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Selection: with tag scientific-creativity [27 articles] 

 

Reviewers are blinkered by bibliometrics

  
Nature, Vol. 544, No. 7651. (26 April 2017), pp. 411-412, https://doi.org/10.1038/544411a

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Although journal impact factors (JIFs) were developed to assess journals and say little about any individual paper, reviewers routinely justify their evaluations on the basis of where candidates have published. [...] As economists who study science and innovation, we see engrained processes working against cherished goals. Scientists we interview routinely say that they dare not propose bold projects for funding in part because of expectations that they will produce a steady stream of papers in journals with high impact ...

 

Opinion: on being an advisor to today’s junior scientists

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 21. (23 May 2017), pp. 5321-5323, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1704511114

Abstract

[Excerpt] Young scientists often have the same long-term goal: use one’s smarts and drive to gain insights into a problem of interest. Typically, these scientists draw upon a long-standing and time-tested scientific process: formulate a hypothesis, design experiments to test this hypothesis, collect data, interpret the data, revisit and modify the hypothesis, and so on. [\n] Unfortunately, the reality isn’t quite so straightforward. The hours are long and the rewards short. And the challenges for fledgling scientists seem to be growing. Attractive ...

 

Outreach: local problems are a low research priority

  
Nature, Vol. 544, No. 7648. (05 April 2017), pp. 35-35, https://doi.org/10.1038/544035e

Abstract

[Excerpt] You ask what science can do [...] suggesting that it would be useful to work with local communities on research problems that could improve [...] quality of life (Nature 542, 391; 2017). I disagree. [...] Universities are global institutions that have the primary objectives of creating knowledge and educating people to continue the development of our societies. Building stronger links with local society and solving local problems should never be a priority for any university. ...

 

Attempts to manufacture scientific discovery

  
Nature, Vol. 94, No. 2358. (7 January 1915), pp. 512-512, https://doi.org/10.1038/094512a0

Abstract

[Excerpt] In an excellent article forming one of his admirable series of essays entitled “Science from an Easy-chair,” published in the Daily Telegraph of December 15, 1914, Sir Ray Lankester deals particularly with the case of the recent proposal that the Lister Institute should be handed over to the Medical Research Committee of the National Insurance Commission. The proposal was rejected on November 18 by the votes of the members; and Sir Ray Lankester preaches a useful sermon upon this text. ...

 

Corporate culture: protect idea factories

  
Nature, Vol. 543, No. 7646. (22 March 2017), pp. 491-491, https://doi.org/10.1038/543491a

Abstract

[Excerpt] It is unsurprising that universities have adopted corporate culture (Nature 540, 315; 10.1038/540315a2016), but surprising that they select such archaic models. Universities corporatize because they must raise funds through teaching, research and commercialization. [...] Universities are the only social institutions set up specifically to produce ideas, and this is their most valuable societal role. [...] Many universities have copied the manufacturing models of the 1950s. Power has shifted from academics to administrators. Academics are treated as interchangeable and replaceable, and performance ...

 

Data-driven predictions in the science of science

  
Science, Vol. 355, No. 6324. (03 February 2017), pp. 477-480, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aal4217

Abstract

The desire to predict discoveries—to have some idea, in advance, of what will be discovered, by whom, when, and where—pervades nearly all aspects of modern science, from individual scientists to publishers, from funding agencies to hiring committees. In this Essay, we survey the emerging and interdisciplinary field of the “science of science” and what it teaches us about the predictability of scientific discovery. We then discuss future opportunities for improving predictions derived from the science of science and its potential impact, ...

 

The mismeasurement of science

  
Current Biology, Vol. 17, No. 15. (07 August 2007), pp. R583-R585, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2007.06.014

Abstract

[Excerpt:Impact factors and citations] Crucially, impact factors are distorted by positive feedback — many citations are not based on reading the paper but by reading other papers, particularly reviews. One study even suggested that, of cited articles, only some 20% had actually been read. [...] Nevertheless, citations are now being used to make quantitative comparisons between scientists. [...] [Changes in behaviour] Unfortunately, the use of these measures is having damaging effects on perceptions and on behaviour; these I list below. Please note that ...

 

Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 11. (15 March 2016), pp. 2982-2987, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1518798113

Abstract

[Significance] The remarkable ecological success of the human species has been attributed to our capacity to overcome environmental challenges through the development of complex technologies. Complex technologies are typically beyond the inventive capacities of individuals and result from a population process by which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population’s ability to develop technologies is positively affected by its size and connectedness. Here, we present an experiment demonstrating that partially connected groups ...

 

Opinion: science in the age of selfies

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 34. (23 August 2016), pp. 9384-9387, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1609793113

Abstract

[Excerpt] [\n] [...] [\n] Here there is a paradox: Today, there are many more scientists, and much more money is spent on research, yet the pace of fundamental innovation, the kinds of theories and engineering practices that will feed the pipeline of future progress, appears, to some observers, including us, to be slowing [...]. Why might that be the case? [\n] One argument is that “theoretical models” may not even exist for some branches of science, at least not in the ...

 

Three lessons rarely taught

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6291. (June 2016), pp. 1358-1358, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.352.6291.1358

Abstract

[Excerpt] After earning two advanced degrees, completing three postdocs, working in three countries, and finally reaching the stage when I am setting up my own lab, I realize that three lessons taught by three great mentors have influenced how I think about doing science. These lessons, each of which came at just the right time in my career, have helped me probe new intellectual territories and enjoy my work. [\n] [...] [::Play around] The first lesson came from my Ph.D. supervisor in my ...

 

Arguing to learn in science: the role of collaborative, critical discourse

  
Science, Vol. 328, No. 5977. (22 April 2010), pp. 463-466, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183944

Abstract

Argument and debate are common in science, yet they are virtually absent from science education. Recent research shows, however, that opportunities for students to engage in collaborative discourse and argumentation offer a means of enhancing student conceptual understanding and students' skills and capabilities with scientific reasoning. As one of the hallmarks of the scientist is critical, rational skepticism, the lack of opportunities to develop the ability to reason and argue scientifically would appear to be a significant weakness in contemporary educational ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 32

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   science-history   science-literacy   science-policy-interface   science-society-interface   scientific-communication   scientific-community-self-correction   scientific-creativity   scientific-knowledge-sharing   scientific-misconduct   scientific-software   scientific-topics-focus   scilab   scipy   scirrhia-pini   sclerophyllous   scolytus   scolytus-intricatus   scolytus-spp   scopus   scopus-indexed   scotland   scottnema-lindsayae   scrub   scrubland   sdm   sea   sea-level   secondary-metabolism   secondary-opportunistic-pest   secondary-production   sediment   sediment-flushing   sediment-retention   sediment-sluicing   sediment-transport   sediment-yield   seed-dispersal   seed-limitation   seed-orchard   seed-predation   seed-production   seed-sterility   seedling-production   seedling-recruitment   seedlings   seeds   seiridium-cardinale   seiridium-spp   seismicity   self-adaptive-systems   self-fertile   self-healing   self-organization   self-similarity   self-stabilisation   sell   semantic-array-programming   semantic-constraints   semantic-web   semantically-enhanced-library-languages   semantics   semi-natural-habitat   senecio-spp   senegal   sensitivity   separation-of-concerns   septoria-musiva   sequoia-abietina   sequoia-sempervirens   sequoiadendron-giganteum   serbia   serbian-spruce   serendipity   serotinous-pine   service-as-a-software-substitute   service-tree   sesia-apiformis   sex-ratio   shade-tolerance   shake   shallow-soil   shape-index   shape-semantics   sharka-disease   short-rotation-forestry   shrub   shrubs   si   sicily   sieve   sieve-parameter-training-architecture   sigma-pi-networks   silent-faults   silo-thinking   silver-bullet   silver-fir   silver-fir-decline   silvical-characteristics   silvics  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Orchestrating a powerful group

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6283. (14 April 2016), pp. 378-378, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.352.6283.378

Abstract

[Excerpt] As I entered my assistant professor years in the early 1990s and worked to assemble my research team, I considered each candidate individually. I took on students based on grades and test scores, and my relationships with them were one-on-one. I didn't consider their teamwork abilities or soft skills—or the group dynamic as a whole. [...] [\n] [...] I now think of each group member as a critical puzzle piece for my collective. I assemble teams of individuals with different but complementary ...

 

The measure of research merit

  
Science, Vol. 346, No. 6214. (05 December 2014), pp. 1155-1155, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaa3796

Abstract

Each year, \$1.4 trillion are invested in research by governments, foundations, and corporations. Hundreds if not thousands of high-profile prizes and medals are awarded to the best researchers, boosting their careers. Therefore, establishing a reliable predictor of future performance is a trillion-dollar matter. Last month, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation convened an international assembly of leaders in academia, research management, and policy to discuss “Beyond Bibliometrics: Identifying the Best.” Current assessment is largely based on counting publications, counting citations, taking note ...

 

Solutions of Maxwell’s Equations in Free Space

  
Vol. 2 (1964)
 

States of curiosity modulate hippocampus-dependent learning via the dopaminergic circuit

  
Neuron, Vol. 84, No. 2. (24 October 2014), pp. 486-496, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.08.060

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] People are better at learning information that they are curious about [::] Memory for incidental material presented during curious states was also enhanced [::] Curiosity associated with anticipatory activity in nucleus accumbens and midbrain [::] Memory benefits for incidental material depend on midbrain-hippocampus involvement [Summary] People find it easier to learn about topics that interest them, but little is known about the mechanisms by which intrinsic motivational states affect learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how curiosity (intrinsic motivation to ...

 

A swan in the making

  
Science, Vol. 345, No. 6199. (22 August 2014), pp. 855-855, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1259740

Abstract

Reproducibility is the ugly duckling of science. It provokes distress, denial, and passionate calls for action. With $1.5 trillion spent globally each year on R&D,* the idea that 80% of it is irreproducible† can cause downright dread. It threatens the foundations and credibility of the scientific enterprise. But look past the surface, and reproducibility may well be a swan in the making. ...

 

Scientific Computing's Productivity Gridlock: How Software Engineering Can Help

  
Computing in Science & Engineering, Vol. 11, No. 6. (01 November 2009), pp. 30-39, https://doi.org/10.1109/mcse.2009.205

Abstract

Hardware improvements do little to improve real productivity in scientific programming. Indeed, the dominant barriers to productivity improvement are now in the software processes. To break the gridlock, we must establish a degree of cooperation and collaboration with the software engineering community that does not yet exist. The accumulated technologies and practices of general computer science and software engineering have failed to impact scientific programming's productivity gridlock. To address this productivity crisis, the computer science and software engineering communities must better ...

 

The forgotten half of scientific thinking.

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 111, No. 17. (29 April 2014), pp. 6119-6119, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1404649111

Abstract

[Excerpt] Although thinking is the core business of scientists, we rarely ponder how it thrives best; this is ironic, as there is abundant scientific insight to draw upon. For example, it is now known that thinking has two complementary modes: roughly, association versus reasoning (1). We systematically underestimate the role of the first (1), and the way our institutions, meetings, and teaching are organized heavily reflects this imbalance. By contrast, many of the greatest scientists systematically nurtured a balanced dual-thinking process. ...

 

What goes around comes around: knowledge hiding, perceived motivational climate, and creativity

  
Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 57, No. 1. (01 February 2014), pp. 172-192, https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2012.0122

Abstract

Knowledge hiding prevents colleagues from generating creative ideas, but it may also have negative consequences for the creativity of a knowledge hider. Drawing on social exchange theory, we propose that when employees hide knowledge, they trigger a reciprocal distrust loop in which coworkers are unwilling to share knowledge with them. We further suggest that these effects are contingent on motivational climate, in such a way that the negative effects of an individual's hiding knowledge on his/her own creativity are enhanced in ...

 

Promoting transparency in social science research

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6166. (03 January 2014), pp. 30-31, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1245317

Abstract

There is growing appreciation for the advantages of experimentation in the social sciences. Policy-relevant claims that in the past were backed by theoretical arguments and inconclusive correlations are now being investigated using more credible methods. Changes have been particularly pronounced in development economics, where hundreds of randomized trials have been carried out over the last decade. When experimentation is difficult or impossible, researchers are using quasi-experimental designs. Governments and advocacy groups display a growing appetite for evidence-based policy-making. In 2005, Mexico ...

 

Interdisciplinary research: a philosophy, art form, artifact or antidote?

  
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science In Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, Vol. 35, No. 1. (2000), pp. 58-66, https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02911166

Abstract

Interdisciplinary research has many faces—a philosophy, an art form, an artifact, and an antidote. It is all of these things because interdisciplinary research attempts to ask questions in ways that cut across disciplinary boundaries. This is not politically correct and universities especially find it difficult to manage interdisciplinarians and their projects. The author argues that interdisciplinary research has persisted as an alternative when traditional research approaches have failed to come up with answers to common problems. Interdisciplinary research will continue to ...

 

Exploring scientists' working timetable: Do scientists often work overtime?

  
Journal of Informetrics, Vol. 6, No. 4. (13 Aug 2012), pp. 655-660, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2012.07.003

Abstract

A novel method is proposed to monitor and record scientists' working timetable. We record the downloads information of scientific papers real-timely from Springer round the clock, and try to explore scientists' working habits. As our observation demonstrates, many scientists are still engaged in their research after working hours every day. Many of them work far into the night, even till next morning. In addition, research work also intrudes into their weekends. Different working time patterns are revealed. In the US, overnight work is more prevalent among scientists, while ...

 

Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909–2012)

  
Nature, Vol. 493, No. 7432. (9 January 2013), pp. 306-306, https://doi.org/10.1038/493306a

Abstract

Nobel prizewinning neurobiologist and eminent advocate for science. ...

 

The importance of stupidity in scientific research

  
Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 121, No. 11. (01 June 2008), pp. 1771-1771, https://doi.org/10.1242/jcs.033340

Abstract

[Excerpt] The crucial lesson was that the scope of things I didn't know wasn't merely vast; it was, for all practical purposes, infinite. That realization, instead of being discouraging, was liberating. If our ignorance is infinite, the only possible course of action is to muddle through as best we can. I'd like to suggest that our Ph.D. programs often do students a disservice in two ways. First, I don't think students are made to understand how hard it is to do ...

 

Increasing the frame: interdisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity and representativity

  
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol. 32, No. 3. (September 2007), pp. 203-212, https://doi.org/10.1179/030801807x211702

Abstract

Why do scientists have to work within a frame? How do they increase their frame, and what are the challenges of doing so? These are the questions I wish to address in this paper. I will argue that framing is a necessary but problematic practice for anyone engaged in producing and communicating knowledge. Scientists have to frame the world in order to produce – at least temporarily – an enclosed space containing stable objects of interest. Yet there are now many ...

 

University research funding and publication performance—An international comparison

  
Research Policy, Vol. 39, No. 6. (20 July 2010), pp. 822-834, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2010.03.003

Abstract

In current science policies, competition and output incentives are emphasized as a means of making university systems efficient and productive. By comparing eight countries, this article analyzes how funding environments of university research vary across countries and whether more competitive funding systems are more efficient in producing scientific publications. The article shows that there are significant differences in the competitiveness of funding systems, but no straightforward connection between financial incentives and the efficiency of university systems exists. Our results provoke questions ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/scientific-creativity

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.