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Selection: with tag postfire-impacts [24 articles] 

 

Resistance and resilience to changing climate and fire regime depend on plant functional traits

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 102, No. 6. (November 2014), pp. 1572-1581, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12306

Abstract

[Summary] [::] Changing disturbance–climate interactions will drive shifts in plant communities: these effects are not adequately quantified by environmental niche models used to predict future species distributions. We quantified the effects of more frequent fire and lower rainfall – as projected to occur under a warming and drying climate – on population responses of shrub species in biodiverse Mediterranean-climate type shrublands near Eneabba, southwestern Australia. [::] Using experimental fires, we measured the density of all shrub species for four dominant plant functional groups ...

 

Modelling the effect of soil burn severity on soil erosion at hillslope scale in the first year following wildfire in NW Spain

  
Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Vol. 41, No. 7. (15 June 2016), pp. 928-935, https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.3876

Abstract

Fire severity is recognized as a key factor in explaining post-fire soil erosion. However, the relationship between soil burn severity and soil loss has not been fully established until now. Sediment availability may also affect the extent of post-fire soil erosion. The objective of this study was to determine whether soil burn severity, estimated by an operational classification system based on visual indicators, can significantly explain soil loss in the first year after wildfire in shrubland and other areas affected by ...

 

Modelling post-fire soil erosion hazard using ordinal logistic regression: a case study in South-eastern Spain

  
Geomorphology, Vol. 232 (March 2015), pp. 117-124, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2014.12.005

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] A method to identify most vulnerable areas towards soil erosion has been proposed. [::] Slope steepness, aspect and fire severity were the inputs. [::] The field data were successfully fit to the model in 60% of cases after 50 runs. [::] North-facing slopes were shown to be less prone to soil erosion than the rest. [Abstract] Treatments that minimize soil erosion after large wildfires depend, among other factors, on fire severity and landscape configuration so that, in practice, most of them are applied according to ...

 

Risk of post-fire metal mobilization into surface water resources: a review

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 599-600 (December 2017), pp. 1740-1755, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.096

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Forest catchment supply high quality water to a number of communities around the world. [::] Forest fire release sequestered metals from soil organic matter and vegetation. [::] Post-fire erosion rapidly transports these metals to downstream soil and water bodies. [::] Their deposition in the water bodies affects the water quality and aquatic biota. [::] This metal contamination may reach to human being as a consumer. [Abstract] One of the significant economic benefits to communities around the world of having pristine forest catchments is the supply of ...

 

Evaluating post-fire forest resilience using GIS and multi-criteria analysis: an example from Cape Sounion National Park, Greece

  
Environmental Management In Environmental Management, Vol. 47, No. 3. (4 February 2011), pp. 384-397, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00267-011-9614-7

Abstract

Forest fires are one of the major causes of ecological disturbance in the mediterranean climate ecosystems of the world. Despite the fact that a lot of resources have been invested in fire prevention and suppression, the number of fires occurring in the Mediterranean Basin in the recent decades has continued to markedly increase. The understanding of the relationship between landscape and fire lies, among others, in the identification of the system’s post-fire resilience. In our study, ecological and landscape data are ...

 

Fire effects on soils: the human dimension

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (05 June 2016), 20150171, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0171

Abstract

Soils are among the most valuable non-renewable resources on the Earth. They support natural vegetation and human agro-ecosystems, represent the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock, and act as stores and filters for water. Mankind has impacted on soils from its early days in many different ways, with burning being the first human perturbation at landscape scales. Fire has long been used as a tool to fertilize soils and control plant growth, but it can also substantially change vegetation, enhance soil erosion ...

 

Factors determining low Mediterranean ecosystems resilience to fire: the case of Pinus halepensis forests

  
In Ecology, Conservation and Management of Mediterranean Climate Ecosystems - Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Mediterranean Climate Ecosystems (2004), 20

Abstract

Factors acting as drivers of low resilience to fire in Pinus halepensis ecosystems are being examined. The commonest factor seems to be fire interval. From the several time windows examined, that of, the shortest one ever reported in this type of communities (3 years only) seemed to be the most crucial. From the plant species previously existing on the site woody and herbaceous obligate seeders are mainly affected by this factor. Other factors, affecting mainly pine regeneration, are the abundance of Quercus coccifera individuals in the ...

 

Vegetation response to a short interval between high-severity wildfires in a mixed-evergreen forest

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 97, No. 1. (January 2009), pp. 142-154, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2008.01456.x

Abstract

[::] Variations in disturbance regime strongly influence ecosystem structure and function. A prominent form of such variation is when multiple high-severity wildfires occur in rapid succession (i.e. short-interval (SI) severe fires, or ‘re-burns’). These events have been proposed as key mechanisms altering successional rates and pathways. [::] We utilized a natural experiment afforded by two overlapping wildfires occurring within a 15-year interval in forests of the Klamath–Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon (USA). We tested for unique effects of a SI fire (15-year interval before ...

 

Wildland fire as a self-regulating mechanism: the role of previous burns and weather in limiting fire progression

  
Ecological Applications, Vol. 25, No. 6. (September 2015), pp. 1478-1492, https://doi.org/10.1890/14-1430.1

Abstract

Theory suggests that natural fire regimes can result in landscapes that are both self-regulating and resilient to fire. For example, because fires consume fuel, they may create barriers to the spread of future fires, thereby regulating fire size. Top-down controls such as weather, however, can weaken this effect. While empirical examples demonstrating this pattern–process feedback between vegetation and fire exist, they have been geographically limited or did not consider the influence of time between fires and weather. The availability of remotely ...

 

Current research issues related to post-wildfire runoff and erosion processes

  
Earth-Science Reviews, Vol. 122 (July 2013), pp. 10-37, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2013.03.004

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Develop an organizational framework for post-wildfire response in different regions. [::] Soil properties are a critical link between infiltration, runoff, and erosion. [::] Need mathematical relations between burn severity metrics and soil properties. [::] Determine physical-based precipitation metrics that best predict runoff and erosion. [::] Incorporate basin morphology in runoff models for steep, rough channels. [Abstract] Research into post-wildfire effects began in the United States more than 70 years ago and only later extended to other parts of the world. Post-wildfire responses are typically transient, episodic, ...

 

Increased wind erosion from forest wildfire: implications for contaminant-related risks

  
Journal of Environment Quality, Vol. 35, No. 2. (2 February 2006), pp. 468-478, https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2005.0112

Abstract

Assessments of contaminant-related human and ecological risk require estimation of transport rates, but few data exist on wind-driven transport rates in nonagricultural systems, particularly in response to ecosystem disturbances such as forest wildfire and also relative to water-driven transport. The Cerro Grande wildfire in May of 2000 burned across ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P.&C. Lawson var. scopulorum Englem.) forest within Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico, where contaminant transport and associated post-fire inhalation risks are of concern. ...

 

Post-fire geomorphic response in steep, forested landscapes: Oregon Coast Range, USA

  
Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 28, No. 11-12. (June 2009), pp. 1131-1146, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.05.003

Abstract

The role of fire in shaping steep, forested landscapes depends on a suite of hydrologic, biologic, and geological characteristics, including the propensity for hydrophobic soil layers to promote runoff erosion during subsequent rainfall events. In the Oregon Coast Range, several studies postulate that fire primarily modulates sediment production via root reinforcement and shallow landslide susceptibility, although few studies have documented post-fire geomorphic response. Here, we describe field observations and topographic analyses for three sites in the central Oregon Coast Range that ...

 

Wildfire-related debris flow from a hazards perspective

  
In Debris-flow Hazards and Related Phenomena (2005), pp. 363-385, https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-27129-5_15

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] Wildland fire can have profound effects on the hydrologic response of a watershed. Consumption of the rainfall-intercepting canopy and of the soil-mantling litter and duff, intensive drying of the soil, combustion of soil-binding organic matter, and the enhancement or formation of water-repellent soils can change the infiltration characteristics and erodibility of the soil, leading to decreased rainfall infiltration, subsequent significantly increased overland flow and runoff in channels, and movement of soil (e.g., Swanson, 1981; Spittler, 1995; Doerr et al., 2000; Martin and Moody, 2001; ...

 

Global trends in wildfire and its impacts: perceptions versus realities in a changing world

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (05 June 2016), 20150345, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0345

Abstract

Wildfire has been an important process affecting the Earth’s surface and atmosphere for over 350 million years and human societies have coexisted with fire since their emergence. Yet many consider wildfire as an accelerating problem, with widely held perceptions both in the media and scientific papers of increasing fire occurrence, severity and resulting losses. However, important exceptions aside, the quantitative evidence available does not support these perceived overall trends. Instead, global area burned appears to have overall declined over past decades, and there is increasing evidence that there is ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 27

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   plant-populations   plant-self-defense   plant-species   plant-species-competition   plant-species-richness   plant-survival   plant-trait   plant-use   plantation   plants   plasticity   platanus-orientalis   platanus-racemosa   platanus-spp   platanus-x-hispanica   platycarya-strobilacea   platymiscium-pinnatum   platypus-sulcatus   plausibility-check   pleurostomophora-richardsiae   pliocene   plumeria-alba   plumeria-rubra   po-plain   poaceae   podocarpus-falcatus   poisonous-plants   poland   polar-ecological-zone   polfc   policy   policy-strategies-for-scientific-uncertainty   pollen   pollen-analysis   pollen-dispersal   pollen-records   pollination   pollinology   pollution   polulation   polydrusus-impressifrons   polygala-myrtifolia   polygraphus-poligraphus   polymath   polymorphism   polypodium   population   population-adaptation   population-decline   population-dynamics   population-growth   population-structuring   population-viability-risk-management   populus-adenopoda   populus-alba   populus-angustifolia   populus-balsamifera   populus-cathayana   populus-deltoides   populus-euphratica   populus-fremontii   populus-grandidentata   populus-ilicifolia   populus-koreana   populus-lasiocarpa   populus-nigra   populus-simonii   populus-spp   populus-szechuanica   populus-tremula   populus-tremuloides   populus-trichocarpa   populus-wettsteinii   populus-x-canescens   populus-x-tomentosa   populus-yunnanensis   porosity   portability   porthetria-dispar   portugal   positional-analysis   post-fire-management   post-fire-regeneration   post-fire-vegetation-dynamics   post-glacial-dispersal   post-glacial-migration   post-normal-science   post-publication-peer-review   postfire-impacts   postfire-recovery   postgis   postglacial-recolonization   postgresql   potential   potential-evapotranspiration   potential-habitat   potential-soil-erosion   potoxylon-melagangai   poverty  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Požar kao ekološki faktor u sukcesiji zajednica Pančićeve omorike i redukovanju njenog areala

  
Zaštita prirode, Vol. 33 (1966), pp. 1-167

Abstract

Title: Fire as an ecological factor in the succession of community of Serbian spruce and reducing its areal ...

 

Fire resistance of European pines

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 256, No. 3. (July 2008), pp. 246-255, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2008.04.032

Abstract

Pine resistance to low- to moderate-intensity fire arises from traits (namely related to tissue insulation from heat) that enable tree survival. Predictive models of the likelihood of tree mortality after fire are quite valuable to assist decision-making after wildfire and to plan prescribed burning. Data and models pertaining to the survival of European pines following fire are reviewed. The type and quality of the current information on fire resistance of the various European species is quite variable. Data from low-intensity fire ...

 

A palaeoecological attempt to classify fire sensitivity of trees in the Southern Alps

  
The Holocene, Vol. 10, No. 5. (2000), pp. 565-574

Abstract

Using pollen percentages and charcoal influx to reconstruct the Holocene vegetation and fire history, we differentiate six possible responses of plants to fire of medium and high frequency: fire-intolerant, fire damaged, fire-sensitive, fire-indifferent, fire-enhanced and fire-adapted. The fire sensitivity of 17 pollen types, representing 20 woody species in the southern Alps, is validated by comparison with today's ecological studies of plant chronosequences. A surprising coincidence of species reaction to fire of medium frequency is character istic for completely different vegetation types, ...

 

Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 22. (3 May 2014), pp. 7964-7967, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1405397111

Abstract

[Significance] Through an examination of shallow ice cores covering a wide area of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), we show that the same mechanism drove two widespread melt events that occurred over 100 years apart, in 1889 and 2012. We found that black carbon from forest fires and rising temperatures combined to cause both of these events, and that continued climate change may result in nearly annual melting of the surface of the GIS by the year 2100. In addition, a ...

 

Managing forests and fire in changing climates

  
Science, Vol. 342, No. 6154. (04 October 2013), pp. 41-42, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1240294

Abstract

With projected climate change, we expect to face much more forest fire in the coming decades. Policy-makers are challenged not to categorize all fires as destructive to ecosystems simply because they have long flame lengths and kill most of the trees within the fire boundary. Ecological context matters: In some ecosystems, high-severity regimes are appropriate, but climate change may modify these fire regimes and ecosystems as well. Some undesirable impacts may be avoided or reduced through global strategies, as well as ...

 

The effects of wildfire on soil wettability and hydrological behaviour of an afforested catchment

  
Journal of Hydrology, Vol. 121, No. 1-4. (December 1990), pp. 239-256, https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-1694(90)90234-o

Abstract

A wildfire in February 1986 destroyed most of an afforested research catchment in the southwestern Cape region of South Africa. The hydrological consequences of the fire were quantified using monitored pre-fire and post-fire stream flow and sediment data from the burned catchment and a nearby control catchment. Soil loss and soil wettability were also measured. In the first year after the fire, weekly stream flow totals increased by 12%, quick flow volumes increased by 201%, peak flow rates increased by 290% ...

 

Predicting postfire sediment yields at the hillslope scale: testing RUSLE and Disturbed WEPP

  
Water Resources Research, Vol. 43, No. 11. (1 November 2007), W11412, https://doi.org/10.1029/2006wr005560

Abstract

High-severity wildfires can increase hillslope-scale sediment yields by several orders of magnitude. Accurate predictions of postfire sediment yields are needed to guide management decisions and assess the potential impact of soil loss on site productivity and downstream aquatic resources. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and Disturbed WEPP are the most commonly used models to predict postfire sediment yields at the hillslope scale, but neither model has been extensively tested against field data. The objectives of this paper are to ...

 

Effects of fire on properties of forest soils: a review

  
Oecologia In Oecologia, Vol. 143, No. 1. (17 March 2005), pp. 1-10, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-004-1788-8

Abstract

Many physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological soil properties can be affected by forest fires. The effects are chiefly a result of burn severity, which consists of peak temperatures and duration of the fire. Climate, vegetation, and topography of the burnt area control the resilience of the soil system; some fire-induced changes can even be permanent. Low to moderate severity fires, such as most of those prescribed in forest management, promote renovation of the dominant vegetation through elimination of undesired species and ...

 

Effects of fire severity and burn patchiness on hillslope-scale surface runoff, erosion and hydrologic connectivity in a prescribed burn

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 310 (December 2013), pp. 219-233, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.08.016

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Sediment loads were ∼1000 times higher on burnt compared with unburnt hillslopes. [::] Runoff and erosion rates were relatively similar on low and high fire severity hillslopes. [::] Unburnt patches reduced sediment loads from upslope burnt areas by 1.3–99.9%. [::] Wider unburnt patches (5–10 m wide) limited hydrologic connectivity most effectively. [::] Unburnt patches (>10 m wide) should be retained in prescribed burns to limit erosion. [Abstract] Fire severity and burn patchiness are frequently cited as important to post-fire surface runoff and erosion, yet few studies ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/postfire-impacts

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.