National Park, located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of northern California, USA. The surveyed stands have experienced a century of fire exclusion and are dominated by associations of Pinus ponderosa, Calocedrus decurrens and Abies concolor. The average age of trees in the stands was 88 ...

 

Correlations between components of the water balance and burned area reveal new insights for predicting forest fire area in the southwest United States

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 24, No. 1. (2015), 14, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf14023

Abstract

We related measurements of annual burned area in the southwest United States during 1984–2013 to records of climate variability. Within forests, annual burned area correlated at least as strongly with spring–summer vapour pressure deficit (VPD) as with 14 other drought-related metrics, including more complex metrics that explicitly represent fuel moisture. Particularly strong correlations with VPD arise partly because this term dictates the atmospheric moisture demand. Additionally, VPD responds to moisture supply, which is difficult to measure and model regionally due to ...

 

Modeling monthly near-surface air temperature from solar radiation and lapse rate: application over complex terrain in Yellowstone national park

  
Physical Geography, Vol. 29, No. 2. (1 March 2008), pp. 158-178, https://doi.org/10.2747/0272-3646.29.2.158

Abstract

Spatially distributed surface temperature over complex topography is important to many ecological processes, but it varies spatially and temporally in complex ways and is difficult to measure at landscape scales at tens of meters resolution. Our goal is to develop a methodology that accurately predicts surface temperature in mountain ecosystems. First, we modeled monthly incoming solar radiation (insolation) based on topography and observed variation in atmospheric conditions, and accounting for site latitude, elevation, and surface orientation (slope and aspect), daily and ...

 

Natural and anthropogenic drivers of calcium depletion in a northern forest during the last millennium

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 25. (21 June 2016), pp. 6934-6938, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1604909113

Abstract

[Significance] This research breaks new ground by showing that, contrary to generally accepted theories of ecosystem development, calcium depletion has been occurring for millennia as a natural consequence of long-term ecosystem development. This natural process predisposed forest ecosystems in the region to detrimental responses to acid rain in the 20th century. We also show that nitrogen availability was increasing concurrently with the depletion of calcium. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to reconstruct continuous changes in nutrient availability for a ...

 

Science 101: building the foundations for real understanding

  
Science, Vol. 330, No. 6012. (02 December 2010), pp. 1764-1765, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1186994

Abstract

It's not just about evolution anymore. Growing anti-science sentiment in the United States now infuses public discourse on conservation, vaccination, distribution of research funds, and climate change (1). Low rates of scientific literacy (2) exacerbate the problem. Although the public recognizes its indebtedness to the products of scientific knowledge, few understand much about the nature of that knowledge or the processes that generated it (3). Without a basic understanding of how science works, the public is vulnerable to antiscience propaganda, which ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 37

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   tropics   trunk-sucker   tsuga-canadensis   tsuga-chinensis   tsuga-heterophylla   tsuga-mertensiana   tsuga-spp   tundra   turing-completeness   turkey   tuscany   tuta-absoluta   twig-dieback   two-dimensional-gas-chromatography   two-stage-peer-review   udig   ukraine   ulex-europaeus   ulmus   ulmus-americana   ulmus-carpinifolia   ulmus-glabra   ulmus-laevis   ulmus-minor   ulmus-parvifolia   ulmus-procera   ulmus-pumila   ulmus-rubra   ulmus-spp   ulmus-thomasii   umbellularia-californica   umbrella-species   uncertainty   uncertainty-propagation   underfitting   understorey   understorey-species   undisturbed-habitat   uneven-aged-forest   unexpected-effect   ungulate   ungulate-browsing   united-kingdom   united-states   universal-approximation   unknown   unrealistic-expectations   unsupervised-training   upper-treeline   uprooting   urban-areas   urban-forest   urban-habitats   urban-trees   urgent-hpc   url-decay   urocerus-gigas   ursus-arctos   usda   ushahidi   usle   usped   utilization   vaccination   vaccinium-myrtillus   vaccinium-oxycoccos   vaccinium-spp   vaccinium-uliginosum   vaccinium-vitis-idaea   vaccinum-myrtillus   validation   valsa-melanodiscus   variability   variable-selection   variance-partitioning   variation   vascular-plants   vascular-system   vauable   vegetation   vegetation-buffer   vegetation-changes   vegetation-composition   vegetation-diversity   vegetation-dynamics   vegetation-types   vegetative-propagation   veneer   venice   verification-vs-corroboration   veronica-officinalis   vertebrate   verticillium-dahliae   vgi   viburnum-lantana   viburnum-opalus   viburnum-opulus   viburnum-spp   vietnam  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Changes in climatic water balance drive downhill shifts in plant species' optimum elevations

  
Science, Vol. 331, No. 6015. (2011), pp. 324-327, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1199040

Abstract

Uphill shifts of species' distributions in response to historical warming are well documented, which leads to widespread expectations of continued uphill shifts under future warming. Conversely, downhill shifts are often considered anomalous and unrelated to climate change. By comparing the altitudinal distributions of 64 plant species between the 1930s and the present day within California, we show that climate changes have resulted in a significant downward shift in species' optimum elevations. This downhill shift is counter to what would be expected ...

 

Consistent land- and atmosphere-based U.S. carbon sink estimates

  
Science, Vol. 292, No. 5525. (2001), pp. 2316-2320, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1057320

Abstract

For the period 1980-89, we estimate a carbon sink in the coterminous United States between 0.30 and 0.58 petagrams of carbon per year (petagrams of carbon = 1015 grams of carbon). The net carbon flux from the atmosphere to the land was higher, 0.37 to 0.71 petagrams of carbon per year, because a net flux of 0.07 to 0.13 petagrams of carbon per year was exported by rivers and commerce and returned to the atmosphere elsewhere. These land-based estimates are larger ...

 

Dust and biological aerosols from the Sahara and Asia influence precipitation in the Western U.S.

  
Science, Vol. 339, No. 6127. (2013), pp. 1572-1578, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1227279

Abstract

Snowfall in the Sierra Nevada provides a large fraction of the water that California receives as precipitation. Knowing what factors influence the amount of snow that falls is thus critical for projecting how water availability may change in the future. Aerosols have an important effect on cloud processes and precipitation. Creamean et al. (p. 1572, published online 28 February) found that dust and biological aerosols originating from as far away as the Sahara facilitate ice nuclei formation and ice-induced precipitation in ...

 

Greater sensitivity to drought accompanies maize yield increase in the U.S. Midwest

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6183. (2014), pp. 516-519, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1251423

Abstract

The U.S. Corn Belt accounts for a sizeable portion of the world's maize growth. Various influences have increased yields over the years. Lobell et al. (p. 516; see the Perspective by Ort and Long) now show that sensitivity to drought has been increasing as well. It seems that as plants have been bred for increased yield under ideal conditions, the plants become more sensitive to non-ideal conditions. A key factor may be the planting density. Although today's maize varieties are more ...

 

Restoration of the Mississippi delta: lessons from hurricanes Katrina and Rita

  
Science, Vol. 315, No. 5819. (2007), pp. 1679-1684, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1137030

Abstract

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita showed the vulnerability of coastal communities and how human activities that caused deterioration of the Mississippi Deltaic Plain (MDP) exacerbated this vulnerability. The MDP formed by dynamic interactions between river and coast at various temporal and spatial scales, and human activity has reduced these interactions at all scales. Restoration efforts aim to re-establish this dynamic interaction, with emphasis on reconnecting the river to the deltaic plain. Science must guide MDP restoration, which will provide insights into delta ...

 

The Holdridge life zones of the conterminous United States in relation to ecosystem mapping

  
Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 26, No. 5. (September 1999), pp. 1025-1038, https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2699.1999.00329.x

Abstract

[Aim] Our main goals were to develop a map of the life zones for the conterminous United States, based on the Holdridge Life Zone system, as a tool for ecosystem mapping, and to compare the map of Holdridge life zones with other global vegetation classification and mapping efforts. [Location] The area of interest is the forty-eight contiguous states of the United States. [Methods] We wrote a PERL program for determining life zones from climatic data and linked it to the image processing workbench ...

 

Conterminous U.S. and Alaska Forest Type Mapping Using Forest Inventory and Analysis Data

  
Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing (November 2008), pp. 1379-1388, https://doi.org/10.14358/pers.74.11.1379

Abstract

Classification-trees were used to model forest type groups and forest types for the conterminous United States and Alaska. The predictor data were a geospatial data set with a spatial resolution of 250 m developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS). The response data were plot data from the USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis program. Overall accuracies for the conterminous U.S. for the forest type group and forest type were 69 percent (Kappa = 0.66) and 50 percent (Kappa ...

 

Potential effect of Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on urban trees in the United States

  
Journal of Economic Entomology, Vol. 94, No. 1. (01 February 2001), pp. 116-122, https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-94.1.116

Abstract

Anoplophora glabripennis Motschulsky, a wood borer native to Asia, was recently found in New York City and Chicago. In an attempt to eradicate these beetle populations, thousands of infested city trees have been removed. Field data from nine U.S. cities and national tree cover data were used to estimate the potential effects of A. glabripennis on urban resources through time. For the cities analyzed, the potential tree resources at risk to A. glabripennis attack based on host preferences, ranges from 12 ...

 

European Black Pine Pinus nigra Arnold

  
In Silvics of North America. Vol 1: Conifers (1990), pp. 797-818

Abstract

European black pine (Pinus nigra), also called Austrian pine, was one of the early tree introductions into the United States, first reported in cultivation in 1759 (52). Black pine was one of the first conifers tested for adaptability in the Sandhills of Nebraska in the 1891 Bruner plantation, Holt County, and in 1909 on the Nebraska National Forest. It was also planted by homesteaders on the Great Plains in the early 1900's to provide beauty and protection from wind and snow on ...

 

Textbook of Wood Technology: Structure, Identification, Properties, and Uses of the Commercial Woods of the United States and Canada

  
Vol. 1 (1980)
 

A Guide to Useful Woods of the World

  
(1994)

Abstract

An invaluable reference source for woodworkers, wood collectors, and others interested in wood. This all new 640-page edition of the Guide introduces 78 additional species and contains a number of invaluable features not included in the original edition, including: 1) each of the 279 species is described in a two-page data sheet containing information on the scientific name, family name, other names, distribution, the tree, the timber, seasoning, durability, workability, uses, and supplies; 2) specific gravity is included for all species and ...

 

Hardwoods of North America

  
(1995)

Abstract

This report describes 53 taxa of hardwoods of North America, which are organized alphabetically by genus. Descriptions include scientific name, trade name, distribution, tree characteristics, wood characteristics (general, weight, mechanical properties, drying, shrinkage, working properties, durability, preservation, toxicity and uses) and additional sources for information. Data were compiled from existing literature, mostly from research done at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI. ...

 

Genetic structure of natural populations of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) at Coweeta, North Carolina

  
Journal of Plant Research In Journal of Plant Research, Vol. 111, No. 1. (1998), pp. 17-24, https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02507146

Abstract

Natural population of black locust maintains very high levels of genetic diversity within populations without any noticeable geographic patterns. In order to assess the species' potential for manipulation through breeding programs, more detailed spatial pattern analyses of fine-scale population structure was attempted in the two study sites (watershed 2 and 21) in the Coweeta River Basin of southern Appalachian mountains using allozyme markers. Of the 200 and 420 plants examined in watershed 21 and 2 respectively, 13 and 15 major genotypes ...

 

Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.)

  
In Silvics of North America. Vol 2: Hardwoods (1990)

Abstract

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), sometimes called yellow locust, grows naturally on a wide range of sites but does best on rich moist limestone soils. It has escaped cultivation and become naturalized throughout eastern North America and parts of the West. Black locust is not a commercial timber species but is useful for many other purposes. Because it is a nitrogen fixer and has rapid juvenile growth, it is widely planted as an ornamental, for shelterbelts, and for land reclamation. It is suitable ...

 

Assessing crown fire potential in coniferous forests of western North America: a critique of current approaches and recent simulation studies

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 19, No. 4. (2010), 377, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf08132

Abstract

To control and use wildland fires safely and effectively depends on creditable assessments of fire potential, including the propensity for crowning in conifer forests. Simulation studies that use certain fire modelling systems (i.e. NEXUS, FlamMap, FARSITE, FFE-FVS (Fire and Fuels Extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator), Fuel Management Analyst (FMAPlus®), BehavePlus) based on separate implementations or direct integration of Rothermel’s surface and crown rate of fire spread models with Van Wagner’s crown fire transition and propagation models are shown to have ...

 

Quercus

  
In Flora of North America North of Mexico, Vol. 3 (1997)

Abstract

Flora of North America builds upon the cumulative wealth of information acquired since botanical studies began in the United States and Canada more than two centuries ago. Recent research has been integrated with historical studies, so that the Flora of North America is a single-source synthesis of North American floristics. FNA has the full support of scientific botanical societies and is the botanical community's vehicle for synthesizing and presenting this information. The Flora of North America Project will treat more than 20,000 ...

 

The ecology and silviculture of oaks

  
In The ecology and silviculture of oaks (2002), https://doi.org/10.1079/9780851995700.0000

Abstract

This book contains 10 chapters divided into 3 sections. The first section consists 3 chapters on the ecological characteristics and distribution of oak species and the various kinds of oak forests in the USA. The next 2 chapters on regeneration ecology provide the critical interference between oak ecology and silviculture. The second section comprises 3 chapters covering site productivity and stand development. The third section comprises 4 chapters on silvicultural methods and the growth and yield of oak forests. ...

 

Picea sitchensis

  
In Fire Effects Information System [online] (1992)

Abstract

The Fire Effects Information System is an online collection of reviews of the scientific literature about fire effects on plants and animals and about fire regimes of plant communities in the United States. FEIS reviews are based on thorough literature searches, often supplemented with insights from field scientists and managers. FEIS provides reviews that are efficient to use, thoroughly documented, and defensible. Approximately 15 to 30 new or revised reviews are published in FEIS each year. There are 3 types of ...

 

Port-Orford-Cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murr.) Parl.) An American Wood

  
In FS-228 (February 1984)

Abstract

Uniform texture, good machining properties, moderate shrinkage, resistance to warp and decay, lightness and strength, and good paint-holding characteristics make Port-Orford-cedar desirable for a variety of uses. Logs, exported mostly to Japan, bring higher prices than logs of any other North American conifer. Japanese builders and woodcrafters favor the wood for woodenware, novelties, and toys, and for the construction and repair of houses, shrines, and temples. Future growth and management of this valuable tree, known also for its grace in ornamental ...

 

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana

  
In Fire Effects Information System [online] (1990)

Abstract

The Fire Effects Information System is an online collection of reviews of the scientific literature about fire effects on plants and animals and about fire regimes of plant communities in the United States. FEIS reviews are based on thorough literature searches, often supplemented with insights from field scientists and managers. FEIS provides reviews that are efficient to use, thoroughly documented, and defensible. Approximately 15 to 30 new or revised reviews are published in FEIS each year. There are 3 types of ...

 

Alnus incana

  
In Fire Effects Information System [online] (2011)

Abstract

The Fire Effects Information System is an online collection of reviews of the scientific literature about fire effects on plants and animals and about fire regimes of plant communities in the United States. FEIS reviews are based on thorough literature searches, often supplemented with insights from field scientists and managers. FEIS provides reviews that are efficient to use, thoroughly documented, and defensible. Approximately 15 to 30 new or revised reviews are published in FEIS each year. There are 3 types of ...

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.