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Selection: with tag united-kingdom [64 articles] 

 

Sun in parts of UK and France blocked out the smoke from wildfires in Spain and Portugal

  
Severe Weather Europe, Vol. 2017 (2017), 111799

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Parts of Spain and Portugal are experiencing extreme fires, caused by a combination of a dry spring and summer and likely arson. The thick smoke was advected by southerly winds into the Bay of Biscay, northwestern France (Brittany) and across the United Kingdom. Residents of this area awoke to a dark orange and brown sky, with the Sun either completely blocked or strongly subdued. While smoke from fires being blown large distances is not rare, it is rare for ...

 

Calibration and evaluation of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System for improved wildland fire danger rating in the United Kingdom

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 5. (30 May 2016), pp. 1217-1237, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-1217-2016

Abstract

Wildfires in the United Kingdom (UK) pose a threat to people, infrastructure and the natural environment. During periods of particularly fire-prone weather, wildfires can occur simultaneously across large areas, placing considerable stress upon the resources of fire and rescue services. Fire danger rating systems (FDRSs) attempt to anticipate periods of heightened fire risk, primarily for early-warning and preparedness purposes. The UK FDRS, termed the Met Office Fire Severity Index (MOFSI), is based on the Fire Weather Index (FWI) component of the ...

 

Modelling potential impacts of climate change on the bioclimatic envelope of species in Britain and Ireland

  
Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol. 11, No. 6. (November 2002), pp. 453-462, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1466-8238.2002.00304.x

Abstract

[Aim] Climate change has the potential to have significant impacts on the distribution of species and on the composition of habitats. This paper identifies the potential changes in the future distribution of species under the UKCIP98 climate change scenarios, in order that such changes can be taken into account in conservation management. [Location] The model was applied to Britain and Ireland. [Methods] A model based on an artificial neural network was used to predict the changing bioclimate envelopes of species in Britain and ...

 

It's impossible to conduct research without software, say 7 out of 10 UK researchers

  
Software and research, Vol. 5 (2014), 1536

Abstract

No one knows how much software is used in research. Look around any lab and you’ll see software – both standard and bespoke – being used by all disciplines and seniorities of researchers. Software is clearly fundamental to research, but we can’t prove this without evidence. And this lack of evidence is the reason why we ran a survey of researchers at 15 Russell Group universities to find out about their software use and background. [Excerpt: Headline figures] [::] 92% of academics use ...

 

Forecasting the outbreak of moorland wildfires in the English Peak District

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 90, No. 8. (25 June 2009), pp. 2642-2651, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2009.02.011

Abstract

Warmer, drier summers brought by climate change increase the potential risk of wildfires on the moorland of the Peak District of northern England. Fires are costly to fight, damage the ecosystem, harm water catchments, cause erosion scars and disrupt transport. Fires release carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Accurate forecasts of the timing of fires help deployment of fire fighting resources. A probit model is used to assess the chance of fires at different times of the year, days of the week ...

 

Brexit watch: scientists grapple with the fallout

  

Abstract

Xenophobia and mobility fears among issues facing researchers two weeks on. [Excerpt] Two weeks after the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union, the future remains opaque. Concerns within the research community are particularly intense for those who rely on the EU for funding, or who have the right to work in the United Kingdom only because they are citizens of other EU countries. Here is Nature’s selection of the week’s post-Brexit science news. [\n] [...] ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 37

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   tropics   trunk-sucker   tsuga-canadensis   tsuga-chinensis   tsuga-heterophylla   tsuga-mertensiana   tsuga-spp   tundra   turing-completeness   turkey   tuscany   tuta-absoluta   twig-dieback   two-dimensional-gas-chromatography   two-stage-peer-review   udig   ukraine   ulex-europaeus   ulmus   ulmus-americana   ulmus-carpinifolia   ulmus-glabra   ulmus-laevis   ulmus-minor   ulmus-parvifolia   ulmus-procera   ulmus-pumila   ulmus-rubra   ulmus-spp   ulmus-thomasii   umbellularia-californica   umbrella-species   uncertainty   uncertainty-propagation   underfitting   understorey   understorey-species   undisturbed-habitat   uneven-aged-forest   unexpected-effect   ungulate   ungulate-browsing   united-kingdom   united-states   universal-approximation   unknown   unrealistic-expectations   unsupervised-training   upper-treeline   uprooting   urban-areas   urban-forest   urban-habitats   urban-trees   urgent-hpc   url-decay   urocerus-gigas   ursus-arctos   usda   ushahidi   usle   usped   utilization   vaccination   vaccinium-myrtillus   vaccinium-oxycoccos   vaccinium-spp   vaccinium-uliginosum   vaccinium-vitis-idaea   vaccinum-myrtillus   validation   valsa-melanodiscus   variability   variable-selection   variance-partitioning   variation   vascular-plants   vascular-system   vauable   vegetation   vegetation-buffer   vegetation-changes   vegetation-composition   vegetation-diversity   vegetation-dynamics   vegetation-types   vegetative-propagation   veneer   venice   verification-vs-corroboration   veronica-officinalis   vertebrate   verticillium-dahliae   vgi   viburnum-lantana   viburnum-opalus   viburnum-opulus   viburnum-spp   vietnam  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Extinction debt of forest plants persists for more than a century following habitat fragmentation

  
Ecology, Vol. 87, No. 3. (March 2006), pp. 542-548, https://doi.org/10.1890/05-1182

Abstract

Following habitat fragmentation individual habitat patches may lose species over time as they pay off their “extinction debt.” Species with relatively low rates of population extinction and colonization (“slow” species) may maintain extinction debts for particularly prolonged periods, but few data are available to test this prediction. We analyzed two unusually detailed data sets on forest plant distributions and land-use history from Lincolnshire, United Kingdom, and Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium, to test for an extinction debt in relation to species-specific extinction and colonization ...

 

Host plant selection and resource utilisation by Asian longhorn beetle Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in southern England

  
Forestry, Vol. 88, No. 1. (01 January 2015), pp. 84-95, https://doi.org/10.1093/forestry/cpu037

Abstract

In February 2012, an outbreak of Asian longhorn beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), was discovered at Paddock Wood in Kent, in southern England, next to a small industrial premise where a previous company had imported stone from China. Anoplophora glabripennis is a serious pest of deciduous broadleaved trees and is native to China, but it has been transported around the world in wood packaging material. Its discovery at Paddock Wood prompted an eradication programme in which all infested trees and any trees ...

 

Diagnosis Of Ill-Health In Trees

  
(1994)

Abstract

An easy to understand non-laboratory based system for determining the causes of ill-health in trees. The emphasis is on problems of species grown for non-commercial purposes, but nearly all causes of ill-health in trees are covered in some detail, apart from damage from biting insects and mammals. Key features Provides review of current technical background and advice on the impacts of trees on the surrounding built environment Focuses on a broad range of practical issues, specifically ...

 

Diseases and disorders of forest trees: a guide to identifying causes of ill health in woods and plantations

  
(1998)

Abstract

A guide to identifying causes of ill-health in woods and plantations. Part one of the book provides useful guidelines by which managers and owners can investigate health problems in their trees. Part two is a key to the most common problems of plantation trees and in part 3 important features of some of the diseases and disorders covered in part 2 are summarised. ...

 

British woodland produce

  
(1990)

Abstract

This book covers the full range from the political and social background against which our forests have been established, to the ultimate structure of the wood tissue, bringing together the results of research and their practical application in utilisation and marketing. the subjects covered include conversion; uses for both round and sawn timber; wood preservation; modern uses for residues' and the requirements of British Standards. An invaluable guide as well as a complete book of reference. ...

 

Biological Flora of the British Isles: Robinia pseudoacacia

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 101, No. 6. (November 2013), pp. 1623-1640, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12162

Abstract

This account presents information on all aspects of the biology of Robinia pseudoacacia L. that are relevant to understanding its ecological characteristics and behaviour. The main topics are presented within the standard framework of the Biological Flora of the British Isles: distribution, habitat, communities, responses to biotic factors, responses to environment, structure and physiology, phenology, floral and seed characters, herbivores and disease, and history and conservation. Robinia pseudoacacia, false acacia or black locust, is a deciduous, broad-leaved tree ...

 

Clonal structure and recruitment in British wild cherry (Prunus avium L.)

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 242, No. 2-3. (April 2007), pp. 419-430, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2007.01.059

Abstract

The extent of clonal reproduction may significantly influence the genetic structure and reproductive ability of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) populations. In this study we used simple sequence repeat (SSR) variation to examine the relative frequency and distribution of vegetatively derived wild cherry in two ancient woodlands subject to contrasting management regimes. The probability of identical genotypes arising through sexual reproduction was determined to be negligible, both statistically and through screening a large population of known full-siblings. Only 246 genotypes were ...

 

Eucalyptus in the British Isles

  
Quarterly Journal of Forestry, Vol. 105, No. 1. (2011), pp. 43-53
 

The potential for Eucalyptus as a wood fuel in the UK

  
Applied Energy, Vol. 89, No. 1. (January 2012), pp. 176-182, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2011.07.037

Abstract

Considerable potential exists in the UK for utilising woody biomass, grown under short rotation forestry management systems, to produce electricity or heat. There are benefits to using biomass in generating heat and power the main environmental benefit being from substituting for fossil fuel combustion and consequent carbon emissions. Woody biomass production in short rotation forestry involves growing single stemmed trees rather than coppice over rotations of between 10 and 15 years. Eucalypts are particularly suited to such biomass production as they exhibit ...

 

Prospects for timber frame in multi-storey house building in England, France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden

  
Vol. 52 (2009)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Summary] Many countries across Europe, encouraged by EU policies, have set targets to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions and are adopting legislative methods to ensure buildings and materials help achieve individual country targets. In many cases this has led to an increased use, or at least consideration, of wood as an alternative to conventional construction materials such as steel and concrete. [\n] Apart from building regulations and other policy instruments, the potential for multi-storey timber frame buildings is first of all ...

 

BSBI Big Database

  
(2015)

Abstract

Launched in 1950, it is one of the world’s longest-running natural history distribution mapping projects. It is constantly updated and improved by the BSBI’s networks of volunteers, county recorders and referees, and it is always in use by scientists, conservationists and governmental bodies for determining the abundance, range and changes in the distribution of vascular plants and charophytes in the British Isles. ...

 

Trees and Their Habitats: An Ecological Guide to Some European Trees Grown at Westonbirt Arboretum

  
(1982)
 

Environmentally sensitive plot-scale timber harvesting: impacts on suspended sediment, bedload and bank erosion dynamics

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 63, No. 1. (September 2001), pp. 3-25, https://doi.org/10.1006/jema.2001.0459

Abstract

The impact on sediment pollution of environmentally sensitive harvesting of a 15 ha plot (20% of the catchment area) of mature coniferous plantation forest in the 0·89 km2Afon Tanllwyth catchment, Plynlimon, was investigated for 12 months before harvesting began and a further 18 months after. The results revealed: [::(a)] a steepening of the suspended sediment concentration vs. discharge rating curve resulting in a 39% increase in suspended sediment yield (as compared to the adjacent forested Hafren catchment) during the year in which the ...

 

The trees of Great Britain and Ireland - Vol. 7

  
(1913)

Abstract

Elwes in conjunction with the botanist Henry described every species of tree then grown outdoors in the British Isles, and recorded the finest specimens then to be seen. Henry's contribution to the book was unique insofar as he devised a system of identification based on leaves and twigs and on the position of buds to aid identification even in the absence of fruit and flowers. Most of these were visited and recorded personally, a process which caused Elwes to wear out ...

 

Host Plant Selection by Aphids: Behavioral, Evolutionary, and Applied Perspectives

  
Annual Review of Entomology, Vol. 51, No. 1. (8 August 2006), pp. 309-330, https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.ento.51.110104.151107

Abstract

▪ Abstract As phloem feeders and major vectors of plant viruses, aphids are important pests of agricultural and horticultural crops worldwide. The processes of aphid settling and reproduction on plants therefore have a direct economic impact, and a better understanding of these events may lead to improved management strategies. Aphids are also important model organisms in the analysis of population differentiation and speciation in animals, and new ideas on plant utilization influence our understanding of the mechanisms generating biological diversity. Recent research ...

 

Spatial Pattern of Abundance of the Black Bean Aphid, Aphis fabae, in Britain

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 26, No. 2. (1989), pp. 463-472

Abstract

(1) Populations of Aphis fabae Scop. were monitored in Britain on its primary winter host, Euonymus europaeus L., on the two principal secondary summer crop hosts, springsown Vicia faba L. and sugar beet, and during the spring, summer and autumn migrations. This unique year-round monitoring was used to examine the spatial dynamics of the aphid in 1969-86. (2) Changes in the mean spatial pattern of a bundance of the aphid during a single annual cycle reflect a sequence of changing host ...

 

The Distribution and Abundance of the Spindle Tree, Euonymus europaeus, in Southern England with Particular Reference to Forecasting Infestations of the Black Bean Aphid, Aphis fabae

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 19, No. 3. (1982), pp. 929-940

Abstract

(1) A method is discussed for determining distribution and abundance of the spindle tree, Euonymus europaeus L. This could be used for other hedgerow species. (2) The work forms part of a study on forecasting of crop infestations of the black bean aphid, Aphis fabae Scop. based on overwintering populations on spindle for which corrections need to be made for the varying abundance of this winter host. (3) In southern England, spindle occurs in hedgerows, scrubland and woodland and is generally ...

 

Biological Flora of the British Isles: Euonymus europaeus L.

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 99, No. 1. (January 2011), pp. 345-365, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2010.01760.x

Abstract

1. This account presents information on all aspects of the biology of Euonymus europaeus that are relevant to understand its ecological characteristics and behaviour. The main topics are presented within the standard framework of the Biological Flora of the British Isles: distribution, habitat, communities, responses to biotic factors, responses to environment, structure and physiology, phenology, floral and seed characters, herbivores and disease, history, and conservation. 2.Euonymus europaeus (Spindle tree) is a native gynodioecious deciduous shrub whose distribution is mostly associated with ...

 

British Trees and Insects: The Role of Palatability

  
The American Naturalist, Vol. 118, No. 6. (1981), pp. 916-919

Abstract

[Excerpt] The wide variation in the number of species of insect herbivores associated with different plant species has been shown to be a result of, among other things, the following: the plant's cumulative ancient abundance (Southwood 1961); its geographical range (Strong 1974; Levin 1976; Lawton and Schroder 1977); the length of time that the plant has been available for colonization (Birks 1980); its taxonomic isolation (Lawton and Schriider 1977); successional status (Cates and Orians 1975); growth form (Maiorana 1978; Scriber 1978); ...

 

Plant communities of the Scottish Highlands - A study of Scottish mountain, moorland and forest vegetation

  
(1962)
 

Comparative Plant Ecology: A Functional Approach to common British Species

  
(2007)

Abstract

When the first edition of this book appeared in 1988 it was hailed as a breakthrough in the functional approach to the British flora, and the accounts of the functional ecology of common British vascular plants were widely used in academic research as well as in schemes for the management and conservation of vegetation. For this Second Edition Professor Grime has prepared twenty new panels to draw attention to the many new opportunities to `scale up or across' from dominant plant traits ...

 

The food-plants of the browntail moth Euproctis chrysorrhoea L.(Lep.: Lymantriidae) in East London

  
British Journal of Entomology and Natural History, Vol. 11 (1999), pp. 153-159

Abstract

The stature of Euproctis chrysorrhoea L., the browntail, as a pest in east London is well-documented: Chalmers-Hunt (1977), Plant (1993) and Hoyle (1993) describe browntail infestation in the London Borough of Newham, with the first two named authors referring to plagues in the 1970s. Chalmers-Hunt (1977) specifically named Wanstead Flats and Tower Hamlets. Hoyle (1993) detailed Newham in the context of infestation across most of London. Data on specific food-plants used in east London, or in urban areas generally, are restricted ...

 

The Hornbeam (Carpinus Betulus L.) In Britain

  
The Journal of Ecology, Vol. 12, No. 1. (January 1924), pp. 39-94, https://doi.org/10.2307/2255546

Abstract

[Excerpt] The Common Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) presents various features which are unique among our commoner British forest trees, and these features have never yet been adequately set forth — not even in that superb work, Elwes and Henry's Trees of Great Britain and Ireland. The tree has long interested me specially, owing to its exceptional abundance in my own country of Essex; and, in the following pages, I attempt to treat its various features and special points of interest more ...

 

The Trees of Great Britain and Ireland Vol. 6

  
(1912)

Abstract

Elwes in conjunction with the botanist Henry described every species of tree then grown outdoors in the British Isles, and recorded the finest specimens then to be seen. Henry's contribution to the book was unique insofar as he devised a system of identification based on leaves and twigs and on the position of buds to aid identification even in the absence of fruit and flowers. Most of these were visited and recorded personally, a process which caused Elwes to wear out ...

 

Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles Volume 4: Ri-Z

  
(1989)

Abstract

For the Eighth Edition every desciption has been corrected or rewritten where necessary and many entirely new ones have been included. Volume I contains a series of introductory chapters that provide a concise history of plant introductions to the British Isles, a summary of all the principle cultivation processes and an explanation of the systems of botanical nomenclature. The illustrations are entirely replanned, many taken specially for the volume A mass of accurate information is combined with an informal style to ...

 

Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles Volume 3: N-Rh

  
(1987)

Abstract

For the Eighth Edition every desciption has been corrected or rewritten where necessary and many entirely new ones have been included. Volume I contains a series of introductory chapters that provide a concise history of plant introductions to the British Isles, a summary of all the principle cultivation processes and an explanation of the systems of botanical nomenclature. The illustrations are entirely replanned, many taken specially for the volume A mass of accurate information is combined with an informal style to ...

 

Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles Volume 2: D-M

  
(1973)

Abstract

For the Eighth Edition every desciption has been corrected or rewritten where necessary and many entirely new ones have been included. Volume I contains a series of introductory chapters that provide a concise history of plant introductions to the British Isles, a summary of all the principle cultivation processes and an explanation of the systems of botanical nomenclature. The illustrations are entirely replanned, many taken specially for the volume A mass of accurate information is combined with an informal style to ...

 

Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles Volume 1: A-C

  
(1970)

Abstract

For the Eighth Edition every desciption has been corrected or rewritten where necessary and many entirely new ones have been included. Volume I contains a series of introductory chapters that provide a concise history of plant introductions to the British Isles, a summary of all the principle cultivation processes and an explanation of the systems of botanical nomenclature. The illustrations are entirely replanned, many taken specially for the volume A mass of accurate information is combined with an informal style to ...

 

The nature conservation value of scrub in Britain

  
(2000)

Abstract

This report represents a synthesis of the existing knowledge of scrub ecology and conservation, and identifies priorities for future conservation and research. This information has been accessed through published and unpublished literature, questionnaires, an expert workshop, and through consultation with national and international experts. ...

 

Applications of the crown diameter-stem diameter relationship for different species of broadleaved trees

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 215, No. 1-3. (2005), pp. 285-294, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2005.05.016

Abstract

There is a well known but comparatively little-studied relationship between crown diameters (K) and stem diameters (d) of trees. Between about 20 and 50 cm dbh the relationship is very close to being linear, with an r2 value higher than 0.8. The investigation described in this paper was conducted to establish the relationships for 11 broadleaved species that are commonly grown in Britain. The results indicated that all species have higher K/d ratios when they are young, but the ratio reduces as ...

 

Genetic effects of chronic habitat fragmentation on tree species: the case of Sorbus aucuparia in a deforested Scottish landscape

  
Molecular Ecology, Vol. 13, No. 3. (March 2004), pp. 573-584, https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-294x.2004.02093.x

Abstract

Sustainable forest restoration and management practices require a thorough understanding of the influence that habitat fragmentation has on the processes shaping genetic variation and its distribution in tree populations. We quantified genetic variation at isozyme markers and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA), analysed by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in severely fragmented populations of Sorbus aucuparia (Rosaceae) in a single catchment (Moffat) in southern Scotland. Remnants maintain surprisingly high levels of gene diversity (HE) for isozymes (HE = 0.195) and cpDNA ...

 

Brenneria goodwinii sp. nov., associated with acute oak decline in the UK

  
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, Vol. 62, No. Pt 10. (01 October 2012), pp. 2451-2456, https://doi.org/10.1099/ijs.0.037879-0

Abstract

A group of nine Gram-negative staining, facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains isolated from native oak trees displaying symptoms of acute oak decline (AOD) in the UK were investigated using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that these isolates form a distinct lineage within the genus Brenneria, family Enterobacteriaceae, and are most closely related to Brenneria rubrifaciens (97.6 % sequence similarity to the type strain). Multilocus sequence analysis based on four housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoB, infB and atpD) confirmed ...

 

Description of Gibbsiella quercinecans gen. nov., sp. nov., associated with Acute Oak Decline

  
Systematic and Applied Microbiology, Vol. 33, No. 8. (December 2010), pp. 444-450, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.syapm.2010.08.006

Abstract

Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains were consistently isolated from oak trees displaying symptoms of extensive stem bleeding. In Britain, this disorder is called Acute Oak Decline (AOD). A similar condition has been noted on species of Mediterranean oak in Spain. The identity of bacterial isolates from symptomatic trees in both countries was investigated using molecular techniques and phenotypic assays. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the strains were most closely related to the genera Serratia, Kluyvera, Klebsiella and Raoultella (all > ...

 

The Trees of Great Britain and Ireland Vol. 2

  
(1907)

Abstract

Elwes in conjunction with the botanist Henry described every species of tree then grown outdoors in the British Isles, and recorded the finest specimens then to be seen. Henry's contribution to the book was unique insofar as he devised a system of identification based on leaves and twigs and on the position of buds to aid identification even in the absence of fruit and flowers. Most of these were visited and recorded personally, a process which caused Elwes to wear out ...

 

Conservation of Black poplar (Populus nigra L.)

  
(2004)

Abstract

There is considerable interest in the need to conserve the 7000 trees which are all that remain of the population of black poplar growing in Britain. Recent work based on molecular techniques has provided markers which can unambiguously distinguish first generation hybrids of P. x euramericana from P. nigra. This is an important tool as it enables non-hybrid trees, which should be conserved, to be distinguished from exotic clones of hybrid poplars. Molecular markers have also demonstrated that the British population ...

 

Elm

  
(1983)
Keywords: monography   ulmus-spp   united-kingdom  

Abstract

Elm, one of the three principal landscape trees of England, differs from the others in its complex variability and its intricate relationship with human settlement. The book covers all its aspects: its history, its use and distribution by man from prehistoric times onwards, its vernacular names, the numerous organisms associated exclusively with it and its place in English literature and the visual arts. The book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the English landscape. It is of ...

 

Pests and Diseases

  
In Annual Report and Accounts 2001-2002 (January 2003), pp. 16-27

Abstract

It has long been recognised that climatic conditions influence the epidemiology and incidence of many pests and diseases. Now, with the growing acceptance that man’s activities are causing a gradual change in the global climate, there is an increasing need for research into the climate dependency of pathogen and insect outbreaks. Over the next century climate change is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on the environment and, in consequence, to alter the way we manage our forests and ...

 

Hatfield's Herbal: The Curious Stories of Britain's Wild Plants

  
(2009)

Abstract

Hatfield's Herbal is the story of how people all over Britain have used its wild plants throughout history, for reasons magical, mystical and medicinal. Gabrielle Hatfield has drawn on a lifetime's knowledge to describe the properties of over 150 native plants, and the customs that surround them: from predicting the weather with seaweed to using deadly nightshade to make ladies' pupils dilate appealingly, and from ensuring a husband's faithfulness with butterbur to warding off witches by planting a rowan tree. Filled ...

 

Forestry Statistics 2014

  
(2014)

Abstract

Forestry Statistics is a compilation of statistics on woodland, forestry and primary wood processing in the UK. Where possible, statistical information in this publication covers the whole of the United Kingdom, and is broken down to give figures for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. We would like to acknowledge the contribution of Natural Resources Wales and Northern Ireland's Forest Service in providing a wide range of statistics for this publication, which has made it possible to have more comprehensive coverage of ...

 

A botanical arrangement of all the vegetables naturally growing in Great Britain

  
Vol. 2 (1776)
 

The English Flora Vol. 4

  
(1830)
 

The Trees of Great Britain and Ireland Vol. 4

  
(1909)

Abstract

Elwes in conjunction with the botanist Henry described every species of tree then grown outdoors in the British Isles, and recorded the finest specimens then to be seen. Henry's contribution to the book was unique insofar as he devised a system of identification based on leaves and twigs and on the position of buds to aid identification even in the absence of fruit and flowers. Most of these were visited and recorded personally, a process which caused Elwes to wear out ...

 

Ecological effects of introduced tree species in Britain

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 31-42, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00487-4

Abstract

Non-native trees have been introduced to Britain and native trees have been redistributed for over 2000 years, but most species were introduced in the last 400 years, and the ecological consequences have not yet been fully manifested. Introduction has been followed by various forms of adaptation to British conditions: (i) genetic changes in the trees themselves, (ii) assimilation into forest communities, (iii) colonisation by native plants, animals and fungi and (iv) gradual cultural acceptance. Nevertheless, some naturalised shrubs are widely regarded ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/united-kingdom

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Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.