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Selection: with tag research-funding [62 articles] 

 

Reviewers are blinkered by bibliometrics

  
Nature, Vol. 544, No. 7651. (26 April 2017), pp. 411-412, https://doi.org/10.1038/544411a

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Although journal impact factors (JIFs) were developed to assess journals and say little about any individual paper, reviewers routinely justify their evaluations on the basis of where candidates have published. [...] As economists who study science and innovation, we see engrained processes working against cherished goals. Scientists we interview routinely say that they dare not propose bold projects for funding in part because of expectations that they will produce a steady stream of papers in journals with high impact ...

 

Research on a razor's edge

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6342. (09 June 2017), pp. 1094-1094, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.356.6342.1094

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Scientists in the United States face a shortage of tenure-track faculty jobs and fierce competition for a shrinking pool of grants. These dimming prospects reflect decades of underinvestment in the sciences. The current administration threatens to make things worse. We are all doing research on a razor's edge. [\n] It's no surprise that American scientists are becoming increasingly curious about opportunities elsewhere in the world. U.S. spending on research and development still ranks among the highest, but those who are ...

 

Escape from the impact factor

  
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics, Vol. 8, No. 1. (2008), pp. 5-7

Abstract

As Editor-in-Chief of the journal Nature, I am concerned by the tendency within academic administrations to focus on a journal’s impact factor when judging the worth of scientific contributions by researchers, affecting promotions, recruitment and, in some countries, financial bonuses for each paper. Our own internal research demonstrates how a high journal impact factor can be the skewed result of many citations of a few papers rather than the average level of the majority, reducing its value as an objective measure ...

 

Academia’s never-ending selection for productivity

  
Scientometrics In Scientometrics, Vol. 103, No. 1. (15 February 2015), pp. 333-336, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-015-1534-5

Abstract

[Excerpt] Over the last decade, a debate has been emerging on “Academia’s obsession with quantity” (Lawrence 2007; Fischer et al. 2012a) and the subsequent Impact Factor Race, an unhealthy game played by scientists (Cherubini 2008; Brischoux and Cook 2009). Despite being widely despised by the scientific community (but see Loyola et al. 2012), the “publish or perish” dogma and the use of productivity indices (e.g., journal’s impact factor, number of published articles) to assess a researcher’s output seem to hold on, ...

 

Attempts to manufacture scientific discovery

  
Nature, Vol. 94, No. 2358. (7 January 1915), pp. 512-512, https://doi.org/10.1038/094512a0

Abstract

[Excerpt] In an excellent article forming one of his admirable series of essays entitled “Science from an Easy-chair,” published in the Daily Telegraph of December 15, 1914, Sir Ray Lankester deals particularly with the case of the recent proposal that the Lister Institute should be handed over to the Medical Research Committee of the National Insurance Commission. The proposal was rejected on November 18 by the votes of the members; and Sir Ray Lankester preaches a useful sermon upon this text. ...

 

Corporate culture: protect idea factories

  
Nature, Vol. 543, No. 7646. (22 March 2017), pp. 491-491, https://doi.org/10.1038/543491a

Abstract

[Excerpt] It is unsurprising that universities have adopted corporate culture (Nature 540, 315; 10.1038/540315a2016), but surprising that they select such archaic models. Universities corporatize because they must raise funds through teaching, research and commercialization. [...] Universities are the only social institutions set up specifically to produce ideas, and this is their most valuable societal role. [...] Many universities have copied the manufacturing models of the 1950s. Power has shifted from academics to administrators. Academics are treated as interchangeable and replaceable, and performance ...

 

Communication: science censorship is a global issue

  
Nature, Vol. 542, No. 7640. (08 February 2017), pp. 165-165, https://doi.org/10.1038/542165b

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Regrettably, suppression of public scientific information is already the norm, or is being attempted, in many countries [...]. We fear that such gagging orders could encourage senior bureaucrats to use funding as a tool with which to rein in academic freedoms. [...] The response of scientists to this type of coercion has been to share scientific information widely and openly using such legal means as social media to defend facts and transparency [...] ...

 

Position paper for the endorsement of Free Software and Open Standards in Horizon 2020 and all publicly-funded research

  
In Free Software Foundation Europe (January 2017)

Abstract

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is a charity that empowers users to control technology by advocating for Free Software. In a digital world, Free Software is the fundament of Open Knowledge, Open Innovation and Open Science. [\n] Software is an integral part of today’s society. Our daily interactions, transactions, education, communication channels, work and life environments rely heavily on software. "Free Software" refers to all programs distributed under terms and licences that allow users to run the software for any purpose, ...

 

The mismeasurement of science

  
Current Biology, Vol. 17, No. 15. (07 August 2007), pp. R583-R585, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2007.06.014

Abstract

[Excerpt:Impact factors and citations] Crucially, impact factors are distorted by positive feedback — many citations are not based on reading the paper but by reading other papers, particularly reviews. One study even suggested that, of cited articles, only some 20% had actually been read. [...] Nevertheless, citations are now being used to make quantitative comparisons between scientists. [...] [Changes in behaviour] Unfortunately, the use of these measures is having damaging effects on perceptions and on behaviour; these I list below. Please note that ...

 

The politics of publication

  
Nature, Vol. 422, No. 6929. (20 March 2003), pp. 259-261, https://doi.org/10.1038/422259a

Abstract

Authors, reviewers and editors must act to protect the quality of research. Listen. All over the world scientists are fretting. [Excerpt] The decision about publication of a paper is the result of interaction between authors, editors and reviewers. Scientists are increasingly desperate to publish in a few top journals and are wasting time and energy manipulating their manuscripts and courting editors. As a result, the objective presentation of work, the accessibility of articles and the quality of research itself are being compromised. ...

 

Lost in publication: how measurement harms science

  
Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics, Vol. 8 (03 June 2008), pp. 9-11, https://doi.org/10.3354/esep00079

Abstract

Measurement of scientific productivity is difficult. The measures used (impact factor of the journal, citations to the paper being measured) are crude. But these measures are now so universally adopted that they determine most things that matter: tenure or unemployment, a postdoctoral grant or none, success or failure. As a result, scientists have been forced to downgrade their primary aim from making discoveries to publishing as many papers as possible—and trying to work them into high impact factor journals. Consequently, scientific ...

 

Research software sustainability: report on a knowledge exchange workshop

  
(February 2016)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] Without software, modern research would not be possible. Understandably, people tend to marvel at results rather than the tools used in their discovery, which means the fundamental role of software in research has been largely overlooked. But whether it is widely recognised or not, research is inexorably connected to the software that is used to generate results, and if we continue to overlook software we put at risk the reliability and reproducibility of the research itself. [\n] The adoption of software is accompanied by new risks - many of ...

 

Influence of omitted citations on the bibliometric statistics of the major Manufacturing journals

  
Scientometrics, Vol. 103, No. 3. (2015), pp. 1083-1122, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-015-1583-9

Abstract

Bibliometrics is a relatively young and rapidly evolving discipline. Essential for this discipline are bibliometric databases and their information content concerning scientific publications and relevant citations. Databases are unfortunately affected by errors, whose main consequence is represented by omitted citations, i.e., citations that should be ascribed to a certain (cited) paper but, for some reason, are lost. This paper studies the impact of omitted citations on the bibliometric statistics of the major Manufacturing journals. The methodology adopted is based on a ...

 

Measuring scientific impact beyond citation counts

  
D-Lib Magazine, Vol. 22, No. 9/10. (September 2016), https://doi.org/10.1045/september2016-patton

Abstract

The measurement of scientific progress remains a significant challenge exasperated by the use of multiple different types of metrics that are often incorrectly used, overused, or even explicitly abused. Several metrics such as h-index or journal impact factor (JIF) are often used as a means to assess whether an author, article, or journal creates an "impact" on science. Unfortunately, external forces can be used to manipulate these metrics thereby diluting the value of their intended, original purpose. This work highlights these ...

 

Open data: curation is under-resourced

  
Nature, Vol. 538, No. 7623. (05 October 2016), pp. 41-41, https://doi.org/10.1038/538041d

Abstract

[Excerpt] Science funders and researchers need to recognize the time, resources and effort required to curate open data [...]. There is no reliable business model to finance the curation and maintenance of data repositories. [...] Curation is not fully automated for most data types. This means that — in the life sciences, for example — many popular databases must resort to time-consuming manual curation to check data quality, reliability, provenance, format and metadata [...]. To make open data effective as a ...

 

Corporate culture has no place in academia

  
Nature, Vol. 538, No. 7623. (3 October 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1038/538007a

Abstract

‘Academic capitalism’ contributed to the mishandling of the Macchiarini case by officials at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, argues Olof Hallonsten. [Excerpt] [...] As academic capitalism spreads, universities abandon traditional meritocratic and collegial governance to hunt money, prestige and a stronger brand. [...] Yet this conduct goes against fundamental values of academia — the careful scrutiny of all claims, and of the research (and teaching) portfolios of those making such claims. This core principle in the self-organization of the academic system (studied ...

 

Opinion: science in the age of selfies

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 34. (23 August 2016), pp. 9384-9387, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1609793113

Abstract

[Excerpt] [\n] [...] [\n] Here there is a paradox: Today, there are many more scientists, and much more money is spent on research, yet the pace of fundamental innovation, the kinds of theories and engineering practices that will feed the pipeline of future progress, appears, to some observers, including us, to be slowing [...]. Why might that be the case? [\n] One argument is that “theoretical models” may not even exist for some branches of science, at least not in the ...

 

Brexit watch: scientists grapple with the fallout

  

Abstract

Xenophobia and mobility fears among issues facing researchers two weeks on. [Excerpt] Two weeks after the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union, the future remains opaque. Concerns within the research community are particularly intense for those who rely on the EU for funding, or who have the right to work in the United Kingdom only because they are citizens of other EU countries. Here is Nature’s selection of the week’s post-Brexit science news. [\n] [...] ...

 

Beat it, impact factor! Publishing elite turns against controversial metric

  
Nature, Vol. 535, No. 7611. (8 July 2016), pp. 210-211, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2016.20224

Abstract

Senior staff at leading journals want to end inappropriate use of the measure. [Excerpt] [...] Calculated by various companies and promoted by publishers, journal impact factors (JIFs) are a measure of the average number of citations that articles published by a journal in the previous two years have received in the current year. [\n] They were designed to indicate the quality of journals, but researchers often use the metric to assess the quality of individual papers — and even, in some cases, their ...

 

Science 101: building the foundations for real understanding

  
Science, Vol. 330, No. 6012. (02 December 2010), pp. 1764-1765, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1186994

Abstract

It's not just about evolution anymore. Growing anti-science sentiment in the United States now infuses public discourse on conservation, vaccination, distribution of research funds, and climate change (1). Low rates of scientific literacy (2) exacerbate the problem. Although the public recognizes its indebtedness to the products of scientific knowledge, few understand much about the nature of that knowledge or the processes that generated it (3). Without a basic understanding of how science works, the public is vulnerable to antiscience propaganda, which ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 30

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   receptivity   record-to-update-or-delete   red-list   redd   redistributable-scientific-information   reference-manual   reforestation   refugia   regeneration   regional-climate   regional-climate-models   regional-scale   regression   regression-tree-analysis   regulating-services   reinforcement   reinforcement-learning   reinventing-weels   reiteration   relative-distance-similarity   relative-distance-similarity-ancillary   remote-sensing   renewable-energy   renewable-energy-directive   repeatability   repellent-species   replicability   reporting   representative-concentration-pathways   reproducibility   reproducible-research   reproduction   reproductive-effort   resampling   research-funding   research-funding-vs-public-outcome   research-management   research-metrics   research-team-size   reservoir-management   reservoir-services   resilience   resin   resistance   resources-exploitation   respiration   restoration   resurvey-of-semi-permanent   retraction   review   review-publication   review-scopus-european-biodiversity-indicators   revision-control-system   rewarding-best-research-practices   rhamnus-cathartica   rhamnus-catharticus   rhamnus-frangula   rhamnus-saxatilis   rhamnus-spp   rhizophora-apiculata   rhizophora-mangle   rhododendron   rhododendron-arboreum   rhododendron-ferrugineum   rhododendron-periclymenoides   rhododendron-ponticum   rhododendron-spp   rhododendron-viscosum   rhopalicus-tutela   rhus-spp   rhus-typhina   rhyacionia-buoliana   rhyacionia-frustrana   rhyssa-persuasoria   rhytisma   ribes-alpinum   ribes-rubrum   ribes-uva-crispa   ring-analysis   ring-width-chronologies   ringspot-virus   riparian-ecosystem   riparian-forest   riparian-zones   risk-analysis   risk-assessment   risk-reduction   river-flow   river-networks   river-restoration   roads   robert-hooke   robinia-pseudoacacia   robinia-spp   robust-modelling   rockfalls   rodent   romania   root-deterioration  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Harsh grades for ‘Europe’s MIT’

  

Abstract

[Excerpt] The European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) gets poor grades from the European Union’s financial watchdog. In a report released today, the European Court of Auditors said that EIT needs some fundamental changes if it is to fulfill its job of sparking innovation in Europe. [\n] EIT, officially launched in 2008, was the idea of former President of the European Commission José Manuel Barroso. He hoped that the European Union could create an institute that would help forge links between ...

 

Grant giving: global funders to focus on interdisciplinarity

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 7569. (16 September 2015), pp. 313-315, https://doi.org/10.1038/525313a

Abstract

Granting bodies need more data on how much they are spending on work that transcends disciplines, and to what end, explains Rick Rylance. [Excerpt] Three arguments are often made in favour of interdisciplinary research. [::] First, complex modern problems such as climate change and resource security are not amenable to single-discipline investigation; they often require many types of expertise across the biological, physical and social disciplines. [::] Second, discoveries are said to be more likely on the boundaries between fields, where the ...

 

Interdisciplinarity: how to catalyse collaboration

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 7569. (16 September 2015), pp. 315-317, https://doi.org/10.1038/525315a

Abstract

Turn the fraught flirtation between the social and biophysical sciences into fruitful partnerships with these five principles, urge Rebekah R. Brown, Ana Deletic and Tony H. F. Wong. [Excerpt] An urgent push to bridge the divide between the biophysical and the social sciences is crucial. It is the only way to drive global sustainable development that delivers social inclusion, environmental sustainability and economic prosperity1. Sustainability is the classic 'wicked' problem, characterized by poorly defined requirements, unclear boundaries and contested causes that no ...

 

Interdisciplinary research by the numbers

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 7569. (16 September 2015), pp. 306-307, https://doi.org/10.1038/525306a

Abstract

An analysis reveals the extent and impact of research that bridges disciplines. [Excerpt] Interdisciplinary work is considered crucial by scientists, policymakers and funders — but how widespread is it really, and what impact does it have? Scholars say that the concept is complex to define and measure, but efforts to map papers by the disciplines of the journals they appear in and by their citation patterns are — tentatively — revealing the growth and influence of interdisciplinary research. [\n][...] [Interdisciplinary research takes time to ...

Visual summary

 

Why interdisciplinary research matters

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 305. (2015), https://doi.org/10.1038/525305a

Abstract

Scientists must work together to save the world. A special issue asks how they can scale disciplinary walls. [Excerpt] Scientists must work together to save the world. A special issue asks how they can scale disciplinary walls. To solve the grand challenges facing society — energy, water, climate, food, health — scientists and social scientists must work together. But research that transcends conventional academic boundaries is harder to fund, do, review and publish — and those who attempt it struggle for recognition ...

 

Bio-based economy in Europe: state of play and future potential - Part 2 Summary of position papers received in response to the European Commission's public on-line consultation

  

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] This report summarises the 35 position papers received from organisations directly or indirectly linked to the bio-based economy in response to the public consultation on the ‘bio-based economy for Europe: state of play and future potential’. [Definition of a bio-based economy] The respondents support a public goods-oriented global and coherent strategy for a sustainable bio-based economy focusing on a recycling community, conservation of ecosystems and equitable sharing. An alternative definition of the bio-economy could be: [\n]A public goods-oriented bio-based economy based on: [::] […] production paradigms that rely ...

 

Competitive science: is competition ruining science?

  
Infection and Immunity, Vol. 83, No. 4. (01 April 2015), pp. 1229-1233, https://doi.org/10.1128/iai.02939-14

Abstract

Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. ...

 

The future of science will soon be upon us

  
Nature, Vol. 524, No. 7564. (12 August 2015), pp. 137-137, https://doi.org/10.1038/524137a

Abstract

The European Commission has abandoned consideration of 'Science 2.0', finding it too ambitious. That was the wrong call, says Colin Macilwain. [Excerpt] As the staff of the European Commission head for the beaches this August, they have been asked to ponder the future of science. Research commissioner Carlos Moedas has announced his priorities as being “open science” and “open innovation”, and invited his team to report back with its ideas on how to achieve that. [\n] These goals sound laudable enough, but they're ...

 

Extramural work: to serve or not to serve

  
Nature, Vol. 523, No. 7562. (29 July 2015), pp. 627-629, https://doi.org/10.1038/nj7562-627a

Abstract

[Excerpt] When committees come knocking, scientists need to know which requests will benefit them and which will only steal their time nd how to tell the difference. Anastasia Ailamaki fondly remembers her first experience serving on a grant-application review committee for the US National Science Foundation [...] She credits it with helping her to prepare her own successful application for an NSF early-career-development grant. [\n] But like many researchers, Ailamaki has at times been overloaded with requests for her service. “First reaction ...

 

How academia resembles a drug gang

  
In 8th Max Weber Programme Academic Careers Observatory Conference (2013), https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2407748

Abstract

Academic systems rely on the existence of a supply of “outsiders” ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail. Drawing on data from the US, Germany and the UK, this paper looks at how the academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders. ...

 

Funders must encourage scientists to share

  
Nature, Vol. 522, No. 7555. (11 June 2015), pp. 129-129, https://doi.org/10.1038/522129a

Abstract

To realize the full potential of large data sets, researchers must agree on better ways to pass data around, says Martin Bobrow. [Excerpt] How can we make best use of the vast amounts of data on genomics, epidemiology and population-level health being collected by researchers? Maximizing the benefits depends on how well we as a scientific community share information. [...] [\n] Both those who generate data and those who want to use them expressed frustration at the way that data-access processes are ...

 

Core services: reward bioinformaticians

  
Nature, Vol. 520, No. 7546. (8 April 2015), pp. 151-152, https://doi.org/10.1038/520151a

Abstract

Biological data will continue to pile up unless those who analyse it are recognized as creative collaborators in need of career paths, says Jeffrey Chang. [Excerpt] The US Precision Medicine Initiative, announced in January, relies on bioinformatics. The US$215-million project calls for collecting medical, physiological and genomic data from more than one million people in the United States, and aims to find patterns across individuals to improve health care. It does not address a worsening deficiency in the scientific community: biological data ...

 

The future of the postdoc

  
Nature, Vol. 520, No. 7546. (7 April 2015), pp. 144-147, https://doi.org/10.1038/520144a

Abstract

There is a growing number of postdocs and few places in academia for them to go. But change could be on the way. [Excerpt] [...] These highly skilled scientists are a major engine driving scientific research, yet they are often poorly rewarded and have no way to progress in academia. The number of postdocs in science has ballooned: in the United States alone, it jumped by 150% between 2000 and 2012. But the number of tenured and other full-time faculty positions ...

 

Biochemist questions peer review at UK funding agency

  

Abstract

[Excerpt] Many researchers do little more than grumble if a funding agency declines their grant applications. But when the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) turned down two proposals from biochemist Ian Eperon – despite high scores from peer reviewers — he decided to find out how closely the agency follows the evaluations it invites from experts. After much chasing and a freedom-of-information request, he has received figures that surprised him: in 2013–14, the scores given to grant proposals in his field ...

 

Bibliometrics: the citation game

  
Nature, Vol. 510, No. 7506. (25 June 2014), pp. 470-471, https://doi.org/10.1038/510470a

Abstract

Jonathan Adams takes the measure of the uses and misuses of scholarly impact. ...

 

Framework for participative reflection on the accomplishment of transdisciplinary research programs

  
Environmental Science & Policy, Vol. 13, No. 8. (22 December 2010), pp. 733-741, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2010.08.002

Abstract

In response to the increasingly complex social–ecological issues facing society, there is a growing trend to conduct environmental research in large collaborative programs. This approach is described as transdisciplinary research as it transcends formal disciplinary boundaries, explicitly acknowledges that many different perspectives are relevant to the resolution of complex problems, and actively involves the users of research. This poses challenges for the evaluation of “impact” as any evaluation process must take into consideration the different expectations, values, culture, language and reward ...

 

Inequality quantified: mind the gender gap

  
Nature, Vol. 495, No. 7439. (6 March 2013), pp. 22-24, https://doi.org/10.1038/495022a

Abstract

Despite improvements, female scientists continue to face discrimination, unequal pay and funding disparities. ...

 

Improving the culture of interdisciplinary collaboration in ecology by expanding measures of success

  
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 12, No. 1. (February 2014), pp. 39-47, https://doi.org/10.1890/120370

Abstract

[Abstract] Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential to understand ecological systems at scales critical to human decision making. Current reward structures are problematic for scientists engaged in interdisciplinary research, particularly early career researchers, because academic culture tends to value only some research outputs, such as primary-authored publications. Here, we present a framework for the costs and benefits of collaboration, with a focus on early career stages, and show how the implementation of novel measures of success can help defray the costs of collaboration. ...

 

What it takes

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6190. (20 June 2014), pp. 1422-1422, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6190.1422

Abstract

[Excerpt] Not long ago, Science Careers posted a widget—you can find it at http://scim.ag/1pwIaAF—that lets early-career scientists calculate the probability that they'll someday become principal investigators (PIs), on the basis of a few standard publication metrics. [...] The Science Careers widget is less accurate than the full-bore model, but it has the virtue of focusing attention on a handful of the most important parameters. [...] 1. Be male. The widget's probability plot displays two lines: red for women and blue for ...

 

Uprooting researchers can drive them out of science

  
Nature, Vol. 510, No. 7505. (18 June 2014), pp. 313-313, https://doi.org/10.1038/510313a

Abstract

Making early-career scientists change institutions frequently is disruptive and — with modern technology — unnecessary, says Russell Garwood. [Excerpt] For some scientists, of course, the opportunity to move around is wonderful. It is perfect for people with wanderlust, who lack personal ties or who thrive in varied surroundings and on ephemeral contracts. However, for many others this migration-centred system is hugely disruptive, and can add to the forces that squeeze talented scientists out of academia and into other careers. The ‘young’ people ...

 

What's in a number?

  
Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 111, No. 4. (01 October 2011), pp. 951-953, https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00935.2011

Abstract

[Excerpt] the scientific publishing world is being influenced by the Impact Factor (IF) just as the wine industry has been, and continues to be, influenced by a certain Robert Parker. There is little doubt that, just as Parker's personal taste in wine has caused winemakers in droves to change their procedures and wine styles, the IF has driven at least some journals to considerably alter their publications practices to raise IF. The tail is wagging the dog big time, and this ...

 

How to break free from the stifling grip of luxury journals

  
The Conversation (2013), 21669

Abstract

[excerpt] [...] Intense competition for space in key journals means that the editorial process often involves multiple rounds of revision, review and resubmission, causing long delays in publication. Additional experimental data and information are often demanded by reviewers who might later, as authors, be competing for space in the same journals. Much of this data is then relegated to supplementary appendices. The experience can be highly dispiriting for researchers. I see a solution in open-access journals. They generally cover their costs upfront, for ...

 

Making Every Scientist a Research Funder

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6171. (07 February 2014), pp. 598-598, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.343.6171.598

Abstract

A radical proposal to revamp peer review would give scientists an even bigger role in deciding how to distribute U.S. research dollars—at a fraction of the current cost. ...

 

Is publication rate an equal opportunity metric?

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 28, No. 1. (January 2013), pp. 7-8, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2012.10.014

Abstract

Publication quantity is frequently used as a ranking metric for employment, promotion, and grant success, and is considered an unbiased metric for comparing applicants. However, research suggests that women publish fewer papers, such that the measure may not be equitable. We suggest reasons for the disparity, and potential future remedies. Publication quality and impact provide more equitable metrics of research performance and should be stressed above publication quantity. ...

 

Letter to the Editor - Comment on editorial on software distribution in science

  
Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, Vol. 24, No. 4. (1 November 1984), pp. 276-276, https://doi.org/10.1021/ci00044a600

Abstract

I am accepting your invitation to comment on your editorial in the May issue of JCICS regarding the subject of scientists’ commercial stakes in programs that they write for scientific purposes. I feel strongly about this issue because I believe that the spirit of scientific investigation and the spirit of scientific cooperation are threatened by the behavior of some of our new entrepreneurs who desire to get rich quick. The question of vested interest can be resolved at the publication level, at ...

 

The greater good

  
Nature, Vol. 505, No. 7481. (2 January 2014), pp. 5-5, https://doi.org/10.1038/505005a

Abstract

Governments, funding agencies and universities must all do their bit to ensure that research is appropriately assessed and rewarded. ...

 

Expert Failure: Re-evaluating Research Assessment

  
PLoS Biol, Vol. 11, No. 10. (8 October 2013), e1001677, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001677

Abstract

It is unlikely that there is any single objective measure of merit, so research assessment therefore requires new multivariate metrics that reflect the context of research, regardless of discipline. ...

 

How journal rankings can suppress interdisciplinary research: A comparison between Innovation Studies and Business & Management

  
Research Policy, Vol. 41, No. 7. (September 2012), pp. 1262-1282, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2012.03.015

Abstract

This study provides quantitative evidence on how the use of journal rankings can disadvantage interdisciplinary research in research evaluations. Using publication and citation data, it compares the degree of interdisciplinarity and the research performance of a number of Innovation Studies units with that of leading Business & Management Schools (BMS) in the UK. On the basis of various mappings and metrics, this study shows that: (i) Innovation Studies units are consistently more interdisciplinary in their research than Business & Management Schools; ...

 

Risks and Rewards of an Interdisciplinary Research Path

  
Science, Vol. 306, No. 5704. (17 December 2004), pp. 2046-2046, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1103628

Abstract

This Policy Forum, based on the results of an 18-month study of five interdisciplinary research centers, provides data on the practices and processes of interdisciplinary collaboration. The authors used techniques of network and interview analysis. They find that, although many young scientists are drawn to the intellectual rewards of interdisciplinary research as graduate students, they may also be deterred by the professional risks as early-career tenure-track scientists. ...

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