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Selection: with tag unexpected-effect [19 articles] 

 

Do not publish

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6340. (25 May 2017), pp. 800-801, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aan1362

Abstract

Biologists have long valued publishing detailed information on rare and endangered species. Until relatively recently, much of this information was accessible only through accessing specialized scientific journals in university libraries. However, much of these data have been transferred online with the advent of digital platforms and a rapid push to open-access publication. Information is increasingly also available online in public reports and wildlife atlases, and research published behind paywalls can often be found in the public domain. Increased data and information ...

 

How to fight corruption

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6340. (26 May 2017), pp. 803-804, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aan0815

Abstract

Anticorruption initiatives are often put forth as solutions to problems of waste and inefficiency in government programs. It's easy to see why. So often, somewhere along the chain that links the many participants in public service provision or other government activities, funds may get stolen or misdirected, bribes exchanged for preferential treatment, or genuine consumers of public services supplemented by “ghost” users. As a result, corruption reduces economic growth and leaves citizens disillusioned and distrustful of government (1). It is tempting ...

 

Basidiomycete yeasts in the cortex of ascomycete macrolichens

  
Science, Vol. 353, No. 6298. (21 July 2016), pp. 488-492, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf8287

Abstract

For over 140 years, lichens have been regarded as a symbiosis between a single fungus, usually an ascomycete, and a photosynthesizing partner. Other fungi have long been known to occur as occasional parasites or endophytes, but the one lichen–one fungus paradigm has seldom been questioned. Here we show that many common lichens are composed of the known ascomycete, the photosynthesizing partner, and, unexpectedly, specific basidiomycete yeasts. These yeasts are embedded in the cortex, and their abundance correlates with previously unexplained variations ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 37

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   tropics   trunk-sucker   tsuga-canadensis   tsuga-chinensis   tsuga-heterophylla   tsuga-mertensiana   tsuga-spp   tundra   turing-completeness   turkey   tuscany   tuta-absoluta   twig-dieback   two-dimensional-gas-chromatography   two-stage-peer-review   udig   ukraine   ulex-europaeus   ulmus   ulmus-americana   ulmus-carpinifolia   ulmus-glabra   ulmus-laevis   ulmus-minor   ulmus-parvifolia   ulmus-procera   ulmus-pumila   ulmus-rubra   ulmus-spp   ulmus-thomasii   umbellularia-californica   umbrella-species   uncertainty   uncertainty-propagation   underfitting   understorey   understorey-species   undisturbed-habitat   uneven-aged-forest   unexpected-effect   ungulate   ungulate-browsing   united-kingdom   united-states   universal-approximation   unknown   unrealistic-expectations   unsupervised-training   upper-treeline   uprooting   urban-areas   urban-forest   urban-habitats   urban-trees   urgent-hpc   url-decay   urocerus-gigas   ursus-arctos   usda   ushahidi   usle   usped   utilization   vaccination   vaccinium-myrtillus   vaccinium-oxycoccos   vaccinium-spp   vaccinium-uliginosum   vaccinium-vitis-idaea   vaccinum-myrtillus   validation   valsa-melanodiscus   variability   variable-selection   variance-partitioning   variation   vascular-plants   vascular-system   vauable   vegetation   vegetation-buffer   vegetation-changes   vegetation-composition   vegetation-diversity   vegetation-dynamics   vegetation-types   vegetative-propagation   veneer   venice   verification-vs-corroboration   veronica-officinalis   vertebrate   verticillium-dahliae   vgi   viburnum-lantana   viburnum-opalus   viburnum-opulus   viburnum-spp   vietnam  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Changes in climatic water balance drive downhill shifts in plant species' optimum elevations

  
Science, Vol. 331, No. 6015. (2011), pp. 324-327, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1199040

Abstract

Uphill shifts of species' distributions in response to historical warming are well documented, which leads to widespread expectations of continued uphill shifts under future warming. Conversely, downhill shifts are often considered anomalous and unrelated to climate change. By comparing the altitudinal distributions of 64 plant species between the 1930s and the present day within California, we show that climate changes have resulted in a significant downward shift in species' optimum elevations. This downhill shift is counter to what would be expected ...

 

Europe’s forest management did not mitigate climate warming

  
Science, Vol. 351, No. 6273. (2016), pp. 597-600, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aad7270

Abstract

[Europe's managed forests contribute to warming] For most of the past 250 years, surprisingly it seems that Europe's managed forests have been a net source of carbon, contributing to climate warming rather than mitigating it. Naudts et al. reconstructed the history of forest management in Europe in the context of a land-atmosphere model. The release of carbon otherwise stored in litter, dead wood, and soil carbon pools in managed forests was one key factor contributing to climate warming. Second, the conversion of ...

 

Observational articles: a tool to reconstruct ecological history based on chronicling unusual events

  
F1000Research, Vol. 2 (9 August 2013), 168, https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.2-168.v1

Abstract

Natural history is based on observations, whereas modern ecology is mostly based on experiments aimed at testing hypotheses, either in the field or in a computer. Furthermore, experiments often reveal generalities that are taken as norms. Ecology, however, is a historical discipline and history is driven by both regularities (deriving from norms) and irregularities, or contingencies, which occur when norms are broken. If only norms occured, there would be no history. The current disregard for the importance of contingencies and anecdotes ...

 

Rqc2p and 60S ribosomal subunits mediate mRNA-independent elongation of nascent chains

  
Science, Vol. 347, No. 6217. (02 January 2015), pp. 75-78, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1259724

Abstract

[Edotor's summary: Tagging truncated proteins with CAT tails] During the translation of a messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein, ribosomes can sometimes stall. Truncated proteins thus formed can be toxic to the cell and must be destroyed. Shen et al. show that the proteins Ltn1p and Rqc2p, subunits of the ribosome quality control complex, bind to the stalled and partially disassembled ribosome. Ltn1p, a ubiquitin ligase, binds near the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel on the ribosome, well placed to tag the truncated protein ...

 

Tree diversity does not always improve resistance of forest ecosystems to drought

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 41. (14 October 2014), pp. 14812-14815, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1411970111

Abstract

[Significance] In the context of climate change, expected drier and warmer environmental conditions will have drastic consequences on forest functions and services and may bring about important drought-induced die-off events. Biodiversity promotes forest ecosystem performance and resistance to insect pests and diseases, but whether or not diverse forests are also better adapted to deal with drought stress remains unknown. Within our study network of 160 forest stands across Europe, we found that mixed species forests are less exposed to drought stress ...

 

Don't blame the beetles

  
Science, Vol. 346, No. 6206. (10 October 2014), pp. 154-156, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.346.6206.154

Abstract

Tiny insects called bark beetles have devastated forests in western North America over the past decade. Life has drained from millions of hectares of forest so quickly that it seemed as if they had been abruptly unplugged, like a Christmas tree before bedtime. And many people have feared the infestation's fallout, worrying that the dry, beetle-killed trees would give birth to huge, damaging wildfires. Those concerns seemed to come true as spectacular blazes, such as the 2012 High Park Fire near ...

 

Temperature drives global patterns in forest biomass distribution in leaves, stems, and roots

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 38. (23 September 2014), pp. 13721-13726, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1216053111

Abstract

[Significance] Do forests in cold or dry climate zones distribute more resources in roots to enhance uptake of water and nutrients, which are scarce in such climates? Despite its importance to forest ecology and global carbon cycle modeling, this question is unanswered at present. To answer this question, we compiled and analyzed a large dataset (>6,200 forests, 61 countries) and determined that the proportion of total forest biomass in roots is greater and in foliage is smaller in increasingly cold climates. ...

 

Competitive interactions between forest trees are driven by species' trait hierarchy, not phylogenetic or functional similarity: implications for forest community assembly

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 15, No. 8. (August 2012), pp. 831-840, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01803.x

Abstract

The relative importance of competition vs. environmental filtering in the assembly of communities is commonly inferred from their functional and phylogenetic structure, on the grounds that similar species compete most strongly for resources and are therefore less likely to coexist locally. This approach ignores the possibility that competitive effects can be determined by relative positions of species on a hierarchy of competitive ability. Using growth data, we estimated 275 interaction coefficients between tree species in the French mountains. We show that ...

 

The influence of phylogenetic relatedness on species interactions among freshwater green algae in a mesocosm experiment

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 102, No. 5. (September 2014), pp. 1288-1299, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12271

Abstract

1. A long-standing hypothesis in ecology and evolutionary biology is that closely related species are more ecologically similar to each other and therefore compete more strongly than distant relatives do. A recent hypothesis posits that evolutionary relatedness may also explain the prevalence of mutualisms, with facilitative interactions being more common among distantly related species. Despite the importance of these hypotheses for understanding the structure and function of ecological communities, experimental tests to determine how evolutionary relatedness influences competition ...

 

Complex climate controls on 20th century oak growth in Central-West Germany

  
Tree Physiology, Vol. 29, No. 1. (01 January 2009), pp. 39-51, https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpn003

Abstract

We analyze interannual to multi-decadal growth variations of 555 oak trees from Central-West Germany. A network of 13 pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and 33 sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) site chronologies is compared with gridded temperature, precipitation, cloud-cover, vapor pressure and drought (i.e., Palmer Drought Severity Index, PDSI) fluctuations. A hierarchic cluster analysis identifies three groups for each oak species differentiated by ecologic settings. When high precipitation is primarily a characteristic for one Q. robur and one Q. petraea ...

 

Contrasting responses of mean and extreme snowfall to climate change

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7515. (27 August 2014), pp. 416-418, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13625

Abstract

Snowfall is an important element of the climate system, and one that is expected to change in a warming climate1, 2, 3, 4. Both mean snowfall and the intensity distribution of snowfall are important, with heavy snowfall events having particularly large economic and human impacts5, 6, 7. Simulations with climate models indicate that annual mean snowfall declines with warming in most regions but increases in regions with very low surface temperatures3, 4. The response of heavy snowfall events to a changing ...

 

Greater ecosystem carbon in the Mojave Desert after ten years exposure to elevated CO2

  
Nature Clim. Change, Vol. 4, No. 5. (6 May 2014), pp. 394-397, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2184

Abstract

Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas inducing climate change. Increased global CO2 emissions, estimated at 8.4 Pg C yr−1 at present, have accelerated from 1% yr−1 during 1990–1999 to 2.5% yr−1 during 2000–2009 (ref. 1). The carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems is the greatest unknown in the global C budget because the actual magnitude, location and causes of terrestrial sinks are uncertain2; estimates of terrestrial C uptake, therefore, are often based on the residuals between direct measurements of the atmospheric ...

 

Ecosystem properties and forest decline in contrasting long-term chronosequences

  
Science, Vol. 305, No. 5683. (23 July 2004), pp. 509-513, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1098778

Abstract

During succession, ecosystem development occurs; but in the long-term absence of catastrophic disturbance, a decline phase eventually follows. We studied six long-term chronosequences, in Australia, Sweden, Alaska, Hawaii, and New Zealand; for each, the decline phase was associated with a reduction in tree basal area and an increase in the substrate nitrogen–to-phosphorus ratio, indicating increasing phosphorus limitation over time. These changes were often associated with reductions in litter decomposition rates, phosphorus release from litter, and biomass and activity of decomposer microbes. ...

 

Insect-resistant transgenic plants in a multi-trophic context

  
The Plant Journal, Vol. 31, No. 4. (1 August 2002), pp. 387-406, https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-313x.2002.01366.x

Abstract

So far, genetic engineering of plants in the context of insect pest control has involved insertion of genes that code for toxins, and may be characterized as the incorporation of biopesticides into classical plant breeding. In the context of pesticide usage in pest control, natural enemies of herbivores have received increasing attention, because carnivorous arthropods are an important component of insect pest control. However, in plant breeding programmes, natural enemies of herbivores have largely been ignored, although there are many examples ...

 

Impacts of genetically engineered crops on pesticide use in the U.S. -- the first sixteen years

  
Environmental Sciences Europe, Vol. 24, No. 1. (2012), 24, https://doi.org/10.1186/2190-4715-24-24

Abstract

Background. Genetically engineered, herbicide-resistant and insect-resistant crops have been remarkable commercial successes in the United States. Few independent studies have calculated their impacts on pesticide use per hectare or overall pesticide use, or taken into account the impact of rapidly spreading glyphosate-resistant weeds. A model was developed to quantify by crop and year the impacts of six major transgenic pest-management traits on pesticide use in the U.S. over the 16-year period, 1996–2011: herbicide-resistant corn, soybeans, and cotton; Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn targeting ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/unexpected-effect

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.