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Selection: with tag off-site-effects [20 articles] 

 

Risk of post-fire metal mobilization into surface water resources: a review

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 599-600 (December 2017), pp. 1740-1755, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.096

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Forest catchment supply high quality water to a number of communities around the world. [::] Forest fire release sequestered metals from soil organic matter and vegetation. [::] Post-fire erosion rapidly transports these metals to downstream soil and water bodies. [::] Their deposition in the water bodies affects the water quality and aquatic biota. [::] This metal contamination may reach to human being as a consumer. [Abstract] One of the significant economic benefits to communities around the world of having pristine forest catchments is the supply of ...

 

At the nexus of fire, water and society

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (23 May 2016), 20150172, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0172

Abstract

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the effects of fire on the predicted water scarcity and declines in water quality? Drinking water supplies for humans, the emphasis of this exploration, are derived from several land cover types, including forests, grasslands and peatlands, which are vulnerable to fire. In the last two ...

 

A global index for mapping the exposure of water resources to wildfire

  
Forests, Vol. 7, No. 1. (13 January 2016), 22, https://doi.org/10.3390/f7010022

Abstract

Wildfires are keystone components of natural disturbance regimes that maintain ecosystem structure and functions, such as the hydrological cycle, in many parts of the world. Consequently, critical surface freshwater resources can be exposed to post-fire effects disrupting their quantity, quality and regularity. Although well studied at the local scale, the potential extent of these effects has not been examined at the global scale. We take the first step toward a global assessment of the wildfire water risk (WWR) by presenting a ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 23

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   nolina-recurvata   non-array-oriented   non-equilibrium   non-linearity   non-semantic-software-errors   non-stationarity   non-wood-products   nonadditive-measures   nonideal-neurons   nonlinear-correlation   nonlinear-response-to-bioclimatic-predictors   nonmarket-impacts   nonsteady-flame-convection   north-africa   north-america   northern-europe   northern-hemisphere   norway   not-automatic-workflow   notation   notation-as-a-tool-of-thought   nothofagus-cunninghamii   nothofagus-glauca   nothofagus-nervosa   nothofagus-procera   nothofagus-pumilio   nothofagus-spp   notholithocarpus-densiflorus   nothotsuga-spp   nreap-2020   nuclear-disasters   numerical-analysis   numpy   nurse-species   nut-producing-plants   nutrient-gradient   nutrient-recommendations   nutrient-rich-soil   nutrients   nutritional-composition   nyssa-spp   nyssa-sylvatica   oak-decline   oak-hornbeam-forest   oak-shake   object-oriented-programming   occam-razor   ocean-acidification   ocean-circulation   oceans   ochroma-pyramidale   oenothera-spp   off-site-effects   ogc   olea-europaea   olea-spp   oleoresin   olive-decline   olive-oil   ombrotrophic   on-site-effects   ononis-fruticosa   ontologies   open-access   open-access-embargo   open-data   open-field   open-loop-control   open-science   open-source   opengis   openlayers   openstreetmap   operational-research   operophtera-antiqua   operophtera-brumata   ophiostoma-novo-ulmi   ophiostoma-spp   ophiostoma-ulmi   opportunistic-plant-pests   optimization   opuntia-amyclaea   opuntia-ficus-indica   oregon   organic-carbon   organic-material   ornamental-plant   ornamental-trees   orthotomicus-laricis   ostrya-carpinifolia   ostrya-spp   ostryopsis-spp   otiorhynchus-scaber   outbreak   outdated-yield-tables   outputs-vs-outcomes   overexploited-fish-stocks   overfitting  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Dust and biological aerosols from the Sahara and Asia influence precipitation in the Western U.S.

  
Science, Vol. 339, No. 6127. (2013), pp. 1572-1578, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1227279

Abstract

Snowfall in the Sierra Nevada provides a large fraction of the water that California receives as precipitation. Knowing what factors influence the amount of snow that falls is thus critical for projecting how water availability may change in the future. Aerosols have an important effect on cloud processes and precipitation. Creamean et al. (p. 1572, published online 28 February) found that dust and biological aerosols originating from as far away as the Sahara facilitate ice nuclei formation and ice-induced precipitation in ...

 

Sustainable land use in the European Union

  
CULTIVAR Cadernos de Análise e Prospetiva, Vol. 2 (2015), pp. 13-20

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] Soil is defined as the top layer of the earth’s crust. It is formed by mineral particles, organic matter, water, air and living organisms. In fact, soil is an extremely complex, variable and living medium. It can be considered essentially as a non-renewable resource since soil formation is an extremely slow process. Soil provides us with food, biomass and raw materials. It serves as a platform for human activities and landscape. It is also an archive of heritage and plays ...

References

  1. European Commission, 2006. Commission staff working document - Document accompanying the Communication from the Commission to the Council, The European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection - Impact assessment of the thematic strategy on soil protection. Commission Staff Working Document 2006 (SEC/2006/0620).
  2. Fenn, T., Fleet, D., Garrett, L., Daly, E., Elding, C., Hartman, M., Udo, J., 2014. Study on Economic and
 

Climatic impact of global-scale deforestation: radiative versus nonradiative processes

  
Journal of Climate, Vol. 23, No. 1. (1 January 2010), pp. 97-112, https://doi.org/10.1175/2009jcli3102.1

Abstract

A fully coupled land-ocean-atmosphere GCM is used to explore the biogeophysical impact of large-scale deforestation on surface climate. By analyzing the model sensitivity to global-scale replacement of forests by grassland, it is shown that the surface albedo increase owing to deforestation has a cooling effect of -1.36 K globally. On the other hand, forest removal decreases evapotranspiration efficiency and decreases surface roughness, both leading to a global surface warming of 0.24 and 0.29 K, respectively. The net biogeophysical impact of deforestation ...

 

BVOCs: plant defense against climate warming?

  
Trends in Plant Science, Vol. 8, No. 3. (16 June 2015), pp. 105-109, https://doi.org/10.1016/s1360-1385(03)00008-6

Abstract

Plants emit a substantial amount of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) into the atmosphere. These BVOCs represent a large carbon loss and can be up to ∼10% of that fixed by photosynthesis under stressful conditions and up to 100 g C m−2 per year in some tropical ecosystems. Among a variety of proven and unproven BVOC functions in plants and roles in atmospheric processes, recent data intriguingly link emission of these compounds to climate. Ongoing research demonstrates that BVOCs could protect ...

 

Boreal forests, aerosols and the impacts on clouds and climate

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 366, No. 1885. (28 December 2008), pp. 4613-4626, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2008.0201

Abstract

Previous studies have concluded that boreal forests warm the climate because the cooling from storage of carbon in vegetation and soils is cancelled out by the warming due to the absorption of the Sun's heat by the dark forest canopy. However, these studies ignored the impacts of forests on atmospheric aerosol. We use a global atmospheric model to show that, through emission of organic vapours and the resulting condensational growth of newly formed particles, boreal forests double regional cloud condensation nuclei ...

 

As volcano rumbles, scientists plan for aviation alerts

  
Science, Vol. 345, No. 6200. (29 August 2014), pp. 990-990, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.345.6200.990

Abstract

Iceland's Bárðarbunga volcano, buried under the giant Vatnajökull glacier, has been holding scientists in suspense over the last 2 weeks, producing frequent seismic rumbles but no signs yet of an actual eruption. But scientists at the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) in Reykjavík are now seasoned by back-to-back eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 and Grímsvötn in 2011 that produced large ash clouds and caused costly air traffic snarls. IMO is leading a European Union–funded effort called FUTUREVOLC to build a comprehensive database ...

 

Tree hitched a ride to island

  
Nature, Vol. 510, No. 7505. (18 June 2014), pp. 320-321, https://doi.org/10.1038/510320a

Abstract

Acacia analysis reveals globetrotting seed trekked 18,000 kilometres from Hawaii to Réunion. [excerpt] In what is probably the farthest single dispersal event ever recorded, researchers have shown using genetic analysis that an acacia tree endemic to Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean is directly descended from a common Hawaiian tree known as the koa. In fact, these two trees on small specks of land on opposite sides of the globe turn out to be the same species. The event is remarkable not ...

 

On the Role of Climate Forcing by Volcanic Sulphate and Volcanic Ash

  
Advances in Meteorology, Vol. 2014 (2014), pp. 1-17, https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/340123

Abstract

There is overall agreement that volcanic sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere can reduce solar radiation reaching the earth’s surface for years, thereby reducing surface temperatures, affecting global circulation patterns and generally the global climate system. However, the response of the climate system after large volcanic eruptions is not fully understood and global climate models have difficulties to reproduce the observed variability of the earth system after large volcanic eruptions until now. For geological timescales, it has been suggested that, in addition ...

 

A 7000 yr perspective on volcanic ash clouds affecting northern Europe

  
Geology, Vol. 39, No. 9. (05 August 2011), pp. 887-890, https://doi.org/10.1130/g32146.1

Abstract

The ash cloud resulting from the A.D. 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland caused severe disruption to air travel across Europe, but as a geological event it is not unprecedented. Analysis of peats and lake sediments from northern Europe has revealed the presence of microscopic layers of Icelandic volcanic ash (tephra). These sedimentary records, together with historical records of Holocene ash falls, demonstrate that Icelandic volcanoes have generated substantial ash clouds that reached northern Europe many times. Here we present the ...

 

The effects and consequences of very large explosive volcanic eruptions

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 364, No. 1845. (15 August 2006), pp. 2073-2097, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2006.1814

Abstract

Every now and again Earth experiences tremendous explosive volcanic eruptions, considerably bigger than the largest witnessed in historic times. Those yielding more than 450 km3 of magma have been called super-eruptions. The record of such eruptions is incomplete; the most recent known example occurred 26 000 years ago. It is more likely that the Earth will next experience a super-eruption than an impact from a large meteorite greater than 1 km in diameter. Depending on where the volcano is located, the effects will be ...

 

Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 22. (3 May 2014), pp. 7964-7967, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1405397111

Abstract

[Significance] Through an examination of shallow ice cores covering a wide area of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), we show that the same mechanism drove two widespread melt events that occurred over 100 years apart, in 1889 and 2012. We found that black carbon from forest fires and rising temperatures combined to cause both of these events, and that continued climate change may result in nearly annual melting of the surface of the GIS by the year 2100. In addition, a ...

 

Soil erosion impact on agronomic productivity and environment quality

  
Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, Vol. 17, No. 4. (1 July 1998), pp. 319-464, https://doi.org/10.1080/07352689891304249

Abstract

Soil erosion is a global issue because of its severe adverse economic and environmental impacts. Economic impacts on productivity may be due to direct effects on crops/plants on-site and off-site, and environmental consequences are primarily off-site due either to pollution of natural waters or adverse effects on air quality due to dust and emissions of radiatively active gases. Off-site economic effects of erosion are related to the damage to civil structure, siltation of water ways and reservoirs, and additional costs involved ...

 

Wildfires as a Source of Aerosol Particles Transported to the Northern European Regions

  
The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry, Vol. 26 (2012), pp. 1-21, https://doi.org/10.1007/698_2012_169

Abstract

Each year large areas of forested land in Europe are burned by more than 50,000 fires. Over the past few years, climatic anomalies in temperature and precipitation have resulted in an increase in fire events. The exceptional fire occurrences in the 2000s and their regional consequences on atmospheric air quality have been observed in the northern European regions. In the last 10 years almost annually the episodes of long-range transported (LRT) biomass smokes from Eastern European fires have been reported, exceptionally ...

 

Temperature-driven range expansion of an irruptive insect heightened by weakly coevolved plant defenses

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, No. 6. (05 February 2013), pp. 2193-2198, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1216666110

Abstract

Warming climate has increased access of native bark beetles to high-elevation pines that historically received only intermittent exposure to these tree-killing herbivores. Here we show that a dominant, relatively naïve, high-elevation species, whitebark pine, has inferior defenses against mountain pine beetle compared with its historical lower-elevation host, lodgepole pine. Lodgepole pines respond by exuding more resin and accumulating higher concentrations of toxic monoterpenes than whitebark pine, where they co-occur. Furthermore, the chemical composition of whitebark pine appears less able to inhibit ...

 

The costs of soil erosion

  
Revista Brasileira de Ciência do Solo, Vol. 35, No. 2. (April 2011), pp. 287-298, https://doi.org/10.1590/s0100-06832011000200001

Abstract

The aim of this study was a survey of the estimated costs of soil erosion, an issue of fundamental importance in view of the current worldwide discussions on sustainability. A list was drawn up of research papers on erosion (on-site and off-site effects) and their respective costs. The estimates indicate the amount of resources spent in the process of soil degradation, raising a general awareness of the need for soil conservation. On-site costs affect the production units directly, while off-site costs ...

 

A quantitative review of ecosystem service studies: approaches, shortcomings and the road ahead

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 48, No. 3. (1 June 2011), pp. 630-636, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2664.2010.01952.x

Abstract

1. Ecosystem services are defined as the benefits that humans obtain from ecosystems. Employing the ecosystem service concept is intended to support the development of policies and instruments that integrate social, economic and ecological perspectives. In recent years, this concept has become the paradigm of ecosystem management. 2. The prolific use of the term ‘ecosystem services’ in scientific studies has given rise to concerns about its arbitrary application. A quantitative review of recent literature shows the diversity of approaches and uncovers a lack ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/off-site-effects

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.