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Selection: with tag primary-productivity [32 articles] 

 

Regulation of lake primary productivity by food web structure

  
Ecology, Vol. 68, No. 6. (December 1987), pp. 1863-1876, https://doi.org/10.2307/1939878

Abstract

We performed whole—lake manipulations of fish populations to test the hypothesis that higher trophic levels regulate zooplankton and phytoplankton community structure, biomass, and primary productivity. The study involved three lakes and spanned 2 yr. Results demonstrated hierarchical control of primary production by abiotic factors and a trophic cascade involving fish predation. In Paul Lake, the reference lake, productivity varied from year to year, illustrating the effects of climatic factors and the natural dynamics of unmanipulated food web interactions. In Tuesday Lake, ...

 

Scaling up the diversity-resilience relationship with trait databases and remote sensing data: the recovery of productivity after wildfire

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 22, No. 4. (April 2016), pp. 1421-1432, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13174

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms underlying ecosystem resilience – why some systems have an irreversible response to disturbances while others recover – is critical for conserving biodiversity and ecosystem function in the face of global change. Despite the widespread acceptance of a positive relationship between biodiversity and resilience, empirical evidence for this relationship remains fairly limited in scope and localized in scale. Assessing resilience at the large landscape and regional scales most relevant to land management and conservation practices has been limited by ...

 

Positive biodiversity-productivity relationship predominant in global forests

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6309. (14 October 2016), aaf8957, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf8957

Abstract

[Abstract] The biodiversity-productivity relationship (BPR) is foundational to our understanding of the global extinction crisis and its impacts on ecosystem functioning. Understanding BPR is critical for the accurate valuation and effective conservation of biodiversity. Using ground-sourced data from 777,126 permanent plots, spanning 44 countries and most terrestrial biomes, we reveal a globally consistent positive concave-down BPR, showing that continued biodiversity loss would result in an accelerating decline in forest productivity worldwide. The value of biodiversity in maintaining commercial forest productivity alone—US$166 billion ...

 

Addition of multiple limiting resources reduces grassland diversity

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7618. (24 August 2016), pp. 93-96, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature19324

Abstract

Niche dimensionality provides a general theoretical explanation for biodiversitymore niches, defined by more limiting factors, allow for more ways that species can coexist. Because plant species compete for the same set of limiting resources, theory predicts that addition of a limiting resource eliminates potential trade-offs, reducing the number of species that can coexist. Multiple nutrient limitation of plant production is common and therefore fertilization may reduce diversity by reducing the number or dimensionality of belowground limiting factors. At the same time, ...

 

Ecology: more is less

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7618. (31 August 2016), pp. 42-42, https://doi.org/10.1038/537042a

Abstract

[Excerpt] Plants compete for the same resources, such as nutrients, light and water. Because these resources are often limited, the coexistence of plant species requires the creation of trade-offs in resource use. In this issue, Harpole et al. report that increasing a limited nutrient in grassland can eliminate these potential trade-offs, reducing overall species diversity (W. S. Harpole et al. Nature 537, 93–96; 2016). [\n] The authors considered 45 grassland sites across 6 continents, and measured species diversity in response to various ...

 

Grassland species loss resulting from reduced niche dimension

  
Nature, Vol. 446, No. 7137. (25 March 2007), pp. 791-793, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05684

Abstract

Intact ecosystems contain large numbers of competing but coexisting species. Although numerous alternative theories have provided potential explanations for this high biodiversity, there have been few field experiments testing between these theories. In particular, theory predicts that higher diversity of coexisting competitors could result from greater niche dimensionality1, for example larger numbers of limiting resources or factors. Alternatively, diversity could be independent of niche dimensionality because large numbers of species can coexist when limited by just one or two factors if ...

 

Size asymmetry of resource competition and the structure of plant communities

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 104, No. 4. (July 2016), pp. 899-910, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12557

Abstract

Plant communities show two general responses to gradients of soil resources: a decrease in species richness at high levels of resource availability and an associated shift in species composition from small and slow-growing species to large and fast-growing species. Models attempting to explain these responses have usually focused on a single pattern and provided contradicting predictions concerning the underlying mechanisms. [\n] We use an extension of Tilman's resource competition model to investigate the hypothesis that both patterns may ...

 

Size asymmetry of resource competition and the structure of plant communities: commentary on DeMalach et al 2016

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 104, No. 4. (July 2016), pp. 911-912, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12591

Abstract

[Excerpt] The hump-back relationship between diversity and productivity is one of the well-known patterns in ecology that have defied unequivocal explanation (Mittelbach et al. 2001; Šímová, Li & Storch 2013). While it has often been argued that the decline of species richness under high productivity is due to more intense competition, it has never been made fully clear why extinction under high productivity should be more likely compared to low productivity. DeMalach et al. (2016) present a simple and elegant explanation: it ...

 

Effects of resource additions on species richness and ANPP in an alpine meadow community

  
Journal of Plant Ecology, Vol. 3, No. 1. (01 March 2010), pp. 25-31, https://doi.org/10.1093/jpe/rtp034

Abstract

[Aims] Theories based on resource additions indicate that plant species richness is mainly determined by the number of limiting resources. However, the individual effects of various limiting resources on species richness and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) are less well understood. Here, we analyzed potential linkages between additions of limiting resources, species loss and ANPP increase and further explored the underlying mechanisms. [Methods] Resources (N, P, K and water) were added in a completely randomized block design to alpine meadow plots in ...

 

Nutrient co-limitation of primary producer communities

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 14, No. 9. (September 2011), pp. 852-862, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01651.x

Abstract

Synergistic interactions between multiple limiting resources are common, highlighting the importance of co-limitation as a constraint on primary production. Our concept of resource limitation has shifted over the past two decades from an earlier paradigm of single-resource limitation towards concepts of co-limitation by multiple resources, which are predicted by various theories. Herein, we summarise multiple-resource limitation responses in plant communities using a dataset of 641 studies that applied factorial addition of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in freshwater, marine and terrestrial ...

 

Natural and anthropogenic drivers of calcium depletion in a northern forest during the last millennium

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 25. (21 June 2016), pp. 6934-6938, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1604909113

Abstract

[Significance] This research breaks new ground by showing that, contrary to generally accepted theories of ecosystem development, calcium depletion has been occurring for millennia as a natural consequence of long-term ecosystem development. This natural process predisposed forest ecosystems in the region to detrimental responses to acid rain in the 20th century. We also show that nitrogen availability was increasing concurrently with the depletion of calcium. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to reconstruct continuous changes in nutrient availability for a ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 28

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   power-law   ppm   practice   pre-alpine   pre-print   precaution   precaution-principle   precipitation   precisely-wrong   precursor-research   predation   predator-satiation   predatory-publishers   prediction   prediction-bias   predictive-modelling   predictors   predisposition   premature-optimization   preparedness   preprints   prescribed-burn   presence-absence   presence-only   pressure-volume-curves   pressures   prestoea-montana   pretreatment   prey-predator   pricing   primary-productivity   principal-components-regression   prisoners-dilemma   pristiphora-abietina   probability-vs-possibility   problem-driven   processes   processing   production-rules   productivity   programming   progressive-learning   prolog   proportion   prosopis-alba   prosopis-glandulosa   prosopis-pallida   protected-areas   protected-species   protection   protective-forest   protocol-uncertainty   provenance   provisioning-services   pruning   prunus-avium   prunus-cerasifera   prunus-domestica   prunus-dulcis   prunus-fruticosa   prunus-ilicifolia   prunus-laurocerasus   prunus-mahaleb   prunus-malaheb   prunus-padus   prunus-salicina   prunus-serotina   prunus-spinosa   prunus-spp   prunus-tenella   pseudo-absences   pseudo-random   pseudoaraucaria-spp   pseudolarix-spp   pseudomonas-avellanae   pseudomonas-spp   pseudomonas-syringae   pseudotsuga   pseudotsuga-macrocarpa   pseudotsuga-menziesii   pseudotsuga-spp   psychology   pterocarpus-indicus   pterocarpus-officinalis   pterocarya-pterocarpa   public-domain   publication-bias   publication-delay   publication-errors   publish-or-perish   puccinia-coronata   pull-push-pest-control   pulp   punica-granatum   purdiaea-nutans   pyrenees-region   pyrolysis   pyrus-amygdaliformis   pyrus-browiczii  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Drought-induced reduction in global terrestrial net primary production from 2000 through 2009

  
Science, Vol. 329, No. 5994. (2010), pp. 940-943, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1192666

Abstract

Terrestrial net primary production (NPP) quantifies the amount of atmospheric carbon fixed by plants and accumulated as biomass. Previous studies have shown that climate constraints were relaxing with increasing temperature and solar radiation, allowing an upward trend in NPP from 1982 through 1999. The past decade (2000 to 2009) has been the warmest since instrumental measurements began, which could imply continued increases in NPP; however, our estimates suggest a reduction in the global NPP of 0.55 petagrams of carbon. Large-scale droughts ...

 

Biomass and primary productivity of an Alnus viridis stand - a case study from the Schächental valley, Switzerland

  
Botanica Helvetica In Botanica Helvetica, Vol. 116, No. 1. (23 June 2006), pp. 55-64, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00035-006-0758-7

Abstract

Abstract.  Wiedmer E. and Senn-Irlet B. 2006. Biomass and primary productivity of an Alnus viridis stand – a case study from the Schchental valley, Switzerland. Bot. Helv. 116: 55–64. Green alder (Alnus viridis) stands are spreading rapidly in the subalpine belt of the Swiss Alps. To understand this rapid colonisation, estimates of above ground biomass and net primary productivity were made in an old-growth pure stand of Alnus viridis in central Switzerland. A total above-ground biomass of 89.3 t ha−1 was recorded, to which ...

 

Developing a spatially-explicit pan-European dataset of forest biomass increment

  
In 22nd European Biomass Conference and Exhibition (2014), pp. 41-46, https://doi.org/10.5071/22ndEUBCE2014-1AO.8.1

Abstract

Among the services provided by forest ecosystems, biomass is one of the most important. Nevertheless, spatially explicit data on forest biomass increment is rarely available for large regions. Thus the aim of this study is to develop a methodology for the spatial assessment of forest biomass increment at the panEuropean level. To address this aim, we used MODIS GPP data (NASA Product MOD17A3) adjusted with GPP data derived from upscaling FLUXNET observations using the Model Tree Ensemble (MTE) technique (Jung et ...

 

Modeling potential distribution and carbon dynamics of natural terrestrial ecosystems: a case study of Turkey

  
Sensors, Vol. 7, No. 10. (11 October 2007), pp. 2273-2296, https://doi.org/10.3390/s7102273

Abstract

We derived a simple model that relates the classification of biogeoclimatezones, (co)existence and fractional coverage of plant functional types (PFTs), and patternsof ecosystem carbon (C) stocks to long-term average values of biogeoclimatic indices in atime- and space-varying fashion from climate–vegetation equilibrium models. ProposedDynamic Ecosystem Classification and Productivity (DECP) model is based on the spatialinterpolation of annual biogeoclimatic variables through multiple linear regression (MLR)models and inverse distance weighting (IDW) and was applied to the entire Turkey of780,595 km2 on a 500 m ...

 

Global potential net primary production predicted from vegetation class, precipitation, and temperature

  
Ecology, Vol. 89, No. 8. (August 2008), pp. 2117-2126, https://doi.org/10.1890/07-0850.1

Abstract

Net primary production (NPP), the difference between CO2 fixed by photosynthesis and CO2 lost to autotrophic respiration, is one of the most important components of the carbon cycle. Our goal was to develop a simple regression model to estimate global NPP using climate and land cover data. Approximately 5600 global data points with observed mean annual NPP, land cover class, precipitation, and temperature were compiled. Precipitation was better correlated with NPP than temperature, and it explained much more of the variability ...

 

Climate change impacts in European forests: the expert views of local observers

  
Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 71, No. 2. (2014), pp. 131-137, https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-013-0280-1

Abstract

[Excerpt] Forests respond differently to changes in climate depending on individual site characteristics and tree status. Site conditions may buffer or boost impacts of heat, drought, and storm events. Considering contemporary changes in climate (Christensen et al. 2007), warming may increase forest productivity in those parts of Europe where growth resources like soil water are not limiting (Nabuurs et al. 2002). However, under conditions of limited resource supply and changed disturbance regime, we may expect a reduction of forest productivity and ...

 

Steeper declines in forest photosynthesis than respiration explain age-driven decreases in forest growth

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 24. (17 June 2014), pp. 8856-8860, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1320761111

Abstract

[Significance] Advancing our understanding of how and why forests dynamically change in their productivity is important to predict the future change. The traditional view of forest dynamics originated by Kira, Shidei, and Odum suggests a decline in net primary productivity [or gross primary productivity (GPP) − autotrophic respiration (Ra)] in aging forests due to stabilized GPP and continuously increased Ra. We found that, in contrast to the traditional view, both GPP and Ra decline in aging forests while GPP decreases more ...

 

Evidence for soil water control on carbon and water dynamics in European forests during the extremely dry year: 2003

  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, Vol. 143, No. 1-2. (16 March 2007), pp. 123-145, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2006.12.004

Abstract

The drought of 2003 was exceptionally severe in many regions of Europe, both in duration and in intensity. In some areas, especially in Germany and France, it was the strongest drought for the last 50 years, lasting for more than 6 months. We used continuous carbon and water flux measurements at 12 European monitoring sites covering various forest ecosystem types and a large climatic range in order to characterise the consequences of this drought on ecosystems functioning. As soil water content ...

 

Modeling biomass burning and related carbon emissions during the 21st century in Europe

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 118, No. 4. (December 2013), pp. 1732-1747, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013jg002444

Abstract

In this study we present an assessment of the impact of future climate change on total fire probability, burned area, and carbon (C) emissions from fires in Europe. The analysis was performed with the Community Land Model (CLM) extended with a prognostic treatment of fires that was specifically refined and optimized for application over Europe. Simulations over the 21st century are forced by five different high-resolution Regional Climate Models under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B. Both original and bias-corrected ...

 

Modelling regional climate change effects on potential natural ecosystems in Sweden

  
Climatic Change In Climatic Change, Vol. 78, No. 2-4. (October 2006), pp. 381-406, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-005-9030-1

Abstract

This study aims to demonstrate the potential of a process-based regional ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS, driven by climate scenarios generated by a regional climate model system (RCM) to generate predictions useful for assessing effects of climatic and CO2 change on the key ecosystem services of carbon uptake and storage. Scenarios compatible with the A2 and B2 greenhouse gas emission scenarios of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) and with boundary conditions from two general circulation models (GCMs) – HadAM3H and ECHAM4/OPYC3 ...

 

Net primary productivity of forest stands in New Hampshire estimated from Landsat and MODIS satellite data

  
Carbon balance and management, Vol. 2 (2007), https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-0680-2-9

Abstract

A simulation model that relies on satellite observations of vegetation cover from the Landsat 7 sensor and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate net primary productivity (NPP) of forest stands at the Bartlett Experiment Forest (BEF) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Net primary production (NPP) predicted from the NASA-CASA model using 30-meter resolution Landsat inputs showed variations related to ...

 

Improved estimates of net primary productivity from modis satellite data at regional and local scales

  
Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America, Vol. 16, No. 1. (February 2006), pp. 125-132, https://doi.org/10.1890/05-0247

Abstract

We compared estimates of net primary production (NPP) from the MODIS satellite with estimates from a forest ecosystem process model (PnET-CN) and forest inventory and analysis (FIA) data for forest types of the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The regional means were similar for the three methods and for the dominant oak-hickory forests in the region. However, MODIS underestimated NPP for less-dominant northern hardwood forests and overestimated NPP for coniferous forests. Causes of inaccurate estimates of NPP by MODIS were ...

 

Reconciling satellite with ground data to estimate forest productivity at national scales

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 276 (July 2012), pp. 196-208, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2012.03.022

Abstract

Large scale forest productivity estimates are of increasing interest as more demands are made on forest resources. In principle three different methods are currently available: (i) forest growth data from forest research plots and/or forest inventory sampling points based on repeated tree observations, (ii) flux tower observations which record the gas exchange of the plant atmosphere interactions for a given vegetation type, and (iii) remotely sensed data for a continuous cover of net primary productivity estimates. In this paper we focus ...

 

Comparison of modeling approaches for carbon partitioning: Impact on estimates of global net primary production and equilibrium biomass of woody vegetation from MODIS GPP

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 115, No. G4. (1 December 2010), pp. G04025-G04025, https://doi.org/10.1029/2010jg001326

Abstract

Partitioning of gross primary production (GPP) to aboveground versus belowground, to growth versus respiration, and to short versus long-lived tissues exerts a strong influence on ecosystem structure and function, with potentially large implications for the global carbon budget. A recent meta-analysis of forest ecosystems suggests that carbon partitioning to leaves, stems, and roots varies consistently with GPP and that the ratio of net primary production (NPP) to GPP is conservative across environmental gradients. To examine influences of carbon partitioning schemes employed ...

 

A global forest growing stock, biomass and carbon map based on FAO statistics

  
Silva Fennica, Vol. 42, No. 3. (2008), pp. 387-396

Abstract

Currently, information on forest biomass is available from a mixture of sources, including in-situ measurements, national forest inventories, administrative-level statistics, model outputs and regional satellite products. These data tend to be regional or national, based on different methodologies and not easily accessible. One of the few maps available is the Global Forest Resources Assessment (FRA) produced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO 2005) which contains aggregated country-level information about the growing stock, biomass and carbon stock ...

 

Reduction of primary production and changing of nutrient ratio in the East China Sea: Effect of the Three Gorges Dam?

  
Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 33, No. 7. (15 April 2006), L07610, https://doi.org/10.1029/2006gl025800

Abstract

It has been documented that the global proliferation of dam construction on the major river has reduced nutrient and sediment loading to coastal environments. As a consequence, dams can impact marine ecological systems by changing nutrient concentrations and ratios in the coastal zone. From 1998–2004, we conducted a high resolution oceanographic investigation of the East China Sea (ECS) before and after the first filling phase (June 2003) of the Three-Gorges Dam (TGD). We found that the Si:N ratio in the River ...

 

Impacts of climate change on primary production and carbon sequestration of boreal Norway spruce forests: Finland as a model

  
Climatic Change (12 October 2012), pp. 1-15, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-012-0607-1

Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the potential impacts of climate change on the spatial patterns of primary production and net carbon sequestration in relation to water availability in Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) dominated forests throughout Finland (N 60°–N 70°). The Finnish climatic scenarios (FINADAPT) based on the A2 emission scenario were used. According to the results, the changing climate increases the ratio of evapotranspiration to precipitation in southern Finland, while it slightly decreases the ratio in ...

 

Carbon accumulation in European forests

  
Nature Geoscience, Vol. 1, No. 7. (22 June 2008), pp. 425-429, https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo233

Abstract

European forests are intensively exploited for wood products, yet they also form a sink for carbon. European forest inventories, available for the past 50 years, can be combined with timber harvest statistics to assess changes in this carbon sink. Analysis of these data sets between 1950 and 2000 from the EU-15 countries excluding Luxembourg, plus Norway and Switzerland, reveals that there is a tight relationship between increases in forest biomass and forest ecosystem productivity but timber harvests grew more slowly. Encouragingly, ...

 

Impacts of climate change on natural forest productivity – evidence since the middle of the 20th century

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 12, No. 5. (May 2006), pp. 862-882, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2006.01134.x

Abstract

Changes to forest production drivers (light, water, temperature, and site nutrient) over the last 55 years have been documented in peer-reviewed literature. The main objective of this paper is to review documented evidence of the impacts of climate change trends on forest productivity since the middle of the 20th century. We first present a concise overview of the climate controls of forest production, provide evidence of how the main controls have changed in the last 55 years, followed by a core ...

 

Europe-wide reduction in primary productivity caused by the heat and drought in 2003

  
Nature, Vol. 437, No. 7058. (22 September 2005), pp. 529-533, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03972

Abstract

Future climate warming is expected to enhance plant growth in temperate ecosystems and to increase carbon sequestration1, 2. But although severe regional heatwaves may become more frequent in a changing climate3, 4, their impact on terrestrial carbon cycling is unclear. Here we report measurements of ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes, remotely sensed radiation absorbed by plants, and country-level crop yields taken during the European heatwave in 2003. We use a terrestrial biosphere simulation model5 to assess continental-scale changes in primary productivity during ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/primary-productivity

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.