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Selection: with tag postfire-recovery [30 articles] 

 

History matters: previous land use changes determine post-fire vegetation recovery in forested Mediterranean landscapes

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 279 (September 2012), pp. 121-127, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2012.05.020

Abstract

[Abstract] Land use changes and shifts in disturbance regimes (e.g. wildfires) are recognized worldwide as two of the major drivers of the current global change in terrestrial ecosystems. We expect that, in areas with large-scale land use changes, legacies from previous land uses persist and affect current ecosystem responses to climate-associated disturbances like fire. This study analyses whether post-fire vegetation dynamics may differ according to specific historical land use histories in a Mediterranean forest landscape of about 60,000 ha that was burnt ...

 

Shifts in community-level traits and functional diversity in a mixed conifer forest: a legacy of land-use change

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 53, No. 6. (December 2016), pp. 1755-1765, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12737

Abstract

[Summary] [::1] Historical reference conditions have long been used to guide the restoration of degraded ecosystems. However, a rapidly changing climate and altered disturbance regimes are calling into question the usefulness of this approach. As a consequence, restoration goals are increasingly focused on creating communities that are resilient to novel environmental stressors and emphasis is being placed on defining functional targets through the use of plant traits. While changes in forest structure and composition have received much attention, long-term changes in stand-level ...

 

Post-fire salvage logging alters species composition and reduces cover, richness, and diversity in Mediterranean plant communities

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 133 (January 2014), pp. 323-331, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2013.12.014

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We tested the effects of post-fire salvage logging on plant communities. [::] Logging reduced plant species richness, diversity, and cover. [::] Species composition in salvaged sites resembled early-successional habitats. [::] Unsalvaged sites yielded greater tree regeneration. [Abstract] An intense debate exists on the effects of post-fire salvage logging on plant community regeneration, but scant data are available derived from experimental studies. We analyzed the effects of salvage logging on plant community regeneration in terms of species richness, diversity, cover, and composition by experimentally managing a ...

 

Scaling up the diversity-resilience relationship with trait databases and remote sensing data: the recovery of productivity after wildfire

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 22, No. 4. (April 2016), pp. 1421-1432, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13174

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms underlying ecosystem resilience – why some systems have an irreversible response to disturbances while others recover – is critical for conserving biodiversity and ecosystem function in the face of global change. Despite the widespread acceptance of a positive relationship between biodiversity and resilience, empirical evidence for this relationship remains fairly limited in scope and localized in scale. Assessing resilience at the large landscape and regional scales most relevant to land management and conservation practices has been limited by ...

 

Investigation of root reinforcement decay after a forest fire in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) protection forest

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 400 (September 2017), pp. 339-352, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2017.06.005

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Engineering resilience of Scots pine 4 years after forest fire has been quantified. [::] Spatial distribution of root reinforcement (RR) has been modeled. [::] RR decay by a factor of 3.6, 4 years after a stand replacing forest fire. [::] Natural regeneration has almost no root reinforcement 4 years after fire. [::] Decay of root mechanical properties determine most of RR loss. [Abstract] Natural disturbances may cause a temporary reduction or elimination of the protective effect of forests. The management of protection forests aims to influence ...

 

Post-fire spread of alien plant species in a mixed broad-leaved forest of the Insubric region

  
Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants, Vol. 207, No. 1. (January 2012), pp. 19-29, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.flora.2011.07.016

Abstract

How do tree species regenerate and which ecological conditions are required after forest fire in the Insubric region of the Alps? Are indigenous stand-forming tree species resistant over the invasion of alien plant species after such a disturbance? We addressed these questions in a case study in the Swiss canton of Ticino. In April 2006, a surface fire with severe intensity burnt a forest area of 55 ha on a south-facing slope (400–800 m.a.s.l.). The dominant trees in the investigated area ...

 

A comparative study of aboveground biomass of three Mediterranean species in a post-fire succession

  
Acta Oecologica, Vol. 25, No. 1-2. (March 2004), pp. 1-6, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actao.2003.10.002

Abstract

The aboveground biomass of three woody species (Cistus albidus, Quercus coccifera and Pinus halepensis) in two early successional stages (3- and 10-year old) of a post-fire Mediterranean ecosystem was investigated. Among these three species, which belong to the successional series of holm oak (Quercus ilex), C. albidus and Q. coccifera are two dominant shrub species in the garrigue ecosystem and P. halepensis is a pioneer tree species widely represented in the Mediterranean area. The results obtained showed that in monospecific stands, ...

 

Resprouting as a key functional trait: how buds, protection and resources drive persistence after fire

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 197, No. 1. (January 2013), pp. 19-35, https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.12001

Abstract

[Summary] Resprouting as a response to disturbance is now widely recognized as a key functional trait among woody plants and as the basis for the persistence niche. However, the underlying mechanisms that define resprouting responses to disturbance are poorly conceptualized. Resprouting ability is constrained by the interaction of the disturbance regime that depletes the buds and resources needed to fund resprouting, and the environment that drives growth and resource allocation. We develop a buds-protection-resources (BPR) framework for understanding resprouting in fire-prone ...

 

Resistance and resilience to changing climate and fire regime depend on plant functional traits

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 102, No. 6. (November 2014), pp. 1572-1581, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12306

Abstract

[Summary] [::] Changing disturbance–climate interactions will drive shifts in plant communities: these effects are not adequately quantified by environmental niche models used to predict future species distributions. We quantified the effects of more frequent fire and lower rainfall – as projected to occur under a warming and drying climate – on population responses of shrub species in biodiverse Mediterranean-climate type shrublands near Eneabba, southwestern Australia. [::] Using experimental fires, we measured the density of all shrub species for four dominant plant functional groups ...

 

Fire effects on soils: the human dimension

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (05 June 2016), 20150171, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0171

Abstract

Soils are among the most valuable non-renewable resources on the Earth. They support natural vegetation and human agro-ecosystems, represent the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock, and act as stores and filters for water. Mankind has impacted on soils from its early days in many different ways, with burning being the first human perturbation at landscape scales. Fire has long been used as a tool to fertilize soils and control plant growth, but it can also substantially change vegetation, enhance soil erosion ...

 

Factors determining low Mediterranean ecosystems resilience to fire: the case of Pinus halepensis forests

  
In Ecology, Conservation and Management of Mediterranean Climate Ecosystems - Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Mediterranean Climate Ecosystems (2004), 20

Abstract

Factors acting as drivers of low resilience to fire in Pinus halepensis ecosystems are being examined. The commonest factor seems to be fire interval. From the several time windows examined, that of, the shortest one ever reported in this type of communities (3 years only) seemed to be the most crucial. From the plant species previously existing on the site woody and herbaceous obligate seeders are mainly affected by this factor. Other factors, affecting mainly pine regeneration, are the abundance of Quercus coccifera individuals in the ...

 

Vegetation response to a short interval between high-severity wildfires in a mixed-evergreen forest

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 97, No. 1. (January 2009), pp. 142-154, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2008.01456.x

Abstract

[::] Variations in disturbance regime strongly influence ecosystem structure and function. A prominent form of such variation is when multiple high-severity wildfires occur in rapid succession (i.e. short-interval (SI) severe fires, or ‘re-burns’). These events have been proposed as key mechanisms altering successional rates and pathways. [::] We utilized a natural experiment afforded by two overlapping wildfires occurring within a 15-year interval in forests of the Klamath–Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon (USA). We tested for unique effects of a SI fire (15-year interval before ...

 

Human-caused climate change is now a key driver of forest fire activity in the western United States

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201612926, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1612926113

Abstract

[Excerpt] Effects of climate warming on natural and human systems are becoming increasingly visible across the globe. For example, the shattering of past yearly records for global high temperatures seems to be a near-annual event, with the five hottest years since 1880 all occurring since 2005. Not coincidentally, the single hottest year on record, 2015, also broke records for area burned by wildfire in the United States [...], eclipsing the previous high mark set just one decade prior. Scientists have known ...

 

Wildland fire as a self-regulating mechanism: the role of previous burns and weather in limiting fire progression

  
Ecological Applications, Vol. 25, No. 6. (September 2015), pp. 1478-1492, https://doi.org/10.1890/14-1430.1

Abstract

Theory suggests that natural fire regimes can result in landscapes that are both self-regulating and resilient to fire. For example, because fires consume fuel, they may create barriers to the spread of future fires, thereby regulating fire size. Top-down controls such as weather, however, can weaken this effect. While empirical examples demonstrating this pattern–process feedback between vegetation and fire exist, they have been geographically limited or did not consider the influence of time between fires and weather. The availability of remotely ...

 

Increased wind erosion from forest wildfire: implications for contaminant-related risks

  
Journal of Environment Quality, Vol. 35, No. 2. (2 February 2006), pp. 468-478, https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2005.0112

Abstract

Assessments of contaminant-related human and ecological risk require estimation of transport rates, but few data exist on wind-driven transport rates in nonagricultural systems, particularly in response to ecosystem disturbances such as forest wildfire and also relative to water-driven transport. The Cerro Grande wildfire in May of 2000 burned across ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P.&C. Lawson var. scopulorum Englem.) forest within Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico, where contaminant transport and associated post-fire inhalation risks are of concern. ...

 

Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of species diversity in a Mediterranean ecosystem following fire

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 7, No. 4. (1997), 307, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf9970307

Abstract

This study examines species richness, species diversity (H'-Shannon-Weiner Index) and species dominance (C- Simpson-Index) in a Mediterranean ecosystem as a function of time elapsed since fire and the extent to which micro-climate regulates these indexes after wildfire occurrence. The study was conducted in an eastern Mediterranean ecosystem (Israel) over three consecutive years. About 400 ha of a mixed oak - pine forest burned in the summer of 1983 and part of it also suffered from a repeat fire in the summer ...

 

Vegetation cover and species richness after recurrent forest fires in the Eastern Mediterranean ecosystem of Mount Carmel, Israel

  
Science of The Total Environment (February 2016), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.02.113

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Vegetation cover changes after recurrent fires, and serve as a good indicator of fire influence. [::] In most fire-damaged areas dominant cover was composed from shrubs and dwarf-shrubs. [::] Tree cover was severely damaged after recurrent fires, and showed drastic decrease. [::] Species richness increased mainly in the first decade after the recurrent fires, and decreased when the forest canopy began to close. [::] Fire recurrence with short intervals (4–6 years) may lower the rehabilitated processes of the ecosystem and change its equilibrium. [Abstract] Fire is ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 27

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   plant-populations   plant-self-defense   plant-species   plant-species-competition   plant-species-richness   plant-survival   plant-trait   plant-use   plantation   plants   plasticity   platanus-orientalis   platanus-racemosa   platanus-spp   platanus-x-hispanica   platycarya-strobilacea   platymiscium-pinnatum   platypus-sulcatus   plausibility-check   pleurostomophora-richardsiae   pliocene   plumeria-alba   plumeria-rubra   po-plain   poaceae   podocarpus-falcatus   poisonous-plants   poland   polar-ecological-zone   polfc   policy   policy-strategies-for-scientific-uncertainty   pollen   pollen-analysis   pollen-dispersal   pollen-records   pollination   pollinology   pollution   polulation   polydrusus-impressifrons   polygala-myrtifolia   polygraphus-poligraphus   polymath   polymorphism   polypodium   population   population-adaptation   population-decline   population-dynamics   population-growth   population-structuring   population-viability-risk-management   populus-adenopoda   populus-alba   populus-angustifolia   populus-balsamifera   populus-cathayana   populus-deltoides   populus-euphratica   populus-fremontii   populus-grandidentata   populus-ilicifolia   populus-koreana   populus-lasiocarpa   populus-nigra   populus-simonii   populus-spp   populus-szechuanica   populus-tremula   populus-tremuloides   populus-trichocarpa   populus-wettsteinii   populus-x-canescens   populus-x-tomentosa   populus-yunnanensis   porosity   portability   porthetria-dispar   portugal   positional-analysis   post-fire-management   post-fire-regeneration   post-fire-vegetation-dynamics   post-glacial-dispersal   post-glacial-migration   post-normal-science   post-publication-peer-review   postfire-impacts   postfire-recovery   postgis   postglacial-recolonization   postgresql   potential   potential-evapotranspiration   potential-habitat   potential-soil-erosion   potoxylon-melagangai   poverty  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Direct regeneration is not the only response of Mediterranean forests to large fires

  
Ecology, Vol. 85, No. 3. (March 2004), pp. 716-729, https://doi.org/10.1890/02-0492

Abstract

It is widely accepted that the postfire recovery in Mediterranean plant communities is carried out by direct regeneration, i.e., the fast recovery of a plant community with the same species pool that it had immediately prior to disturbance. However, there is evidence that not all plant species in the Mediterranean basin survive fire in all situations, suggesting that the direct regeneration process might not apply to all situations. We analyze whether the main combinations of forest tree species (up to 16) ...

 

Resprouting of Quercus suber in NE Spain after fire

  
Journal of Vegetation Science, Vol. 8, No. 5. (October 1997), pp. 703-706, https://doi.org/10.2307/3237375

Abstract

Many Mediterranean species have evolved strategies that allow them to survive periodic wildfires. Quercus suber trees resprout after fire, some from stem buds and others from basal buds only. In the former case the canopy recovers quickly. In the latter case the stem dies but the tree survives and regrows from basal sprouts. The probability of stem death and the degree of height recovery were studied after a fire in a Q. suber forest in NE Spain using logistic regression analysis. ...

 

Fire resistance of European pines

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 256, No. 3. (July 2008), pp. 246-255, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2008.04.032

Abstract

Pine resistance to low- to moderate-intensity fire arises from traits (namely related to tissue insulation from heat) that enable tree survival. Predictive models of the likelihood of tree mortality after fire are quite valuable to assist decision-making after wildfire and to plan prescribed burning. Data and models pertaining to the survival of European pines following fire are reviewed. The type and quality of the current information on fire resistance of the various European species is quite variable. Data from low-intensity fire ...

 

Climatic trends, disturbances and short-term vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean shrubland

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 147, No. 1. (June 2001), pp. 25-37, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00438-2

Abstract

Fire and erosion are two major disturbances affecting Mediterranean ecosystems. Both of them are closely related to climate. There is evidence of decreasing precipitation in the Mediterranean, particularly during summer. There are also indications of an increased variability in the rainfall distribution. Climatic changes, though show high heterogeneity at a local scale. Based on these observations, we have evaluated the following hypotheses for the Region of Valencia (East Spain). [::1] During the past three decades, climatic conditions have become more favourable ...

 

Post-Fire Management of Non-Serotinous Pine Forests

  
In Post-Fire Management and Restoration of Southern European Forests, Vol. 24 (2012), pp. 151-170, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2208-8_7

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the post-fire management of non serotinous pine forests. These pine species do not regenerate after fire and depend on the arrival of seeds from the unburned vegetation to recover after wildfires. The chapter starts with an overview of the ecological context of these forests, from their distribution, vegetation composition and importance to their response after fire. Then it introduces the main issues and alternatives of post-fire management, and concludes with two case studies, one in the western and ...

 

Resprouting of Quercus suber in NE Spain after fire

  
Journal of Vegetation Science, Vol. 8, No. 5. (1997), pp. 703-706, https://doi.org/10.2307/3237375

Abstract

Abstract. Many Mediterranean species have evolved strategies that allow them to survive periodic wildfires. Quercus suber trees resprout after fire, some from stem buds and others from basal buds only. In the former case the canopy recovers quickly. In the latter case the stem dies but the tree survives and regrows from basal sprouts. The probability of stem death and the degree of height recovery were studied after a fire in a Q. suber forest in NE Spain using logistic regression ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 13

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: extrapolation-error   extreme-events   extreme-weather   f-script   fabaceae   factor-analysis   fagus-crenata   fagus-engleriana   fagus-grandifolia   fagus-hayatae   fagus-japonica   fagus-longipetiolata   fagus-lucida   fagus-mexicana   fagus-moesiaca   fagus-multinervis   fagus-orientalis   fagus-silvatica   fagus-spp   fagus-sylvatica   fagus-taurica   faidherbia-albida   fallopia-spp   false-observations-propagation   false-positive   family-heritability   fao-ecozones   faostat   fapar   feather-moss   featured-publication   feedback   feedforward-networks   fennoscandia   fertile-islands   fertilization   ficus-altissima   ficus-aurea   ficus-benghalensis   ficus-carica   ficus-citrifolia   ficus-elastica   ficus-macrophylla   ficus-religiosa   field-measurements   filbert   financial-modelling   fine-roots   finland   fir-decline   fire   fire-ecology   fire-emissions   fire-fuel   fire-regimes   fire-season   fire-severity   fise   fish-resources   fitness   fitzroya-cupressoides   flagship-species   flammability   flash-flood   fleshy-fruit   flood-control   flood-frequency   flood-tolerance   flooding-tolerance   floodplain   floodplain-forest   floods   flora   floss   flow-accumulation   flowering-period   flowering-phenology   fluvial   fodder-tree   foliage   food-plant   food-security   food-web   forecast   forest-bioeconomy   forest-biomass   forest-classification   forest-communities   forest-conservation   forest-conversion   forest-damage   forest-degradation   forest-disturbance   forest-dynamics   forest-ecology   forest-ecosystem   forest-ecosystems   forest-edges   inrmm-list-of-tags   postfire-recovery  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

The Role of Black Locust (Robinia Pseudo-Acacia) in Forest Succession

  
The Journal of Ecology, Vol. 72, No. 3. (November 1984), pp. 749-766, https://doi.org/10.2307/2259529

Abstract

(1) Early forest regeneration in southern Appalachian hardwood forests is dominated by the woody nitrogen-fixing legume, black locust (Robinia pseudo-acacia). Although it grows most prevalently on clear-felled areas, abandoned pastures, or disturbed roadsides, it may have historically been an important colonizer of burned sites. Although it commonly reproduces from seed germination, sprouting from stumps and roots is its most prevalent means of regeneration. Early sprout growth is rapid, attaining heights up to 8 m in 3 years. (2) Except for stands ...

 

Managing forests and fire in changing climates

  
Science, Vol. 342, No. 6154. (04 October 2013), pp. 41-42, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1240294

Abstract

With projected climate change, we expect to face much more forest fire in the coming decades. Policy-makers are challenged not to categorize all fires as destructive to ecosystems simply because they have long flame lengths and kill most of the trees within the fire boundary. Ecological context matters: In some ecosystems, high-severity regimes are appropriate, but climate change may modify these fire regimes and ecosystems as well. Some undesirable impacts may be avoided or reduced through global strategies, as well as ...

 

Abiotic Stressors – Fire Hazard

  
In Management Strategies to Adapt Alpine Space Forests to Climate Change Risks (28 August 2013), https://doi.org/10.5772/56273
edited by Gillian Cerbu

Abstract

Introduction. Forest fires are worldwide recognized as one of the main factors affecting the forest ecosystem equilibrium, leading to direct and indirect impacts on the functions provided by forests (production, protection, wildlife, tourism, etc..). Forest fire ignition and propagation are closely linked to site-specific conditions: fuel characteristics, forest structure and composition, weather and topography. Within the MANFRED project, ERSAF was aimed to identifying potential evolution scenarios of forest fires danger due to climate change in the Alpine Space. ...

 

Post-wildfire soil erosion in the Mediterranean: review and future research directions

  
Earth-Science Reviews, Vol. 105, No. 3-4. (20 April 2011), pp. 71-100, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2011.01.001

Abstract

Wildfires increased dramatically in frequency and extent in the European Mediterranean region from the 1960s, aided by a general warming and drying trend, but driven primarily by socio-economic changes, including rural depopulation, land abandonment and afforestation with flammable species. Published research into post-wildfire hydrology and soil erosion, beginning during the 1980s in Spain, has been followed by studies in other European Mediterranean countries together with Israel and has now attained a sufficiently large critical mass to warrant a major review. Although ...

 

Aleppo Pine (Pinus Halepensis) Postfire Regeneration: the Role of Canopy and Soil Seed Banks

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 6, No. 2. (1996), 59, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf9960059

Abstract

Pinus halepensis (Aleppo pine), is the dominant tree of a large fraction (26%) of the Greek coniferous forests; this species is an endemic pine of the Mediterranean Rim and well adapted to fire. Its regeneration is accomplished exclusively through seeds, thus its soil and canopy seed banks are of paramount importance for postfire resilience. Cone opening and seed dispersal were investigated in unburned forests of Attica (Greece) and it was found that Pinus halepensis trees maintain a significant percentage of the ...

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Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/postfire-recovery

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.