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Selection: with tag soil-carbon [22 articles] 

 

How have past fire disturbances contributed to the current carbon balance of boreal ecosystems?

  
Biogeosciences, Vol. 13, No. 3. (04 February 2016), pp. 675-690, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-675-2016

Abstract

Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these different effects on the current-day pan-boreal (44–84° N) carbon balance and quantifying relative contributions of legacy sinks by past fires is important for understanding and predicting the carbon dynamics in this region. Here we used the global dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE–SPITFIRE (Organising Carbon and ...

 

The charcoal vision: a win–win–win scenario for simultaneously producing bioenergy, permanently sequestering carbon, while improving soil and water quality

  
Agronomy Journal, Vol. 100, No. 1. (2008), 178, https://doi.org/10.2134/agrojnl2007.0161

Abstract

Processing biomass through a distributed network of fast pyrolyzers may be a sustainable platform for producing energy from biomass. Fast pyrolyzers thermally transform biomass into bio-oil, syngas, and charcoal. The syngas could provide the energy needs of the pyrolyzer. Bio-oil is an energy raw material (∼17 MJ kg−1) that can be burned to generate heat or shipped to a refinery for processing into transportation fuels. Charcoal could also be used to generate energy; however, application of the charcoal co-product to soils ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 33

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   silviculture   similarity   simple-sequence-repeats   simulation   single-nucleotide-polymorphism   sismic-hazard   site-quality   sitka-spruce   situational-awareness   slope   slope-stability   slovakia   slovenia   slovenian-alps   smoke   smooth-transition   smyrnium-perfoliatum   snow   snow-avalances   so2   soc   social-engineering-risk   social-learning   social-media   social-system   society   socratea-exorrhiza   sodium   soft-constraint   soft-systems-approach   softw   software-control   software-engineering   software-errors   software-evolution   software-evolvability   software-libraries   software-patents   software-quality   software-security   software-uncertainty   software-validity   software-verification   soil   soil-carbon   soil-compactation   soil-conditions   soil-erosion   soil-evolution   soil-fertility   soil-food   soil-formation   soil-hydrophobicity   soil-loss   soil-microbial-properties   soil-moisture   soil-pollution   soil-resources   soil-restoration   soil-sealing   soil-stabilization   soils   solanum-dulcamara   solanum-spp   solar-energy   solar-radiation   solid-phase-microextraction   sonneratia-apetala   soot   sophora-chrysophylla   sophora-secundiflora   sophora-spp   sorbus-aria   sorbus-aucuparia   sorbus-domestica   sorbus-intermedia   sorbus-spp   sorbus-torminalis   sorex-spp   south-america   south-asia   southeast-asia   southeastern-europe   southern-africa   southern-alps   southern-asia   southern-europe   southern-oscillation   spain   spartium-junceum   spathodea-campanulata   spatial-analysis   spatial-disaggregation   spatial-ecology   spatial-interpolation   spatial-pattern   spatial-prioritization   spatial-resolution   spatial-spread  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Soil carbon sequestration impacts on global climate change and food security

  
Science, Vol. 304, No. 5677. (2004), pp. 1623-1627, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1097396

Abstract

The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon. The rate of soil organic carbon sequestration with adoption of recommended technologies depends on soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature, farming system, and soil management. Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, ...

 

Sustainable land use in the European Union

  
CULTIVAR Cadernos de Análise e Prospetiva, Vol. 2 (2015), pp. 13-20

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] Soil is defined as the top layer of the earth’s crust. It is formed by mineral particles, organic matter, water, air and living organisms. In fact, soil is an extremely complex, variable and living medium. It can be considered essentially as a non-renewable resource since soil formation is an extremely slow process. Soil provides us with food, biomass and raw materials. It serves as a platform for human activities and landscape. It is also an archive of heritage and plays ...

References

  1. European Commission, 2006. Commission staff working document - Document accompanying the Communication from the Commission to the Council, The European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection - Impact assessment of the thematic strategy on soil protection. Commission Staff Working Document 2006 (SEC/2006/0620).
  2. Fenn, T., Fleet, D., Garrett, L., Daly, E., Elding, C., Hartman, M., Udo, J., 2014. Study on Economic and
 

Soil carbon stocks and their variability across the forests, shrublands and grasslands of peninsular Spain

  
Biogeosciences, Vol. 10, No. 12. (2013), pp. 8353-8361, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-10-8353-2013
Keywords: soc   soil-carbon   spain  

Abstract

Accurate estimates of C stocks and fluxes of soil organic carbon (SOC) are needed to assess the impact of climate and land use change on soil C uptake and soil C emissions to the atmosphere. Here, we present an assessment of SOC stocks in forests, shrublands and grasslands of peninsular Spain based on field measurements in more than 900 soil profiles. SOC to a depth of 1 m was modelled as a function of vegetation cover, mean annual temperature, total annual ...

 

Storage and drivers of organic carbon in forest soils of southeast Germany (Bavaria) – Implications for carbon sequestration

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 295 (May 2013), pp. 162-172, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.01.025

Abstract

[Abstract] Temperate forest soils of central Europe are regarded as important pools for soil organic carbon (SOC) and thought to have a high potential for carbon (C) sequestration. However, comprehensive data on total SOC storage, particularly under different forest types, and its drivers is limited. In this study, we analyzed a forest data set of 596 completely sampled soil profiles down to the parent material or to a depth of 1 m within Bavaria in southeast Germany in order to determine representative ...

 

Amount, distribution and driving factors of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in cropland and grassland soils of southeast Germany (Bavaria)

  
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Vol. 176 (August 2013), pp. 39-52, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2013.05.012

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Drivers and distribution of agricultural SOC and N stocks of Bavaria were analyzed. [::] SOC differences between cropland and grassland are related to subsoil C. [::] Soil moisture controls SOC and N, temperature/precipitation are of minor importance. [::] Cropland and grassland soils in Bavaria store 242 and 134 Mt SOC and 19 and 12 Mt N. [::] For C sequestration soil types and topography are more important than land use. [Abstract] Agricultural soils have a high potential for sequestration of atmospheric carbon due to their volume ...

 

Influences of evergreen gymnosperm and deciduous angiosperm tree species on the functioning of temperate and boreal forests

  
Biological Reviews, Vol. 90, No. 2. (1 May 2015), pp. 444-466, https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12119

Abstract

It has been recognized for a long time that the overstorey composition of a forest partly determines its biological and physical–chemical functioning. Here, we review evidence of the influence of evergreen gymnosperm (EG) tree species and deciduous angiosperm (DA) tree species on the water balance, physical–chemical soil properties and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. We used scientific publications based on experimental designs where all species grew on the same parent material and initial soil, and were similar in stage of ...

 

Tree species is the major factor explaining C:N ratios in European forest soils

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 311 (January 2014), pp. 3-16, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.06.047

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] C:N ratio in forest floor, peat and mineral topsoil mainly depend on tree species. [::] Most important differences in C:N ratios are seen between deciduous and evergreen species. [::] Either soil type, ecoregion or humus type was the second most important explanatory factor. [::] There was no consistent relationship between modelled deposition and C:N ratios. [Abstract] The C:N ratio is considered as an indicator of nitrate leaching in response to high atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. However, the C:N ratio is influenced by a multitude of ...

 

Greenhouse gas emissions from managed peat soils: is the IPCC reporting guidance realistic?

  
Mires and Peat, Vol. 8 (2011), 2

Abstract

Drainage of peatlands leads to the decomposition of peat, resulting in substantial losses of carbon and nitrogen to the atmosphere. The conservation and restoration of peatlands can provide a major contribution to the mitigation of climate change. Improvements to guidance and capacity for reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from peatlands will be valuable in the context of the current negotiations towards a post-2012 climate agreement. This article evaluates IPCC approaches to greenhouse gas emissions from managed organic (peat) soils and presents ...

 

Mycorrhiza-mediated competition between plants and decomposers drives soil carbon storage

  
Nature, Vol. 505, No. 7484. (08 January 2014), pp. 543-545, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature12901

Abstract

Soil contains more carbon than the atmosphere and vegetation combined. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the accumulation and stability of soil carbon is critical to predicting the Earth’s future climate. Recent studies suggest that decomposition of soil organic matter is often limited by nitrogen availability to microbes and that plants, via their fungal symbionts, compete directly with free-living decomposers for nitrogen. Ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal (EEM) fungi produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes, allowing them greater access to organic nitrogen sources than arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) ...

 

Land-use change to bioenergy production in Europe: implications for the greenhouse gas balance and soil carbon

  
GCB Bioenergy, Vol. 4, No. 4. (July 2012), pp. 372-391, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1757-1707.2011.01116.x

Abstract

Bioenergy from crops is expected to make a considerable contribution to climate change mitigation. However, bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because emissions of CO2, N2O and CH4 during crop production may reduce or completely counterbalance CO2 savings of the substituted fossil fuels. These greenhouse gases (GHGs) need to be included into the carbon footprint calculation of different bioenergy crops under a range of soil conditions and management practices. This review compiles existing knowledge on agronomic and environmental constraints and GHG ...

 

Permafrost carbon−climate feedback is sensitive to deep soil carbon decomposability but not deep soil nitrogen dynamics

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 12. (24 March 2015), pp. 3752-3757, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1415123112

Abstract

[Significance] As the climate warms, the carbon balance of arctic ecosystems will respond in two opposing ways: Plants will grow faster, leading to a carbon sink, while thawing permafrost will lead to decomposition and loss of soil carbon. However, thawing permafrost also releases nitrogen that fertilizes plant growth, offsetting some carbon losses. The balance of these processes determines whether these ecosystems will act as a stabilizing or destabilizing feedback to climate change. We show that this balance is determined by the rate ...

 

Modeling soil carbon transported by water erosion processes

  
Land Degradation & Development, Vol. 11, No. 1. (January 2000), pp. 83-91, https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1099-145x(200001/02)11:1<83::aid-ldr370>3.0.co;2-w

Abstract

Long-term monitoring is needed for direct assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC), soil, and nutrient loss by water erosion on a watershed scale. However, labor and capital requirements preclude implementation of such monitoring at many locations representing principal soils and ecoregions. These considerations warrant the development of diagnostic models to assess erosional SOC loss from more readily obtained data. The same factors affect transport of SOC and mineral soil fraction, suggesting that given the gain or loss of soil minerals, it ...

 

Carbon stocks and soil respiration rates during deforestation, grassland use and subsequent Norway spruce afforestation in the Southern Alps, Italy

  
Tree Physiology, Vol. 20, No. 13. (01 July 2000), pp. 849-857, https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/20.13.849

Abstract

Changes in carbon stocks during deforestation, reforestation and afforestation play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Cultivation of forest lands leads to substantial losses in both biomass and soil carbon, whereas forest regrowth is considered to be a significant carbon sink. We examined below- and aboveground carbon stocks along a chronosequence of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands (0–62 years old) regenerating on abandoned meadows in the Southern Alps. A 130-year-old mixed coniferous Norway spruce–white fir (Abies alba ...

 

Landslide impact on organic carbon cycling in a temperate montane forest

  
Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Vol. 36, No. 12. (30 September 2011), pp. 1670-1679, https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.2191

Abstract

In humid, forested mountain belts, bedrock landslides can harvest organic carbon from above ground biomass and soil (OCmodern) while acting to refresh the landscape surface and turnover forest ecosystems. Here the impact of landslides on organic carbon cycling in 13 river catchments spanning the length of the western Southern Alps, New Zealand is assessed over four decades. Spatial and temporal landslide maps are combined with the observed distribution and measured variability of hillslope OCmodern stocks. On average, it is estimated that ...

 

Forest soils and carbon sequestration

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 220, No. 1-3. (10 December 2005), pp. 242-258, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2005.08.015

Abstract

Soils in equilibrium with a natural forest ecosystem have high carbon (C) density. The ratio of soil:vegetation C density increases with latitude. Land use change, particularly conversion to agricultural ecosystems, depletes the soil C stock. Thus, degraded agricultural soils have lower soil organic carbon (SOC) stock than their potential capacity. Consequently, afforestation of agricultural soils and management of forest plantations can enhance SOC stock through C sequestration. The rate of SOC sequestration, and the magnitude and quality of soil C stock ...

 

Short- and long-term effects of fire on carbon in US dry temperate forest systems

  
BioScience, Vol. 61, No. 2. (February 2011), pp. 139-146, https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2011.61.2.9

Abstract

Forests sequester carbon from the atmosphere, and in so doing can mitigate the effects of climate change. Fire is a natural disturbance process in many forest systems that releases carbon back to the atmosphere. In dry temperate forests, fires historically burned with greater frequency and lower severity than they do today. Frequent fires consumed fuels on the forest floor and maintained open stand structures. Fire suppression has resulted in increased understory fuel loads and tree density; a change in structure that ...

 

Soil erosion and the global carbon budget

  
Environment International, Vol. 29, No. 4. (July 2003), pp. 437-450, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0160-4120(02)00192-7

Abstract

Soil erosion is the most widespread form of soil degradation. Land area globally affected by erosion is 1094 million ha (Mha) by water erosion, of which 751 Mha is severely affected, and 549 Mha by wind erosion, of which 296 Mha is severely affected. Whereas the effects of erosion on productivity and non-point source pollution are widely recognized, those on the C dynamics and attendant emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are not. Despite its global significance, erosion-induced carbon (C) emission into ...

 

Decline in a dominant invertebrate species contributes to altered carbon cycling in a low-diversity soil ecosystem

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 14, No. 8. (August 2008), pp. 1734-1744, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2008.01611.x

Abstract

Low-diversity ecosystems cover large portions of the Earth's land surface, yet studies of climate change on ecosystem functioning typically focus on temperate ecosystems, where diversity is high and the effects of individual species on ecosystem functioning are difficult to determine. We show that a climate-induced decline of an invertebrate species in a low-diversity ecosystem could contribute to significant changes in carbon (C) cycling. Recent climate variability in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica is associated with changes in hydrology, biological productivity, ...

 

Natural regeneration of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) with respect to canopy density, soil moisture and soil carbon content

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 97, No. 2. (October 1997), pp. 95-105, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(97)00091-1

Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to model the regeneration success using quantifiable growth factors. The hypothesis is that the regeneration success can be predicted from a model that incorporates canopy and ground flora leaf area indexes (LAI), soil water content and soil carbon content. In April 1992, 10 plots (1 m2) were established in each of 22 Danish beech stands with natural regeneration originating from the 1989 seed fall. The regeneration success was investigated until autumn 1994. In each ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/soil-carbon

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.