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Selection: with tag scientific-knowledge-sharing [104 articles] 

 

Software simplified

  
Nature, Vol. 546, No. 7656. (29 May 2017), pp. 173-174, https://doi.org/10.1038/546173a

Abstract

Containerization technology takes the hassle out of setting up software and can boost the reproducibility of data-driven research. [Excerpt] [...] Containers are essentially lightweight, configurable virtual machines — simulated versions of an operating system and its hardware, which allow software developers to share their computational environments. Researchers use them to distribute complicated scientific software systems, thereby allowing others to execute the software under the same conditions that its original developers used. In doing so, containers can remove one source of variability in ...

 

Do not publish

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6340. (25 May 2017), pp. 800-801, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aan1362

Abstract

Biologists have long valued publishing detailed information on rare and endangered species. Until relatively recently, much of this information was accessible only through accessing specialized scientific journals in university libraries. However, much of these data have been transferred online with the advent of digital platforms and a rapid push to open-access publication. Information is increasingly also available online in public reports and wildlife atlases, and research published behind paywalls can often be found in the public domain. Increased data and information ...

 

Transdisciplinary global change research: the co-creation of knowledge for sustainability

  
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 5, No. 3-4. (September 2013), pp. 420-431, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2013.07.001

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] A new framework for integrated, transdisciplinary global change research for sustainability is introduced. [::] From a practical perspective three different dimensions of integration (scientific, international and sectoral) are discussed. [::] Co-design of research agendas and co-production of knowledge are discussed as necessary integration approaches to address Future Earth research challenges. [Abstract] The challenges formulated within the Future Earth framework set the orientation for research programmes in sustainability science for the next ten years. Scientific disciplines from natural and social science will collaborate both among ...

 

Communication: science censorship is a global issue

  
Nature, Vol. 542, No. 7640. (08 February 2017), pp. 165-165, https://doi.org/10.1038/542165b

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Regrettably, suppression of public scientific information is already the norm, or is being attempted, in many countries [...]. We fear that such gagging orders could encourage senior bureaucrats to use funding as a tool with which to rein in academic freedoms. [...] The response of scientists to this type of coercion has been to share scientific information widely and openly using such legal means as social media to defend facts and transparency [...] ...

 

A manifesto for reproducible science

  
Nature Human Behaviour, Vol. 1, No. 1. (10 January 2017), 0021, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-016-0021

Abstract

Improving the reliability and efficiency of scientific research will increase the credibility of the published scientific literature and accelerate discovery. Here we argue for the adoption of measures to optimize key elements of the scientific process: methods, reporting and dissemination, reproducibility, evaluation and incentives. There is some evidence from both simulations and empirical studies supporting the likely effectiveness of these measures, but their broad adoption by researchers, institutions, funders and journals will require iterative evaluation and improvement. We discuss the goals ...

 

Position paper for the endorsement of Free Software and Open Standards in Horizon 2020 and all publicly-funded research

  
In Free Software Foundation Europe (January 2017)

Abstract

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is a charity that empowers users to control technology by advocating for Free Software. In a digital world, Free Software is the fundament of Open Knowledge, Open Innovation and Open Science. [\n] Software is an integral part of today’s society. Our daily interactions, transactions, education, communication channels, work and life environments rely heavily on software. "Free Software" refers to all programs distributed under terms and licences that allow users to run the software for any purpose, ...

 

When free software isn't (practically) superior

  
GNU Operating System (2011)

Abstract

[Excerpt] The Open Source Initiative's mission statement reads, “Open source is a development method for software that harnesses the power of distributed peer review and transparency of process. The promise of open source is better quality, higher reliability, more flexibility, lower cost, and an end to predatory vendor lock-in.” [\n] For more than a decade now, the Free Software Foundation has argued against this “open source” characterization of the free software movement. Free software advocates have primarily argued against this framing because ...

 

Running an open experiment: transparency and reproducibility in soil and ecosystem science

  
Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 11, No. 8. (01 August 2016), 084004, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084004

Abstract

Researchers in soil and ecosystem science, and almost every other field, are being pushed—by funders, journals, governments, and their peers—to increase transparency and reproducibility of their work. A key part of this effort is a move towards open data as a way to fight post-publication data loss, improve data and code quality, enable powerful meta- and cross-disciplinary analyses, and increase trust in, and the efficiency of, publicly-funded research. Many scientists however lack experience in, and may be unsure of the benefits ...

 

Five selfish reasons to work reproducibly

  
Genome Biology, Vol. 16, No. 1. (8 December 2015), 274, https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-015-0850-7

Abstract

And so, my fellow scientists: ask not what you can do for reproducibility; ask what reproducibility can do for you! Here, I present five reasons why working reproducibly pays off in the long run and is in the self-interest of every ambitious, career-oriented scientist. [Excerpt] [::Reproducibility: what's in it for me?] In this article, I present five reasons why working reproducibly pays off in the long run and is in the self-interest of every ambitious, career-oriented scientist. [::] Reason number 1: reproducibility helps to avoid ...

 

Copyright contradictions in scholarly publishing

  
First Monday, Vol. 7, No. 11. (04 November 2002), 1006, https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v7i11.1006

Abstract

This paper examines contradictions in how copyright works with the publishing of scholarly journals. These contradictions have to do with the protection of the authors’ interest and have become apparent with the rise of open access publishing as an alternative to the traditional commercial model of selling journal subscriptions. Authors may well be better served, as may the public which supports research, by open access journals because of its wider readership and early indications of greater scholarly impact. This paper reviews ...

 

Social software

  
Nature Methods, Vol. 4, No. 3. (01 March 2007), pp. 189-189, https://doi.org/10.1038/nmeth0307-189

Abstract

Software that is custom-developed as part of novel methods is as important for the method's implementation as reagents and protocols. Such software, or the underlying algorithms, must be made available to readers upon publication. [Excerpt] "An inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build upon the authors' published claims. Therefore, a condition of publication in a Nature journal is that authors are required to make materials, data and associated protocols available to readers promptly on request." ...

 

Why linked data is not enough for scientists

  
Future Generation Computer Systems, Vol. 29, No. 2. (February 2013), pp. 599-611, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.future.2011.08.004

Abstract

[Abstract] Scientific data represents a significant portion of the linked open data cloud and scientists stand to benefit from the data fusion capability this will afford. Publishing linked data into the cloud, however, does not ensure the required reusability. Publishing has requirements of provenance, quality, credit, attribution and methods to provide the reproducibility that enables validation of results. In this paper we make the case for a scientific data publication model on top of linked data and introduce the notion of Research ...

 

Scientists behaving badly

  
Nature, Vol. 435, No. 7043. (9 June 2005), pp. 737-738, https://doi.org/10.1038/435737a

Abstract

To protect the integrity of science, we must look beyond falsification, fabrication and plagiarism, to a wider range of questionable research practices, argue Brian C. Martinson, Melissa S. Anderson and Raymond de Vries. [\n] Serious misbehaviour in research is important for many reasons, not least because it damages the reputation of, and undermines public support for, science. Historically, professionals and the public have focused on headline-grabbing cases of scientific misconduct, but we believe that researchers can no longer afford to ignore ...

 

Why policy needs philosophers as much as it needs science

  
The Guardian, Vol. 2016, No. October, 13. (2016), 57b3q

Abstract

[Excerpt] In a widely-discussed recent essay for the New Atlantis, the policy scholar Daniel Sarewitz argues that science is in deep trouble. While modern research remains wondrously productive, its results are more ambiguous, contestable and dubious than ever before. This problem isn’t caused by a lack of funding or of scientific rigour. Rather, Sarewitz argues that we need to let go of a longstanding and cherished cultural belief – that science consists of uniquely objective knowledge that can put an end to ...

 

ePiX tutorial and reference manual

  
(2008)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] ePiX, a collection of batch utilities, creates mathematically accurate figures, plots, and animations containing LATEX typography. The input syntax is easy to learn, and the user interface resembles that of LATEX itself: You prepare a scene description in a text editor, then “compile” the input file into a picture. LATEX- and web-compatible output types include a LATEX picture-like environment written with PSTricks, tikz, or eepic macros; vector images (eps, ps, and pdf); and bitmapped images and movies (png, mng, and gif). [\n] ePiX’s strengths include: [::] Quality of ...

 

The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship

  
Scientific Data, Vol. 3 (15 March 2016), sdata201618, https://doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.18

Abstract

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders—representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers—have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, ...

 

JRC data policy

  
Vol. 27163 EN (2015), https://doi.org/10.2788/607378

Abstract

[Executive summary] The work on the JRC Data Policy followed the task identified in the JRC Management Plan 2014 to develop a dedicated data policy to complement the JRC Policy on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Supporting Guidance, and to promote open access to research data in the context of Horizon 2020. [\n] Important policy commitments and the relevant regulatory basis within the European Union and the European Commission include: the Commission Decision on the reuse of Commission documents, Commission ...

 

Why scientists must share their research code

  
Nature (13 September 2016), https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2016.20504

Abstract

'Reproducibility editor' Victoria Stodden explains the growing movement to make code and data available to others. [Excerpt] [...] [::What does computational reproducibility mean?] It means that all details of computation — code and data — are made routinely available to others. If I can run your code on your data, then I can understand what you did. We need to expose all the steps that went into any discovery that relies on a computer. [::What’s the scientific value of running the same data with the ...

 

The past, present and future of the PhD thesis

  
Nature, Vol. 535, No. 7610. (6 July 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1038/535007a

Abstract

Writing a PhD thesis is a personal and professional milestone for many researchers. But the process needs to change with the times. [Excerpt] According to one of those often-quoted statistics that should be true but probably isn’t, the average number of people who read a PhD thesis all the way through is 1.6. And that includes the author. More interesting might be the average number of PhD theses that the typical scientist — and reader of Nature — has read from start ...

 

Disciplinary action

  
Nature, Vol. 495, No. 7442. (27 March 2013), pp. 409-410, https://doi.org/10.1038/495409b

Abstract

How scientists share and reuse information is driven by technology but shaped by discipline. [Excerpt] [\n] [...] The transformation of research publishing is less a revolution and more a war of attrition. Battle lines were drawn long ago and all sides are well dug-in. In 2001, this journal published a series of viewpoints on the future of ‘e-access to the primary literature’ (see go.nature.com/pezj84). Those attitudes seem strikingly familiar today. At the time, the founders of the Public Library of Science initiative (then PLS, ...

 

1,500 scientists lift the lid on reproducibility

  
Nature, Vol. 533, No. 7604. (25 May 2016), pp. 452-454, https://doi.org/10.1038/533452a

Abstract

Survey sheds light on the ‘crisis’ rocking research. [Excerpt] More than 70% of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist's experiments, and more than half have failed to reproduce their own experiments. Those are some of the telling figures that emerged from Nature's survey of 1,576 researchers who took a brief online questionnaire on reproducibility in research. [\n] The data reveal sometimes-contradictory attitudes towards reproducibility. Although 52% of those surveyed agree that there is a significant 'crisis' of reproducibility, less than ...

 

Cross-domain metadata interoperability: lessons learnt in INSPIRE

  
In Proceedings of the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2013 (2013)

Abstract

Since 2007, EU Member States have been involved in creating an infrastructure for spatial information in Europe (INSPIRE), based on a legal and technical interoperability framework. This paper presents some of the lessons learnt during the implementation of this infrastructure (which started in 2009) and during work on data and service interoperability coordinated with European and international initiatives. We describe a number of critical interoperability issues affecting both scientific and government data and metadata, and propose how these problems could be ...

 

Reality check on reproducibility

  
Nature, Vol. 533, No. 7604. (25 May 2016), pp. 437-437, https://doi.org/10.1038/533437a

Abstract

A survey of Nature readers revealed a high level of concern about the problem of irreproducible results. Researchers, funders and journals need to work together to make research more reliable. [Excerpt] Is there a reproducibility crisis in science? Yes, according to the readers of Nature. Two-thirds of researchers who responded to a survey by this journal said that current levels of reproducibility are a major problem. [\n] [...] [\n] What does ‘reproducibility’ mean? Those who study the science of science joke that the definition ...

 

Badges to acknowledge open practices: a simple, low-cost, effective method for increasing transparency

  
PLoS Biology, Vol. 14, No. 5. (12 May 2016), e1002456, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002456

Abstract

Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among ...

 

Updated source code for calculating fire danger indices in the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System

  
Vol. NOR-X-424 (2015)

Abstract

This report presents updated versions of the FORTRAN 77 program originally published by the Canadian Forest Service in 1985 and used to calculate the Canadian forest fire weather indices from daily weather observations. The updated program is presented here in FORTRAN 95, C, C++, Python, Java and SAS/IML programming languages to meet the needs of various users. The updated versions are easier to understand and use than the original source code. The updated source codes were written in a modular programming style, consisting of a main program and ...

References

  1. Canadian Forestry Service. 1984. Tables for the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System. (4th ed.) Environ. Can., Can. For. Serv., Ottawa, ON. For. Tech. Rep. 25. Also available at http://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/pubwarehouse/pdfs/31168.pdf .
  2. Chapman, S. J. 2004. FORTRAN 90/95 for scientists and engineers. McGraw Hill Higher Education, Toronto, ON. Also available at http://www.mhhe.com/engcs/general/chapman/index.mhtml .
  3. De Groot, W.J.; Field, R.D.; Brady, M.A.; Roswintiarti, O.; Mohamad, M. 2006. Development of the
 

On the cutting edge: teaching help for geoscience faculty

  
Science, Vol. 327, No. 5969. (25 February 2010), pp. 1095-1096, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183028

Abstract

In contrast to science, which makes progress at the level of the community and where individual work builds on all that has come before, teaching science has often been an individual enterprise. Typically, faculty create courses in isolation, without the benefit of knowledge of others' classroom experiences or research on how students learn (1, 2). Building a culture of sharing and communal improvement in support of undergraduate geoscience teaching is the goal of the On the Cutting Edge professional development program. ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 32

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   science-history   science-literacy   science-policy-interface   science-society-interface   scientific-communication   scientific-community-self-correction   scientific-creativity   scientific-knowledge-sharing   scientific-misconduct   scientific-software   scientific-topics-focus   scilab   scipy   scirrhia-pini   sclerophyllous   scolytus   scolytus-intricatus   scolytus-spp   scopus   scopus-indexed   scotland   scottnema-lindsayae   scrub   scrubland   sdm   sea   sea-level   secondary-metabolism   secondary-opportunistic-pest   secondary-production   sediment   sediment-flushing   sediment-retention   sediment-sluicing   sediment-transport   sediment-yield   seed-dispersal   seed-limitation   seed-orchard   seed-predation   seed-production   seed-sterility   seedling-production   seedling-recruitment   seedlings   seeds   seiridium-cardinale   seiridium-spp   seismicity   self-adaptive-systems   self-fertile   self-healing   self-organization   self-similarity   self-stabilisation   sell   semantic-array-programming   semantic-constraints   semantic-web   semantically-enhanced-library-languages   semantics   semi-natural-habitat   senecio-spp   senegal   sensitivity   separation-of-concerns   septoria-musiva   sequoia-abietina   sequoia-sempervirens   sequoiadendron-giganteum   serbia   serbian-spruce   serendipity   serotinous-pine   service-as-a-software-substitute   service-tree   sesia-apiformis   sex-ratio   shade-tolerance   shake   shallow-soil   shape-index   shape-semantics   sharka-disease   short-rotation-forestry   shrub   shrubs   si   sicily   sieve   sieve-parameter-training-architecture   sigma-pi-networks   silent-faults   silo-thinking   silver-bullet   silver-fir   silver-fir-decline   silvical-characteristics   silvics  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Brain and Behavior: we want you to share your data

  
Brain and Behavior, Vol. 4, No. 1. (January 2014), pp. 1-3, https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.192

Abstract

We at Brain and Behavior are happy, for one, that data sharing is now here. [Excerpt] [...] Many reasons are given as to why we cannot, do not, or should not make data available (e.g., Strasser 2013; Wallis et al. 2013), but I think that the main reason we do not routinely share data is that, until recently, we could not. And because we could not, a system of scholarly communication grew where data were disposable. Literally. Eventually, the boxes piled upon ...

 

Changes in data sharing and data reuse practices and perceptions among scientists worldwide

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 8. (26 August 2015), e0134826, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0134826

Abstract

The incorporation of data sharing into the research lifecycle is an important part of modern scholarly debate. In this study, the DataONE Usability and Assessment working group addresses two primary goals: To examine the current state of data sharing and reuse perceptions and practices among research scientists as they compare to the 2009/2010 baseline study, and to examine differences in practices and perceptions across age groups, geographic regions, and subject disciplines. We distributed surveys to a multinational sample of scientific researchers ...

 

Commission Notice - Guidelines on recommended standard licences, datasets and charging for the reuse of documents 2014/C 240/01

  
Official Journal of the European Union, Vol. 57, No. C 240. (24 July 2014), pp. 1-10

Abstract

[Excerpt] [:1. Purpose of the notice] Opening up public sector information (PSI) for re-use brings major socioeconomic benefits. Data generated by the public sector can be used as raw material for innovative value-added services and products which boost the economy by creating new jobs and encouraging investment in data-driven sectors. They also play a role in increasing government accountability and transparency. These benefits have recently been recognised by the G8 leaders and enshrined in an Open Data Charter (1). [\n] Yet, studies conducted on ...

 

Commission Decision of 12 December 2011 on the reuse of Commission documents (2011/833/EU)

  
Official Journal of the European Union, Vol. 54, No. L 330. (12 December 2011), pp. 39-42

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] [:Article 1] [::Subject matter] This Decision determines the conditions for the reuse of documents held by the Commission or on its behalf by the Publications Office of the European Union (the Publications Office) with the aim of facilitating a wider reuse of information, enhancing the image of openness of the Commission, and avoiding unnecessary administrative burdens for reusers and the Commission services alike. [:Article 2] [::Scope] [::1] This Decision applies to public documents produced by the Commission or by public and private entities ...

 

Expert group and workshop on valuation of forest ecosystem services

  
(2015)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Foreword] Forests create multiple benefits for the society, providing renewable raw materials and play an important role in human wellbeing, biological diversity, the global carbon cycle, water balance, erosion control, combating desertification and the prevention of natural hazards, among others. Forests contribute to environmental stability, economic prosperity and offer social, ecosystem and recreational services. [\n] They improve the knowledge about ecosystem services, its value and natural capital allow us to see the direct ways in which we depend on the natural environment and how local policy makers can address policy challenges in many ...

 

Integrating local and scientific knowledge for environmental management

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 91, No. 8. (22 August 2010), pp. 1766-1777, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2010.03.023

Abstract

This paper evaluates the processes and mechanisms available for integrating different types of knowledge for environmental management. Following a review of the challenges associated with knowledge integration, we present a series of questions for identifying, engaging, evaluating and applying different knowledges during project design and delivery. These questions are used as a basis to compare three environmental management projects that aimed to integrate knowledge from different sources in the United Kingdom, Solomon Islands and Australia. Comparative results indicate that integrating different ...

Visual summary

 

The case for open preprints in biology

  
PLoS Biology, Vol. 11, No. 5. (14 May 2013), e1001563, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001563

Abstract

Biologists should submit their preprints to open servers, a practice common in mathematics and physics, to open and accelerate the scientific process. [Excerpt: Introduction] Public preprint servers allow authors to make manuscripts publicly available before, or in parallel to, submitting them to journals for traditional peer review. The rationale for preprint servers is fundamentally simple: to make the results of research available to the scientific community as soon as possible, instead of waiting until the peer-review process is fully completed. Sharing manuscripts using ...

 

Funders must encourage scientists to share

  
Nature, Vol. 522, No. 7555. (11 June 2015), pp. 129-129, https://doi.org/10.1038/522129a

Abstract

To realize the full potential of large data sets, researchers must agree on better ways to pass data around, says Martin Bobrow. [Excerpt] How can we make best use of the vast amounts of data on genomics, epidemiology and population-level health being collected by researchers? Maximizing the benefits depends on how well we as a scientific community share information. [...] [\n] Both those who generate data and those who want to use them expressed frustration at the way that data-access processes are ...

 

The open access advantage considering citation, article usage and social media attention

  
Scientometrics, Vol. 103, No. 2. (2015), pp. 555-564, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-015-1547-0

Abstract

In this study, we compare the difference in the impact between open access (OA) and non-open access (non-OA) articles. 1761 Nature Communications articles published from 1 January 2012 to 31 August 2013 are selected as our research objects, including 587 OA articles and 1174 non-OA articles. Citation data and daily updated article-level metrics data are harvested directly from the platform of nature.com. Data is analyzed from the static versus temporal-dynamic perspectives. The OA citation advantage is confirmed, and the OA advantage ...

 

Data reuse and the open data citation advantage

  
PeerJ, Vol. 1 (01 October 2013), e175, https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.175

Abstract

[Background] Attribution to the original contributor upon reuse of published data is important both as a reward for data creators and to document the provenance of research findings. Previous studies have found that papers with publicly available datasets receive a higher number of citations than similar studies without available data. However, few previous analyses have had the statistical power to control for the many variables known to predict citation rate, which has led to uncertain estimates of the “citation benefit”. Furthermore, ...

 

Nine simple ways to make it easier to (re)use your data

  
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 6, No. 2. (2013), https://doi.org/10.4033/iee.2013.6b.6.f

Abstract

Sharing data is increasingly considered to be an important part of the scientific process. Making your data publicly available allows original results to be reproduced and new analyses to be conducted. While sharing your data is the first step in allowing reuse, it is also important that the data be easy to understand and use. We describe nine simple ways to make it easy to reuse the data that you share and also make it easier to work with it yourself. ...

 

Reproducible research can still be wrong: adopting a prevention approach

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 6. (11 February 2015), pp. 1645-1646, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1421412111

Abstract

[Excerpt] Reproducibility—the ability to recompute results—and replicability—the chances other experimenters will achieve a consistent result—are two foundational characteristics of successful scientific research. Consistent findings from independent investigators are the primary means by which scientific evidence accumulates for or against a hypothesis. Yet, of late, there has been a crisis of confidence among researchers worried about the rate at which studies are either reproducible or replicable. To maintain the integrity of science research and the public’s trust in science, the scientific community ...

Visual summary

 

A survey of data provenance techniques

  
No. IUB-CS-TR618. (September 2005)

Abstract

Data management is growing in complexity as large-scale applications take advantage of the loosely coupled resources brought together by grid middleware and by abundant storage capacity. Metadata describing the data products used in and generated by these applications is essential to disambiguate the data and enable reuse. Data provenance, one kind of metadata, pertains to the derivation history of a data product starting from its original sources. The provenance of data products generated by complex transformations such as workflows is of considerable value to scientists. From it, ...

 

A survey of data provenance in e-science

  
SIGMOD Rec., Vol. 34, No. 3. (September 2005), pp. 31-36, https://doi.org/10.1145/1084805.1084812

Abstract

Data management is growing in complexity as large-scale applications take advantage of the loosely coupled resources brought together by grid middleware and by abundant storage capacity. Metadata describing the data products used in and generated by these applications is essential to disambiguate the data and enable reuse. Data provenance, one kind of metadata, pertains to the derivation history of a data product starting from its original sources.In this paper we create a taxonomy of data provenance characteristics and apply it to ...

 

Data archiving

  
The American Naturalist, Vol. 175, No. 2. (February 2010), pp. 145-146, https://doi.org/10.1086/650340

Abstract

[Excerpt] Science depends on good data. Data are central to our understanding of the natural world, yet most data in ecology and evolution are lost to science—except perhaps in summary form—very quickly after they are collected. Once the results of a study are published, the data on which those results are based are often stored unreliably, subject to loss by hard drive failure and (even more likely) by the researcher forgetting the specific details required to use the data (Michener et ...

 

Data, eternal

  
Science, Vol. 347, No. 6217. (02 January 2015), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaa5057

Abstract

[Excerpt] During 2014, Science worked with members of the research community, other publishers, and representatives of funding agencies on many initiatives to increase transparency and promote reproducibility in the published research literature. Those efforts will continue in 2015. Connected to that progress, and an essential element to its success, an additional focus will be on making data more open, easier to access, more discoverable, and more thoroughly documented. My own commitment to these goals is deeply held, for I learned early in ...

 

Nature makes all articles free to view

  

Abstract

Publisher permits subscribers and media to share read-only versions of its papers. [Excerpt] All research papers from Nature will be made free to read in a proprietary screen-view format that can be annotated but not copied, printed or downloaded, the journal’s publisher Macmillan announced on 2 December. The content-sharing policy, which also applies to 48 other journals in Macmillan’s Nature Publishing Group (NPG) division, including Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine and Nature Physics, marks an attempt to let scientists freely read and share ...

 

Facilitating reproducibility in scientific computing: principles and practice

  
In Reproducibility: Principles, Problems, Practices (2015)

Abstract

The foundation of scientific research is theory and experiment, carefully documented in open publications, in part so that other researchers can reproduce and validate the claimed findings. Unfortunately, the field of scientific and mathematical computing has evolved in ways that often do not meet these high standards. In published computational work, frequently there is no record of the work ow process that produced the published computational results, and in some cases, even the code is missing or has been changed significantly ...

References

  1. Linpack. Available at http://www.netlib.org/linpack
  2. NIST digital library of mathematical functions. Available at http://dlmf.nist.gov
  3. Heartbleed. 2014. Available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heartbleed
  4. Top500 list. July 2014. Available at http://top500.org/statistics/perfdevel
  5. A. Abad, R. Barrio, and A. Dena. Computing periodic orbits with arbitrary precision. Phys. Rev. E, 84:016701, 2011
  6. D. H. Bailey. Misleading performance reporting in the supercomputing field. Scientific
 

Code share

  
Nature, Vol. 514, No. 7524. (29 October 2014), pp. 536-536, https://doi.org/10.1038/514536a

Abstract

Papers in Nature journals should make computer code accessible where possible. [Excerpt] A theme in Nature’s ongoing campaign for the replicability and reproducibility of our research papers is that key components of publications should be available to peers who wish to validate the techniques and results. A core element of many papers is the computercode used by authors in models, simulations and data analysis. In an ideal world, this code would always be transportable and easily used by others. In such a ...

 

EPPO Global Database

  
(2015)
by EPPO

Abstract

EPPO Global Database is maintained by the Secretariat of the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO). This database is still under development but its ultimate goal is to include all pest-specific information that has been produced by EPPO. ...

 

Designing and building real environmental decision support systems

  
Environmental Modelling & Software, Vol. 19, No. 9. (September 2004), pp. 857-873, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2003.03.007

Abstract

The complexity of environmental problems makes necessary the development and application of new tools capable of processing not only numerical aspects, but also experience from experts and wide public participation, which are all needed in decision-making processes. Environmental decision support systems (EDSSs) are among the most promising approaches to confront this complexity. The fact that different tools (artificial intelligence techniques, statistical/numerical methods, geographical information systems, and environmental ontologies) can be integrated under different architectures confers EDSSs the ability to confront complex ...

 

Give, and it will be given to you

  

Abstract

[Excerpt] In 2007, quantitative ecologist Karthik Ram sought to find out why certain insect parasites appeared in some sand dunes but not others. Ram, who was a graduate student at the time, thought that asking scientists for field data used in the papers they published was no big deal. But the scientists he e-mailed ignored his requests, so Ram, then at the University of California (UC), Davis, had to collect extra insect samples. Later, as he studied how climate change was impacting ...

 

Online collaboration: scientists and the social network

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7513. (13 August 2014), pp. 126-129, https://doi.org/10.1038/512126a

Abstract

Giant academic social networks have taken off to a degree that no one expected even a few years ago. A Nature survey explores why. ...

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
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