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Selection: with tag technology-mediated-communication [62 articles] 

 

Beyond ∖newcommand with xparse

  
TUGboat, Vol. 31, No. 1. (2010), pp. 80-83

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] The LATEX 2ε \newcommand macro is most LATEX users’ first choice for creating macros. As well as the ‘sanity checks’ it carries out, the ability to define macros with an optional argument is very useful. However, to go beyond using a single optional argument, or to create more complex input syntaxes, LATEX 2ε users have to do things ‘by hand’ using \def or load one of the packages which extend \newcommand (for example twoopt (Oberdiek, 2008)). [\n] As part of the ...

 

Escape from the impact factor

  
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics, Vol. 8, No. 1. (2008), pp. 5-7

Abstract

As Editor-in-Chief of the journal Nature, I am concerned by the tendency within academic administrations to focus on a journal’s impact factor when judging the worth of scientific contributions by researchers, affecting promotions, recruitment and, in some countries, financial bonuses for each paper. Our own internal research demonstrates how a high journal impact factor can be the skewed result of many citations of a few papers rather than the average level of the majority, reducing its value as an objective measure ...

 

A concise review on the role of author self-citations in information science, bibliometrics and science policy

  
Scientometrics, Vol. 67, No. 2. (2006), pp. 263-277, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-006-0098-9

Abstract

The objective of the present study is twofold: (1) to show the aims and means of quantitative interpretation of bibliographic features in bibliometrics and their re-interpretation in research policy, and (2) to summarise the state-of-art in self-citation research. The authors describe three approaches to the role of author self-citations and possible conflicts arising from the different perspectives. From the bibliometric viewpoint we can conclude that that there is no reason for condemning self-citations in general or for removing them from macro ...

 

Citizen science application - Invasive Alien Species in Europe

  

Abstract

The JRC, within the framework of MYGEOSS initiative devoted to citizen science, has developed an application for Apple and Android smartphone devices called “Invasive Alien Species Europe”, which allows users to report the presence of the 37 species currently listed as Invasive Alien Species (IAS) of Union concern (EU Regulation 1143/2014) on the European territory. User friendly factsheets and pictures guide the user towards the species likely to have been observed. Once validated, data will be fed into the European Alien ...

 

The importance of free and open source software and open standards in modern scientific publishing

  
Publications, Vol. 1, No. 2. (26 June 2013), pp. 49-55, https://doi.org/10.3390/publications1020049

Abstract

In this paper we outline the reasons why we believe a reliance on the use of proprietary computer software and proprietary file formats in scientific publication have negative implications for the conduct and reporting of science. There is increasing awareness and interest in the scientific community about the benefits offered by free and open source software. We discuss the present state of scientific publishing and the merits of advocating for a wider adoption of open standards in science, particularly where it ...

 

To slow or not? Challenges in subsecond networks

  
Science, Vol. 355, No. 6327. (23 February 2017), pp. 801-802, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aai8618

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] today's electronic exchanges are an all-machine playing field with extreme subsecond operating times that lie far beyond the ∼1-s real-time response and intervention of any human. High-speed algorithms now receive, process, and respond to information on the scale of microseconds, and the only guaranteed future speed barrier is the speed of light. Hundreds of orders are executed across multiple exchange nodes within 1 ms (millisecond). [...] The need to develop a systems-level understanding concerning regulation in subsecond networks, is ...

 

When a preprint becomes the final paper

  

Abstract

A geneticist's decision not to publish his finalized preprint in a journal gets support from scientists online. [Excerpt] Preprint papers posted on servers such as arXiv and bioRxiv are designed to get research results out for discussion before they are formally peer reviewed and published in journals. But for some scientists, the term is now a misnomer — their preprint papers will never be submitted for formal publication. [...] One of the major services of traditional journals is that papers are peer ...

 

Chilling effects: online surveillance and Wikipedia use

  
Berkeley Technology Law Journal, Vol. 31, No. 1. (2016), 117

Abstract

This article discusses the results of the first empirical study providing evidence of regulatory “chilling effects” of Wikipedia users associated with online government surveillance. The study explores how traffic to Wikipedia articles on topics that raise privacy concerns for Wikipedia users decreased after the widespread publicity about NSA/PRISM surveillance revelations in June 2013. Using an interdisciplinary research design, the study tests the hypothesis, based on chilling effects theory, that traffic to privacy-sensitive Wikipedia articles reduced after the mass surveillance revelations. The ...

 

Take the time and effort to correct misinformation

  
Nature, Vol. 540, No. 7632. (6 December 2016), pp. 171-171, https://doi.org/10.1038/540171a

Abstract

Scientists should challenge online falsehoods and inaccuracies — and harness the collective power of the Internet to fight back, argues Phil Williamson. [Excerpt] [...] Most researchers who have tried to engage online with ill-informed journalists or pseudoscientists will be familiar with Brandolini’s law (also known as the Bullshit Asymmetry Principle): the amount of energy needed to refute bullshit is an order of magnitude bigger than that needed to produce it. Is it really worth taking the time and effort to challenge, correct and clarify ...

 

Towards a web-based collaborative weighting method in project

  
In IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (2002), 6, https://doi.org/10.1109/icsmc.2002.1173335

Abstract

For the purpose of a product design or a project in general, weighting a set of comparable criteria has been proven to be of utmost importance (e.g. weighting product functions in value analysis - VA -, and allocating a budget in a Design-To-Cost project). Moreover the weighting problem is related to basic properties in the field of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) through the notions of ordinal transitivity and rationality in the designers' mind. How should designers or project agents decide in ...

 

ePiX tutorial and reference manual

  
(2008)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] ePiX, a collection of batch utilities, creates mathematically accurate figures, plots, and animations containing LATEX typography. The input syntax is easy to learn, and the user interface resembles that of LATEX itself: You prepare a scene description in a text editor, then “compile” the input file into a picture. LATEX- and web-compatible output types include a LATEX picture-like environment written with PSTricks, tikz, or eepic macros; vector images (eps, ps, and pdf); and bitmapped images and movies (png, mng, and gif). [\n] ePiX’s strengths include: [::] Quality of ...

 

The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship

  
Scientific Data, Vol. 3 (15 March 2016), sdata201618, https://doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.18

Abstract

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders—representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers—have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, ...

 

'We're going backward!'

  
Communication of the ACM, Vol. 59, No. 10. (September 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1145/2993746

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] As we move toward the present, the media of our expression seems to have decreasing longevity. Of course, newer media have not been around as long as the older ones so their longevity has not been demonstrated but I think it is arguable that the more recent media do not have the resilience of stone or baked clay. Modern photographs may not last more than 150–200 years before they fade or disintegrate. Modern books, unless archival paper is used, ...

 

JRC data policy

  
Vol. 27163 EN (2015), https://doi.org/10.2788/607378

Abstract

[Executive summary] The work on the JRC Data Policy followed the task identified in the JRC Management Plan 2014 to develop a dedicated data policy to complement the JRC Policy on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Supporting Guidance, and to promote open access to research data in the context of Horizon 2020. [\n] Important policy commitments and the relevant regulatory basis within the European Union and the European Commission include: the Commission Decision on the reuse of Commission documents, Commission ...

 

Opinion: science in the age of selfies

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 34. (23 August 2016), pp. 9384-9387, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1609793113

Abstract

[Excerpt] [\n] [...] [\n] Here there is a paradox: Today, there are many more scientists, and much more money is spent on research, yet the pace of fundamental innovation, the kinds of theories and engineering practices that will feed the pipeline of future progress, appears, to some observers, including us, to be slowing [...]. Why might that be the case? [\n] One argument is that “theoretical models” may not even exist for some branches of science, at least not in the ...

 

Why doesn't your model pass information to mine?

  
In Workshop on Digital Mapping Techniques 2009 (2009)

Abstract

For several decades geologists have been making three-dimensional (3D) models. Various proprietary and open software tools have been developed which allow geoscientists to produce reasonable 3D representation of the geological system that they are studying. The model they produce is quite often an ‘island’ of independent information. For a long time this didn't matter as there were so few models that there were unlikely to be any adjacent models forming islands in the same sea area. However, that is changing, the ...

 

The SmartH2O project and the role of social computing in promoting efficient residential water use: a first analysis

  
In Proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software, June 15-19, San Diego, California, USA (2014)

Abstract

SmartH2O is an EU funded project which aims at creating a virtuous feedback cycle between water users and the utilities, providing users information on their consumption in quasi real time, and thus enabling water utilities to plan and implement strategies to reduce/reallocate water consumption. Traditional metering data, usually gathered twice a year, can be used to model consumers’ behaviour at an aggregate level, but the motivations and individual attitudes of consumers are hidden. The advent of smart water meters allows gathering high frequency consumption data that ...

 

The past, present and future of the PhD thesis

  
Nature, Vol. 535, No. 7610. (6 July 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1038/535007a

Abstract

Writing a PhD thesis is a personal and professional milestone for many researchers. But the process needs to change with the times. [Excerpt] According to one of those often-quoted statistics that should be true but probably isn’t, the average number of people who read a PhD thesis all the way through is 1.6. And that includes the author. More interesting might be the average number of PhD theses that the typical scientist — and reader of Nature — has read from start ...

 

Do voting advice applications have an effect on electoral participation and voter turnout? Evidence from the 2007 Swiss federal elections

  
In Electronic Participation, Vol. 6229 (2010), pp. 211-224, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15158-3_18

Abstract

Voting Advice Applications (VAAs) render a valuable platform for tackling one of democracy’s central challenges: low voter turnout. Studies indicate that lack of information and cost-benefit considerations cause voters to abstain from voting. VAAs are online voting assistance tools which match own political preferences with those of candidates and parties in elections. By assisting voters in their decision-making process prior to casting their votes, VAAs not only rebut rational choice reasoning against voting but also narrow existing information gaps. In this ...

 

Software search is not a science, even among scientists

  
(8 May 2016)

Abstract

When they seek software for a task, how do people go about finding it? Past research found that searching the Web, asking colleagues, and reading papers have been the predominant approaches---but is it still true today, given the popularity of Facebook, Stack Overflow, GitHub, and similar sites? In addition, when users do look for software, what criteria do they use? And finally, if resources such as improved software catalogs were to be developed, what kind of information would people want in them? These questions motivated our cross-sectional survey ...

 

Promoting research resource identification at JCN

  
Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 522, No. 8. (01 June 2014), pp. 1707-1707, https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.23585

Abstract

[Excerpt] [\n] [...] [\n] The attention of scientists, editors, and policymakers alike have all turned recently to the issue of reproducibility in scientific research, focusing on research spanning from the pharmaceutical industry (Begley and Ellis, 2012) to the highest levels of government (Collins and Tabak, 2014; see also McNutt, 2014). While these commentaries point out that scientific misconduct is quite rare, they do point to a confluence of factors that hinder the reproducibility of scientific findings, including the identification of key reagents, such ...

 

The Resource Identification Initiative: a cultural shift in publishing

  
Neuroinformatics, Vol. 14, No. 2. (2016), pp. 169-182, https://doi.org/10.1007/s12021-015-9284-3

Abstract

A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to identify the exact resources that are reported or to answer basic questions such as “How did other studies use resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 35

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   supply-chain   support-vector-machines   supporting-services   surface-roughness   surprise   survey   survival   susceptibility   sustainability   sustainable-development   sustainable-forest   sustainable-forest-management   sustainable-forestry   sweden   swietenia-macrophylla   swiss   switzerland   syagrus-romanzoffiana   sycamore   symbiosis   symphoricarpos-albus   symphoricarpos-spp   symphytum-tauricum   symptoms   synergy   synonyms   syntax-vs-semantics   syntaxonomy   system   system-catastrophe   system-dynamics   system-engineering   system-of-systems   system-theory   systematics   syzygium-aromaticum   syzygium-cumini   tabebuia-chrysantha   tabebuia-heterophylla   tamarindus-indica   tamarix-canariensis   tamarix-chinensis   tamarix-kotschyi   tamarix-mascatensis   tamarix-nilotica   tamarix-octandra   tamarix-parviflora   tamarix-ramosissima   tamarix-spp   tamarix-tetragyna   tamarix-tetrandra   taper-curve   taphrorychus-bicolor   tasmania   taxa   taxine   taxodium-distichum   taxodium-mucronatum   taxodium-spp   taxol   taxon-specific-parameters   taxonomy   taxus-baccata   taxus-brevifolia   taxus-spp   team-diversity   technocracy   technology   technology-mediated-communication   tecoma-stans   tectona-grandis   tectonic   temperate-climate   temperate-continental-forest   temperate-europe   temperate-forest   temperate-mountain-system   temperate-trees   temperature   temperature-change   temperature-range   tensile-root-strength   terminalia-catappa   terminalia-superba   terminology   terpenes   terra-modis   terrain-ruggedness-index   terrestrial-earth-surface   terrestrial-lidar   terseness   tertiary   tetraclinis-articulata   tetraclinis-salicornioides   tetropium-castaneum   text-editors   thailand   thanasimus-formicarius   thaumetopoea-pityocampa  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Quantifying seasonal population fluxes driving rubella transmission dynamics using mobile phone data

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 35. (01 September 2015), pp. 11114-11119, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1423542112

Abstract

[Significance] Changing patterns of human mobility can drive seasonal outbreaks of infectious diseases, but limited data about travel behavior and population flux over time have made this idea difficult to quantify. Mobile phone data provide a unique source of information about human travel. Here we quantify seasonal travel patterns using mobile phone data from nearly 15 million anonymous subscribers in Kenya. Using a rich data source of rubella incidence, we show that patterns of population fluxes inferred from mobile phone data are ...

 

License compatibility and relicensing

  
In Licenses (2016)

Abstract

If you want to combine two free programs into one, or merge code from one into the other, this raises the question of whether their licenses allow combining them. [\n] There is no problem merging programs that have the same license, if it is a reasonably behaved license, as nearly all free licenses are.(*) [\n] What then when the licenses are different? In general we say that several licenses are compatible if there is a way to merge code under those various licenses ...

 

GNU Coding Standards

  
(2015)

Abstract

[Excerpt: About the GNU Coding Standards] The GNU Coding Standards were written by Richard Stallman and other GNU Project volunteers. Their purpose is to make the GNU system clean, consistent, and easy to install. This document can also be read as a guide to writing portable, robust and reliable programs. It focuses on programs written in C, but many of the rules and principles are useful even if you write in another programming language. The rules often state reasons for writing ...

 

The unsung heroes of scientific software

  
Nature, Vol. 529, No. 7584. (4 January 2016), pp. 115-116, https://doi.org/10.1038/529115a

Abstract

Creators of computer programs that underpin experiments don’t always get their due — so the website Depsy is trying to track the impact of research code. [Excerpt] For researchers who code, academic norms for tracking the value of their work seem grossly unfair. They can spend hours contributing to software that underpins research, but if that work does not result in the authorship of a research paper and accompanying citations, there is little way to measure its impact. [\n] [...] Depsy’s creators hope that their ...

 

Resource disambiguator for the web: extracting biomedical resources and their citations from the scientific literature

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 1. (5 January 2016), e0146300, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0146300

Abstract

The NIF Registry developed and maintained by the Neuroscience Information Framework is a cooperative project aimed at cataloging research resources, e.g., software tools, databases and tissue banks, funded largely by governments and available as tools to research scientists. Although originally conceived for neuroscience, the NIF Registry has over the years broadened in the scope to include research resources of general relevance to biomedical research. The current number of research resources listed by the Registry numbers over 13K. The broadening in scope ...

 

Research integrity: don't let transparency damage science

  
Nature, Vol. 529, No. 7587. (25 January 2016), pp. 459-461, https://doi.org/10.1038/529459a

Abstract

Stephan Lewandowsky and Dorothy Bishop explain how the research community should protect its members from harassment, while encouraging the openness that has become essential to science. [Excerpt] Transparency has hit the headlines. In the wake of evidence that many research findings are not reproducible1, the scientific community has launched initiatives to increase data sharing, transparency and open critique. As with any new development, there are unintended consequences. Many measures that can improve science2 — shared data, post-publication peer review and public engagement ...

 

Wikipedians reach out to academics

  

Abstract

London conference discusses efforts by the online encyclopaedia to enlist the help of scientists. [Excerpt] Wikipedia is among the most frequently visited websites in the world, and one of the most popular places to tap into the world’s scientific and medical information. But scientists themselves are generally wary of it, because it can be edited by anyone, regardless of their level of expertise. At a meeting in London last week, the non-profit website’s volunteer editors reached out to scientists to enlist their help ...

 

Annotating the scholarly web

  
Nature, Vol. 528, No. 7580. (1 December 2015), pp. 153-154, https://doi.org/10.1038/528153a

Abstract

Scientific publishers are forging links with an organization that wants scientists to scribble comments over online research papers. [Excerpt] Would researchers scrawl notes, critiques and comments across online research papers if software made the annotation easy for them? Dan Whaley, founder of the non-profit organization Hypothes.is, certainly thinks so. [\n] Whaley's start-up company has built an open-source software platform for web annotations that allows users to highlight text or to comment on any web page or PDF file. And on 1 December, Hypothes.is announced ...

 

Licences named authority lists

  
(October 2015)

Abstract

[Excerpt] This table provides the European Commission Reuse Notice and a list of standard licences available internationally [Codes and concepts] [::Authority code] [::Status] current|deprecated [::Acronym] more specific than the authority code [::Label] full name of the licence [::Date of event] [::Description] [::] Date of description [::] Description [::] Provenance [::Predecessor] an authority code [::Successor] an authority code ...

 

Legal notices and copyright

  
(March 2015)

Abstract

[Excerpt] In general terms, all works such as publications or documents issued by the European Union institutions and bodies, irrespective of the medium, are subject to copyright, whether or not this is explicitly stated, except for works excluded from copyright protection by the relevant applicable law because they do not meet the legal requirements for protection or even if they do, they are subject to legal exceptions. The Internet increasing the potential audience of works displayed online and disseminated through the European ...

 

Copyright notice

  
(December 2015)

Abstract

[Excerpt] A general copyright notice is included in the "Legal notice" service which defines the limits of responsibility and draws attention to the copyright restrictions of EUROPA. It is a legal requirement to display it at the top of every page. [Copyright notice for European Commission websites] [\n] © European Union, 1995-2013 [\n] Reuse is authorised, provided the source is acknowledged. The reuse policy of the European Commission is implemented by a Decision of 12 December 2011pdf. [\n] The general principle of reuse can be subject ...

 

ColorBrewer.org: an online tool for selecting colour schemes for maps

  
The Cartographic Journal, Vol. 40, No. 1. (June 2003), pp. 27-37, https://doi.org/10.1179/000870403235002042

Abstract

Choosing effective colour schemes for thematic maps is surprisingly difficult. ColorBrewer is an online tool designed to take some of the guesswork out of this process by helping users select appropriate colour schemes for their specific mapping needs by considering: the number of data classes; the nature of their data (matched with sequential, diverging and qualitative schemes); and the end-use environment for the map (e.g., CRT, LCD, printed, projected, photocopied). ColorBrewer contains 'learn more' tutorials to help guide users, prompts them ...

 

Dealing with femtorisks in international relations

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 49. (09 December 2014), pp. 17356-17362, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1400229111

Abstract

The contemporary global community is increasingly interdependent and confronted with systemic risks posed by the actions and interactions of actors existing beneath the level of formal institutions, often operating outside effective governance structures. Frequently, these actors are human agents, such as rogue traders or aggressive financial innovators, terrorists, groups of dissidents, or unauthorized sources of sensitive or secret information about government or private sector activities. In other instances, influential “actors” take the form of climate change, communications technologies, or socioeconomic globalization. ...

 

MediaWiki

  
(2009)

Abstract

Though it appears simple to use at first glance, MediaWiki has extraordinarily powerful and deep capabilities for managing and organizing knowledge. In corporate environments, MediaWiki can transform the way teams write and collaborate. This comprehensive book covers MediaWiki's rich (and sometimes subtle) features, helping you become a wiki expert in no time. You'll learn how to: Find your way around by effective searching and browsing; Create and edit articles, categories, and user preferences; Use advanced features for authors, such as templates, ...

 

Ten Simple Rules for Better Figures

  
PLOS Computational Biology, Vol. 10, No. 9. (11 September 2014), e1003833, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003833

Abstract

Scientific visualization is classically defined as the process of graphically displaying scientific data. However, this process is far from direct or automatic. There are so many different ways to represent the same data: scatter plots, linear plots, bar plots, and pie charts, to name just a few. Furthermore, the same data, using the same type of plot, may be perceived very differently depending on who is looking at the figure. A more accurate definition for scientific visualization would be a graphical ...

 

Putting humans in the loop: Social computing for Water Resources Management

  
Environmental Modelling & Software, Vol. 37 (November 2012), pp. 68-77, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2012.03.002

Abstract

The advent of online services, social networks, crowdsourcing, and serious Web games has promoted the emergence of a novel computation paradigm, where complex tasks are solved by exploiting the capacity of human beings and computer platforms in an integrated way. Water Resources Management systems can take advantage of human and social computation in several ways: collecting and validating data, complementing the analytic knowledge embodied in models with tacit knowledge from individuals and communities, using human sensors to monitor the variation of ...

 

Computer support for environmental impact assessment: proceedings of the IFIP TC5/WG5.11 Working Conference on Computer Support for Environmental Impact Assessment, CSEIA 93, Como, Italy, 6-8 October, 1993

  
(1994)

Abstract

Any choice with a significant impact on the environment should, in principle, be the outcome of a political process reflecting the social preferences of everyone involved. Unfortunately, this ideal procedure requires a level of time and money that does not justify its application for planning each specific intervention. Different methods, mainly derived from traditional investment analyses, have been proposed for providing a rational basis for environmental decisions that cannot be analysed through a public debate. These methods have proved inadequate, however, ...

 

Environmental decision support systems

  
(1989)
 

Five years from now, CMOs will spend more on IT than CIOs do

  
(2014)

Abstract

[Excerpt] Marketing is now a fundamental driver of IT purchasing, and that trend shows no signs of stopping –or even slowing down –any time soon. In fact, Gartner analyst Laura McLellan recently predicted that by 2017, CMOs will spend more on IT than their counterpart CIOs. At first, that prediction may sound a bit over the top. (In just five years from now, CMOs are going to be spending more on IT than CIOs do?) But, consider this: 1) As ...

 

Digital diaspora in the enterprise: arrival of the CDO and CCO

  
(2014)

Abstract

While the C-suite sometimes seems too crowded today, it's also clear that technology is underrepresented in the leadership circle as digital in all its forms deeply infuses the modern organization. ...

 

Online collaboration: scientists and the social network

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7513. (13 August 2014), pp. 126-129, https://doi.org/10.1038/512126a

Abstract

Giant academic social networks have taken off to a degree that no one expected even a few years ago. A Nature survey explores why. ...

 

Environmental model access and interoperability: the GEO Model Web initiative

  
Environmental Modelling & Software, Vol. 39 (January 2013), pp. 214-228, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2012.03.007

Abstract

The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Model Web initiative utilizes a Model as a Service approach to increase model access and sharing. It relies on gradual, organic growth leading towards dynamic webs of interacting models, analogous to the World Wide Web. The long term vision is for a consultative infrastructure that can help address “what if” and other questions that decision makers and other users have. Four basic principles underlie the Model Web: open access, minimal barriers to entry, service-driven, and ...

 

A Multi-Language Computing Environment for Literate Programming and Reproducible Research

  
Journal of Statistical Software, Vol. 46, No. 3. (2012)

Abstract

We present a new computing environment for authoring mixed natural and computer language documents. In this environment a single hierarchically-organized plain text source file may contain a variety of elements such as code in arbitrary programming languages, raw data, links to external resources, project management data, working notes, and text for publication. Code fragments may be executed in situ with graphical, numerical and textual output captured or linked in the file. Export to LATEX, HTML, LATEX beamer, DocBook and other formats ...

 

Link decay in leading information science journals

  
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 58, No. 1. (01 January 2007), pp. 15-24, https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.20513

Abstract

Web citations have become common in scholarly publications as the amount of online literature increases. Yet, such links are not persistent and many decay over time, causing accessibility problems for readers. The present study investigates the link decay phenomenon in three leading information science journals. Articles spanning a period of 7 years (1997-2003) were downloaded, and their links were extracted. From these, a measure of link decay, the half-life, was computed to be approximately 5 years, which compares favorably against other ...

 

Accessibility and decay of web citations in five open access ISI journals

  
Internet Research, Vol. 22, No. 2. (2012), pp. 234-247, https://doi.org/10.1108/10662241211214584

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to scrutinize the accessibility and decay of web references (URLs) cited in five open access social sciences journals indexed by ISI. Design/methodology/approach – After acquiring all the papers published by these journals during 2002-2007, their web citations were extracted and analyzed from an accessibility point of view. Moreover, for initially missed citations complementary pathways such as using Internet Explorer and the Google search engine were employed. Findings – The study revealed that at first check ...

 

URL decay in MEDLINE—a 4-year follow-up study

  
Bioinformatics, Vol. 24, No. 11. (01 June 2008), pp. 1381-1385, https://doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btn127

Abstract

Motivation: Internet-based electronic resources, as given by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), are being increasingly used in scientific publications but are also becoming inaccessible in a time-dependant manner, a phenomenon documented across disciplines. Initial reports brought attention to the problem, spawning methods of effectively preserving URL content while some journals adopted policies regarding URL publication and begun storing supplementary information on journal websites. Thus, a reexamination of URL growth and decay in the literature is merited to see if the problem has ...

 

The Misguided Silver Bullet: What XML will and will NOT do to help Information Integration

  
Social Science Research Network Working Paper Series (14 November 2001), https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.281823

Abstract

The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) offers many important benefits and improvements over its predecessor, HTML. But, articles have appeared about XML with exaggerated claims of it being a "Rosetta Stone" with "miraculuous ways" to almost automatically provide information integration. These claims are actually being believed by some executives. It is almost surprising that no one has claimed that XML can cure cancer and provide world peace! In reality, XML must face many of the same challenges that plagued Electronic ...

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Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/technology-mediated-communication

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Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.