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Selection: with tag research-management [109 articles] 

 

Research on a razor's edge

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6342. (09 June 2017), pp. 1094-1094, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.356.6342.1094

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Scientists in the United States face a shortage of tenure-track faculty jobs and fierce competition for a shrinking pool of grants. These dimming prospects reflect decades of underinvestment in the sciences. The current administration threatens to make things worse. We are all doing research on a razor's edge. [\n] It's no surprise that American scientists are becoming increasingly curious about opportunities elsewhere in the world. U.S. spending on research and development still ranks among the highest, but those who are ...

 

Software simplified

  
Nature, Vol. 546, No. 7656. (29 May 2017), pp. 173-174, https://doi.org/10.1038/546173a

Abstract

Containerization technology takes the hassle out of setting up software and can boost the reproducibility of data-driven research. [Excerpt] [...] Containers are essentially lightweight, configurable virtual machines — simulated versions of an operating system and its hardware, which allow software developers to share their computational environments. Researchers use them to distribute complicated scientific software systems, thereby allowing others to execute the software under the same conditions that its original developers used. In doing so, containers can remove one source of variability in ...

 

Stressing mental health

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6340. (25 May 2017), pp. 878-878, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.356.6340.878

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Stress is an ingrained and unavoidable aspect of scientific practice. In some unfortunate cases, lab culture can make it worse. In many others, however, it is simply the nature of research. Deadlines, tight funding, and the pressure to “publish or perish” all create chronic stress. There is no avoiding these issues. [...] Personally, I realized that self-imposed deadlines and goals created much of the stress I was feeling, and that tempering my expectations was an easy way to reduce ...

 

Opinion: on being an advisor to today’s junior scientists

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 21. (23 May 2017), pp. 5321-5323, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1704511114

Abstract

[Excerpt] Young scientists often have the same long-term goal: use one’s smarts and drive to gain insights into a problem of interest. Typically, these scientists draw upon a long-standing and time-tested scientific process: formulate a hypothesis, design experiments to test this hypothesis, collect data, interpret the data, revisit and modify the hypothesis, and so on. [\n] Unfortunately, the reality isn’t quite so straightforward. The hours are long and the rewards short. And the challenges for fledgling scientists seem to be growing. Attractive ...

 

Countering European brain drain

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6339. (19 May 2017), pp. 695-696, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aan3920

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Mobile European researchers who went to the United States were significantly more likely to report strong positive career effects than their mobile peers who moved within the European Union (EU) (up to twice as high) [...] In search of a possible “elite” brain drain from Europe, we examined return rates for a sample of Europeans pursuing Ph.D. degrees in economics in the United States (3). Those better students who received Ph.D. degrees from top U.S. institutes are more likely ...

 

Academia’s never-ending selection for productivity

  
Scientometrics In Scientometrics, Vol. 103, No. 1. (15 February 2015), pp. 333-336, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-015-1534-5

Abstract

[Excerpt] Over the last decade, a debate has been emerging on “Academia’s obsession with quantity” (Lawrence 2007; Fischer et al. 2012a) and the subsequent Impact Factor Race, an unhealthy game played by scientists (Cherubini 2008; Brischoux and Cook 2009). Despite being widely despised by the scientific community (but see Loyola et al. 2012), the “publish or perish” dogma and the use of productivity indices (e.g., journal’s impact factor, number of published articles) to assess a researcher’s output seem to hold on, ...

 

Impact factors: no totum pro parte by skewness of citation

  
Cardiovascular Research, Vol. 61, No. 2. (01 February 2004), pp. 201-203, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cardiores.2003.11.023

Abstract

Citation of the various papers published in one and the same journal is highly skewed. Journals with a high impact factor obtain this high value by frequent citation of only a limited number of their papers and, on the other hand, journals with low impact factors publish many papers that remain uncited [1]. Thus, mere publication of a paper in a given journal cannot be regarded as a quality marker of that particular paper [2], it just means that the authors ...

 

Exploring transdisciplinary integration within a large research program: empirical lessons from four thematic synthesis processes

  
Research Policy, Vol. 46, No. 3. (April 2017), pp. 678-692, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2017.01.004

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We adapt a framework to compare integration across four synthesis processes. [::] We identify challenges and derive recommendations for future synthesis processes. [::] We recommend initiating synthesis processes concurrently with research projects. [::] We consider professional competences and management skills crucial for integration. [::] We recommend the promotion of communities of practice to support integration. [Abstract] What challenges do researchers face when leading transdisciplinary integration? We address this question by analyzing transdisciplinary integration within four thematic synthesis processes of the Swiss National Research Programme (NRP 61) ...

 

Transdisciplinary global change research: the co-creation of knowledge for sustainability

  
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 5, No. 3-4. (September 2013), pp. 420-431, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2013.07.001

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] A new framework for integrated, transdisciplinary global change research for sustainability is introduced. [::] From a practical perspective three different dimensions of integration (scientific, international and sectoral) are discussed. [::] Co-design of research agendas and co-production of knowledge are discussed as necessary integration approaches to address Future Earth research challenges. [Abstract] The challenges formulated within the Future Earth framework set the orientation for research programmes in sustainability science for the next ten years. Scientific disciplines from natural and social science will collaborate both among ...

 

Boss competence and worker well-being

  
ILR Review, Vol. 70, No. 2. (March 2017), pp. 419-450, https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793916650451

Abstract

Nearly all workers have a supervisor or “boss.” Yet little is known about how bosses influence the quality of employees’ lives. This study offers new evidence. First, the authors find that a boss’s technical competence is the single strongest predictor of a worker’s job satisfaction. Second, they demonstrate using longitudinal data, after controlling for fixed-effects, that even if a worker stays in the same job and workplace, a rise in the competence of a supervisor is associated with an improvement in ...

 

Outreach: local problems are a low research priority

  
Nature, Vol. 544, No. 7648. (05 April 2017), pp. 35-35, https://doi.org/10.1038/544035e

Abstract

[Excerpt] You ask what science can do [...] suggesting that it would be useful to work with local communities on research problems that could improve [...] quality of life (Nature 542, 391; 2017). I disagree. [...] Universities are global institutions that have the primary objectives of creating knowledge and educating people to continue the development of our societies. Building stronger links with local society and solving local problems should never be a priority for any university. ...

 

Attempts to manufacture scientific discovery

  
Nature, Vol. 94, No. 2358. (7 January 1915), pp. 512-512, https://doi.org/10.1038/094512a0

Abstract

[Excerpt] In an excellent article forming one of his admirable series of essays entitled “Science from an Easy-chair,” published in the Daily Telegraph of December 15, 1914, Sir Ray Lankester deals particularly with the case of the recent proposal that the Lister Institute should be handed over to the Medical Research Committee of the National Insurance Commission. The proposal was rejected on November 18 by the votes of the members; and Sir Ray Lankester preaches a useful sermon upon this text. ...

 

Corporate culture: protect idea factories

  
Nature, Vol. 543, No. 7646. (22 March 2017), pp. 491-491, https://doi.org/10.1038/543491a

Abstract

[Excerpt] It is unsurprising that universities have adopted corporate culture (Nature 540, 315; 10.1038/540315a2016), but surprising that they select such archaic models. Universities corporatize because they must raise funds through teaching, research and commercialization. [...] Universities are the only social institutions set up specifically to produce ideas, and this is their most valuable societal role. [...] Many universities have copied the manufacturing models of the 1950s. Power has shifted from academics to administrators. Academics are treated as interchangeable and replaceable, and performance ...

 

Data-driven predictions in the science of science

  
Science, Vol. 355, No. 6324. (03 February 2017), pp. 477-480, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aal4217

Abstract

The desire to predict discoveries—to have some idea, in advance, of what will be discovered, by whom, when, and where—pervades nearly all aspects of modern science, from individual scientists to publishers, from funding agencies to hiring committees. In this Essay, we survey the emerging and interdisciplinary field of the “science of science” and what it teaches us about the predictability of scientific discovery. We then discuss future opportunities for improving predictions derived from the science of science and its potential impact, ...

 

Are conservation biologists working too hard?

  
Biological Conservation, Vol. 166 (October 2013), pp. 186-190, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.06.029

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We analyze the work habits of conservation biologists contributing to Biological Conservation. [::] Conservation scientists conduct substantial amount of work on weekends and after office time. [::] There are geographical differences in the tendency to work on weekends or after office time. [::] Over time there has been a gradual increase in the tendency to conduct work on weekends. [Abstract] The quintessential scientist is exceedingly hardworking and antisocial, and one who would spend countless evenings and weekends buried under her/his microscopes and manuscripts. In an ...

 

HARKing: Hypothesizing After the Results are Known

  
Personality and Social Psychology Review, Vol. 2, No. 3. (01 August 1998), pp. 196-217, https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0203_4

Abstract

This article considers a practice in scientific communication termed HARKing (Hypothesizing After the Results are Known). HARKing is defined as presenting a post hoc hypothesis (i.e., one based on or informed by one's results) in one's research report as if it were, in fact, an a priori hypotheses. Several forms of HARKing are identified and survey data are presented that suggests that at least some forms of HARKing are widely practiced and widely seen as inappropriate. I identify several reasons why ...

 

A manifesto for reproducible science

  
Nature Human Behaviour, Vol. 1, No. 1. (10 January 2017), 0021, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-016-0021

Abstract

Improving the reliability and efficiency of scientific research will increase the credibility of the published scientific literature and accelerate discovery. Here we argue for the adoption of measures to optimize key elements of the scientific process: methods, reporting and dissemination, reproducibility, evaluation and incentives. There is some evidence from both simulations and empirical studies supporting the likely effectiveness of these measures, but their broad adoption by researchers, institutions, funders and journals will require iterative evaluation and improvement. We discuss the goals ...

 

Position paper for the endorsement of Free Software and Open Standards in Horizon 2020 and all publicly-funded research

  
In Free Software Foundation Europe (January 2017)

Abstract

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is a charity that empowers users to control technology by advocating for Free Software. In a digital world, Free Software is the fundament of Open Knowledge, Open Innovation and Open Science. [\n] Software is an integral part of today’s society. Our daily interactions, transactions, education, communication channels, work and life environments rely heavily on software. "Free Software" refers to all programs distributed under terms and licences that allow users to run the software for any purpose, ...

 

Collaborative influence - Develop five skills

  
Leadership Excellence, Vol. 22, No. 3. (March 2005), pp. 20-20

Abstract

[Excerpt] Organizations live or die on relationships. Your ability to create successful collaborative relationships can make or break your career. Effective executives have one skill in common — collaborative influence — the ability to get things done by getting people to collaborate and building strong collaborative networks. [Five Essential Skills] Five skills are essential to increasing your collaborative influence. [::1. Collaborative Intention] Maintaining a non-defensive presence and making a conscious personal commitment to seeking mutual gains in your relationships. [...] [::2. Truthfulness] Committing to ...

 

Five selfish reasons to work reproducibly

  
Genome Biology, Vol. 16, No. 1. (8 December 2015), 274, https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-015-0850-7

Abstract

And so, my fellow scientists: ask not what you can do for reproducibility; ask what reproducibility can do for you! Here, I present five reasons why working reproducibly pays off in the long run and is in the self-interest of every ambitious, career-oriented scientist. [Excerpt] [::Reproducibility: what's in it for me?] In this article, I present five reasons why working reproducibly pays off in the long run and is in the self-interest of every ambitious, career-oriented scientist. [::] Reason number 1: reproducibility helps to avoid ...

 

The politics of publication

  
Nature, Vol. 422, No. 6929. (20 March 2003), pp. 259-261, https://doi.org/10.1038/422259a

Abstract

Authors, reviewers and editors must act to protect the quality of research. Listen. All over the world scientists are fretting. [Excerpt] The decision about publication of a paper is the result of interaction between authors, editors and reviewers. Scientists are increasingly desperate to publish in a few top journals and are wasting time and energy manipulating their manuscripts and courting editors. As a result, the objective presentation of work, the accessibility of articles and the quality of research itself are being compromised. ...

 

Research software sustainability: report on a knowledge exchange workshop

  
(February 2016)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] Without software, modern research would not be possible. Understandably, people tend to marvel at results rather than the tools used in their discovery, which means the fundamental role of software in research has been largely overlooked. But whether it is widely recognised or not, research is inexorably connected to the software that is used to generate results, and if we continue to overlook software we put at risk the reliability and reproducibility of the research itself. [\n] The adoption of software is accompanied by new risks - many of ...

 

Theory of citing

  
In Handbook of Optimization in Complex Networks, Vol. 57 (11 Sep 2012), pp. 463-505, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0754-6_16

Abstract

We present empirical data on misprints in citations to twelve high-profile papers. The great majority of misprints are identical to misprints in articles that earlier cited the same paper. The distribution of the numbers of misprint repetitions follows a power law. We develop a stochastic model of the citation process, which explains these findings and shows that about 70-90% of scientific citations are copied from the lists of references used in other papers. Citation copying can explain not only why some misprints become popular, but also why some ...

 

Editorial: evidence-based guidelines for avoiding the most prevalent and serious APA error in journal article submissions - The citation error

  
Research in the Schools, Vol. 17, No. 2. (2010), pp. i-xxiv

Abstract

In a previous editorial, Onwuegbuzie, Combs, Slate, and Frels (2010) discussed the findings of Combs, Onwuegbuzie, and Frels (2010), who identified the 60 most common American Psychological Association (APA) errors—with the most common error being incorrect use of numbers that was committed by 57.3% of authors. However, they did not analyze citation errors, which stem from a failure “to make certain that each source referenced appears in both places [text and reference list] and that the text citation and reference list ...

 

Influence of omitted citations on the bibliometric statistics of the major Manufacturing journals

  
Scientometrics, Vol. 103, No. 3. (2015), pp. 1083-1122, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-015-1583-9

Abstract

Bibliometrics is a relatively young and rapidly evolving discipline. Essential for this discipline are bibliometric databases and their information content concerning scientific publications and relevant citations. Databases are unfortunately affected by errors, whose main consequence is represented by omitted citations, i.e., citations that should be ascribed to a certain (cited) paper but, for some reason, are lost. This paper studies the impact of omitted citations on the bibliometric statistics of the major Manufacturing journals. The methodology adopted is based on a ...

 

Accuracy of cited references: the role of citation databases

  
College & Research Libraries, Vol. 67, No. 4. (01 July 2006), pp. 292-303, https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.67.4.292

Abstract

The nature and extent of errors made by Science Citation Index ExpandedTM (SCIE) and SciFinder® ScholarTM (SFS) during data entry have been characterized by analysis of more than 5,400 cited articles from 204 randomly selected cited-article lists published in three core chemistry journals. Failure to map cited articles to target-source articles was due to transcription errors, target-source article errors, omitted cited articles, and reason unknown. Mapping error rates ranged from 1.2 to 6.9 percent. SCIE and SFS also were found to ...

 

Characteristics of doctoral students who commit citation errors

  
Library Review, Vol. 55, No. 3. (March 2006), pp. 195-208, https://doi.org/10.1108/00242530610655993

Abstract

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the citation error rate and quality of reference lists in doctoral dissertation proposals. This research also sought to examine the relationship between perfectionism and frequency of citation errors and the adherence of the reference list to the fidelity of the chosen citation style among doctoral students. Also of interest was to determine which demographic variables predict citation errors and quality of the reference list. [Design/methodology/approach] Participants were 64 doctoral students from various disciplines enrolled in ...

 

It's impossible to conduct research without software, say 7 out of 10 UK researchers

  
Software and research, Vol. 5 (2014), 1536

Abstract

No one knows how much software is used in research. Look around any lab and you’ll see software – both standard and bespoke – being used by all disciplines and seniorities of researchers. Software is clearly fundamental to research, but we can’t prove this without evidence. And this lack of evidence is the reason why we ran a survey of researchers at 15 Russell Group universities to find out about their software use and background. [Excerpt: Headline figures] [::] 92% of academics use ...

 

Copyright contradictions in scholarly publishing

  
First Monday, Vol. 7, No. 11. (04 November 2002), 1006, https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v7i11.1006

Abstract

This paper examines contradictions in how copyright works with the publishing of scholarly journals. These contradictions have to do with the protection of the authors’ interest and have become apparent with the rise of open access publishing as an alternative to the traditional commercial model of selling journal subscriptions. Authors may well be better served, as may the public which supports research, by open access journals because of its wider readership and early indications of greater scholarly impact. This paper reviews ...

 

Ethics among scholars in academic publishing

  
In 2012 Proceedings of the Information Systems Educators Conference (2012), 1948

Abstract

This paper offers a survey of the contemporary and common-place ethical breaches concerning authorship, research, and publishing in today’s scholarly production, as juxtaposed with some of the predominant standards and guidelines that have been developed to direct academic publishing practices. While the paper may suggest the need for an updated and comprehensive set of guidelines for multiple discipline areas, the purpose here is to prepare the theoretical framework for a future computing discipline-specific study of ethical authorship and related concepts in ...

 

Good data are not enough

  
Nature, Vol. 539, No. 7627. (2 November 2016), pp. 23-25, https://doi.org/10.1038/539023a

Abstract

A vibrant scientific culture encourages many interpretations of evidence, argues Avi Loeb. [Excerpt] [...] Most research funding is allocated assuming that the highest-quality data will inevitably deliver useful scientific interpretation and theoretical concepts, which can be tested and refined by future data. [...] To truly move forward, free thought must be encouraged outside the mainstream. Multiple interpretations of existing data and alternative motivations for collecting new data must be supported. [...] [Blinkered view] Mayan cosmologists had high social status. They got generous support ...

 

Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 11. (15 March 2016), pp. 2982-2987, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1518798113

Abstract

[Significance] The remarkable ecological success of the human species has been attributed to our capacity to overcome environmental challenges through the development of complex technologies. Complex technologies are typically beyond the inventive capacities of individuals and result from a population process by which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population’s ability to develop technologies is positively affected by its size and connectedness. Here, we present an experiment demonstrating that partially connected groups ...

 

The natural selection of bad science

  
Open Science, Vol. 3, No. 9. (01 September 2016), 160384, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160384

Abstract

Poor research design and data analysis encourage false-positive findings. Such poor methods persist despite perennial calls for improvement, suggesting that they result from something more than just misunderstanding. The persistence of poor methods results partly from incentives that favour them, leading to the natural selection of bad science. This dynamic requires no conscious strategizing—no deliberate cheating nor loafing—by scientists, only that publication is a principal factor for career advancement. Some normative methods of analysis have almost certainly been selected to further ...

 

The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship

  
Scientific Data, Vol. 3 (15 March 2016), 160018, https://doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.18

Abstract

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders—representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers—have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, ...

 

'We're going backward!'

  
Communication of the ACM, Vol. 59, No. 10. (September 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1145/2993746

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] As we move toward the present, the media of our expression seems to have decreasing longevity. Of course, newer media have not been around as long as the older ones so their longevity has not been demonstrated but I think it is arguable that the more recent media do not have the resilience of stone or baked clay. Modern photographs may not last more than 150–200 years before they fade or disintegrate. Modern books, unless archival paper is used, ...

 

The hard road to reproducibility

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6308. (07 October 2016), pp. 142-142, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.354.6308.142

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] A couple years ago, we published a paper applying computational fluid dynamics to the aerodynamics of flying snakes. More recently, I asked a new student to replicate the findings of that paper, both as a training opportunity and to help us choose which code to use in future research. Replicating a published study is always difficult—there are just so many conditions that need to be matched and details that can't be overlooked—but I thought this case was relatively straightforward. ...

 

JRC data policy

  
Vol. 27163 EN (2015), https://doi.org/10.2788/607378

Abstract

[Executive summary] The work on the JRC Data Policy followed the task identified in the JRC Management Plan 2014 to develop a dedicated data policy to complement the JRC Policy on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Supporting Guidance, and to promote open access to research data in the context of Horizon 2020. [\n] Important policy commitments and the relevant regulatory basis within the European Union and the European Commission include: the Commission Decision on the reuse of Commission documents, Commission ...

 

Open data: curation is under-resourced

  
Nature, Vol. 538, No. 7623. (05 October 2016), pp. 41-41, https://doi.org/10.1038/538041d

Abstract

[Excerpt] Science funders and researchers need to recognize the time, resources and effort required to curate open data [...]. There is no reliable business model to finance the curation and maintenance of data repositories. [...] Curation is not fully automated for most data types. This means that — in the life sciences, for example — many popular databases must resort to time-consuming manual curation to check data quality, reliability, provenance, format and metadata [...]. To make open data effective as a ...

 

Corporate culture has no place in academia

  
Nature, Vol. 538, No. 7623. (3 October 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1038/538007a

Abstract

‘Academic capitalism’ contributed to the mishandling of the Macchiarini case by officials at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, argues Olof Hallonsten. [Excerpt] [...] As academic capitalism spreads, universities abandon traditional meritocratic and collegial governance to hunt money, prestige and a stronger brand. [...] Yet this conduct goes against fundamental values of academia — the careful scrutiny of all claims, and of the research (and teaching) portfolios of those making such claims. This core principle in the self-organization of the academic system (studied ...

 

Who is accountable?

  
Nature, Vol. 450, No. 7166. (31 October 2007), pp. 1-1, https://doi.org/10.1038/450001a

Abstract

How the responsibilities of co-authors for a scientific paper's integrity could be made more explicit. ...

 

Authorship matters

  
Nature Materials, Vol. 7, No. 2. (01 February 2008), pp. 91-91, https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat2112

Abstract

Individual contributions should be carefully evaluated when compiling the author list of a scientific paper. ...

 

Hyperauthorship: a postmodern perversion or evidence of a structural shift in scholarly communication practices?

  
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 52, No. 7. (2001), pp. 558-569, https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.1097

Abstract

Classical assumptions about the nature and ethical entailments of authorship (the standard model) are being challenged by developments in scientific collaboration and multiple authorship. In the biomedical research community, multiple authorship has increased to such an extent that the trustworthiness of the scientific communication system has been called into question. Documented abuses, such as honorific authorship, have serious implications in terms of the acknowledgment of authority, allocation of credit, and assigning of accountability. Within the biomedical world it has been proposed ...

 

Credit where credit is due? Regulation, research integrity and the attribution of authorship in the health sciences

  
Social Science & Medicine, Vol. 70, No. 9. (May 2010), pp. 1458-1465, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.01.013

Abstract

Despite attempts at clear direction in international, national and journal guidelines, attribution of authorship can be a confusing area for both new and established researchers. As journal articles are valuable intellectual property, authorship can be hotly contested. Individual authors' responsibilities for the integrity of article content have not been well explored. Semi-structured interviews (n = 17) were conducted with staff, student advocates and doctoral candidates working in health research in two universities in Australia. Stratified sampling ensured participants reflected a range of experience ...

 

Responsible authorship: why researchers must forgo honorary authorship

  
Accountability in Research, Vol. 18, No. 2. (9 March 2011), pp. 76-90, https://doi.org/10.1080/08989621.2011.557297

Abstract

Although widespread throughout the biomedical sciences, the practice of honorary authorship?the listing of authors who fail to merit inclusion as authors by authorship criteria?has received relatively little sustained attention. Is there something wrong with honorary authorship, or is it only a problem when used in conjunction with other unethical authorship practices like ghostwriting? Numerous sets of authorship guidelines discourage the practice, but its ubiquity throughout biomedicine suggests that there is a need to say more about honorary authorship. Despite its general ...

 

Academic authorship: who, why and in what order?

  
Health Renaissance, Vol. 11, No. 2. (19 June 2013), https://doi.org/10.3126/hren.v11i2.8214

Abstract

We are frequently asked by our colleagues and students for advice on authorship for scientific articles. This short paper outlines some of the issues that we have experienced and the advice we usually provide. This editorial follows on from our work on submitting a paper1 and also on writing an academic paper for publication.2 We should like to start by noting that, in our view, there exist two separate, but related issues: (a) authorship and (b) order of authors. The issue of authorship centres on the notion of who can be ...

 

Why scientists must share their research code

  
Nature (13 September 2016), https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2016.20504

Abstract

'Reproducibility editor' Victoria Stodden explains the growing movement to make code and data available to others. [Excerpt] [...] [::What does computational reproducibility mean?] It means that all details of computation — code and data — are made routinely available to others. If I can run your code on your data, then I can understand what you did. We need to expose all the steps that went into any discovery that relies on a computer. [::What’s the scientific value of running the same data with the ...

 

Transparency in ecology and evolution: real problems, real solutions

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 31, No. 9. (September 2016), pp. 711-719, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.07.002

Abstract

To make progress scientists need to know what other researchers have found and how they found it. However, transparency is often insufficient across much of ecology and evolution. Researchers often fail to report results and methods in detail sufficient to permit interpretation and meta-analysis, and many results go entirely unreported. Further, these unreported results are often a biased subset. Thus the conclusions we can draw from the published literature are themselves often biased and sometimes might be entirely incorrect. Fortunately there ...

 

Archiving primary data: solutions for long-term studies

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 30, No. 10. (2015), pp. 581-589, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.07.006

Abstract

The recent trend for journals to require open access to primary data included in publications has been embraced by many biologists, but has caused apprehension amongst researchers engaged in long-term ecological and evolutionary studies. A worldwide survey of 73 principal investigators (Pls) with long-term studies revealed positive attitudes towards sharing data with the agreement or involvement of the PI, and 93% of PIs have historically shared data. Only 8% were in favor of uncontrolled, open access to primary data while 63% ...

 

Stop ignoring misconduct

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7618. (1 September 2016), pp. 29-30, https://doi.org/10.1038/537029a

Abstract

Efforts to reduce irreproducibility in research must also tackle the temptation to cheat, argue Donald S. Kornfeld and Sandra L. Titus. [Excerpt: Preventing misconduct] To diminish the threat that misconduct poses to science, scientists and society: [::] Authorities should acknowledge that deliberate misconduct is an important contributor to irreproducibility. [::] Mentors should be evaluated to assure quality; those who contribute to misconduct should be penalized. [::] Institutions and government agencies should have procedures to protect whistle-blowers from retaliation. [::] Senior faculty members who are found guilty of ...

 

Hedonism and the choice of everyday activities

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 35. (30 August 2016), pp. 9769-9773, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1519998113

Abstract

[Significance] Decisions we make every day about how to invest our time have crucial personal and societal consequences. Most theories of motivation propose that our daily choices of activities aim to maximize positive affective states but fail to explain when people decide to engage in unpleasant yet necessary activities. We tracked the activities and moods of over 28,000 people in real time and demonstrated that people seek mood-enhancing activities when they feel bad and unpleasant activities when they feel good. These findings ...

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.