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Selection: with tag networks [32 articles] 

 

Beyond pairwise mechanisms of species coexistence in complex communities

  
Nature, Vol. 546, No. 7656. (31 May 2017), pp. 56-64, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature22898

Abstract

The tremendous diversity of species in ecological communities has motivated a century of research into the mechanisms that maintain biodiversity. However, much of this work examines the coexistence of just pairs of competitors. This approach ignores those mechanisms of coexistence that emerge only in diverse competitive networks. Despite the potential for these mechanisms to create conditions under which the loss of one competitor triggers the loss of others, we lack the knowledge needed to judge their importance for coexistence in nature. ...

 

A concise review on the role of author self-citations in information science, bibliometrics and science policy

  
Scientometrics, Vol. 67, No. 2. (2006), pp. 263-277, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-006-0098-9

Abstract

The objective of the present study is twofold: (1) to show the aims and means of quantitative interpretation of bibliographic features in bibliometrics and their re-interpretation in research policy, and (2) to summarise the state-of-art in self-citation research. The authors describe three approaches to the role of author self-citations and possible conflicts arising from the different perspectives. From the bibliometric viewpoint we can conclude that that there is no reason for condemning self-citations in general or for removing them from macro ...

 

System-of-Systems engineering management: a review of modern history and a path forward

  
IEEE Systems Journal, Vol. 2, No. 4. (18 December 2008), pp. 484-499, https://doi.org/10.1109/jsyst.2008.2007163

Abstract

As our knowledge of system of systems (SoS) has grown and evolved, so has our understanding of how to engineer and manage them. In systems engineering, we develop architectures and frameworks to bring meaning to this kind of uncertainty, but for SoS engineering (SoSE) we are still in search of how we can structure this understanding. In this paper, we review the SoS literature to illustrate the need to create an SoSE management framework based on the demands of constant technological ...

 

A global map of roadless areas and their conservation status

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6318. (16 December 2016), pp. 1423-1427, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf7166

Abstract

[Too many roads] Roads have done much to help humanity spread across the planet and maintain global movement and trade. However, roads also damage wild areas and rapidly contribute to habitat degradation and species loss. Ibisch et al. cataloged the world's roads. Though most of the world is not covered by roads, it is fragmented by them, with only 7% of land patches created by roads being greater than 100 km2. Furthermore, environmental protection of roadless areas is insufficient, which could lead ...

 

Network analysis reveals why Xylella fastidiosa will persist in Europe

  
Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1. (6 March 2017), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-00077-z

Abstract

The insect vector borne bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was first detected in olive trees in Southern Italy in 2013, and identified as the main culprit behind the ‘olive quick decline syndrome’. Since then, the disease has spread rapidly through Italy’s main olive oil producing region. The epidemiology of the outbreak is largely unstudied, with the list of X. fastidiosa hosts and vectors in Europe likely incomplete, and the role humans play in dispersal unknown. These knowledge gaps have led to management strategies ...

 

Involve social scientists in defining the Anthropocene

  
Nature, Vol. 540, No. 7632. (7 December 2016), pp. 192-193, https://doi.org/10.1038/540192a

Abstract

The causes of Earth's transition are human and social, write Erle Ellis and colleagues, so scholars from those disciplines must be included in its formalization. ...

 

System crash as dynamics of complex networks

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 42. (18 October 2016), pp. 11726-11731, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1612094113

Abstract

[Significance] System crash, as an essential part of system evolution, sometimes happens in peculiar manners: Weakened systems may survive for a surprisingly long time before suddenly meeting their final ends, whereas seemingly unbeatable giants may drastically crash to virtual nonexistence. We propose a model that describes system crash as a consequence of some relatively simple local information-based individual behaviors: Individuals leave networks according to some most straightforward assessment of current and future benefits/risks. Of note, such a simple rule may enable a ...

 

Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 11. (15 March 2016), pp. 2982-2987, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1518798113

Abstract

[Significance] The remarkable ecological success of the human species has been attributed to our capacity to overcome environmental challenges through the development of complex technologies. Complex technologies are typically beyond the inventive capacities of individuals and result from a population process by which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population’s ability to develop technologies is positively affected by its size and connectedness. Here, we present an experiment demonstrating that partially connected groups ...

 

How chimpanzees cooperate in a competitive world

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 36. (06 September 2016), pp. 10215-10220, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611826113

Abstract

[Significance] Competitive tendencies may make it hard for members of a group to cooperate with each other. Humans use many different “enforcement” strategies to keep competition in check and favor cooperation. To test whether one of our closest relatives uses similar strategies, we gave a group of chimpanzees a cooperative problem that required joint action by two or three individuals. The open-group set-up allowed the chimpanzees a choice between cooperation and competitive behavior like freeloading. The chimpanzees used a combination of partner ...

 

Higher-order organization of complex networks

  
Science, Vol. 353, No. 6295. (26 July 2016), pp. 163-166, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aad9029
Keywords: complexity   connectivity   networks   pattern  

Abstract

[Resolving a network of hubs] Graphs are a pervasive tool for modeling and analyzing network data throughout the sciences. Benson et al. developed an algorithmic framework for studying how complex networks are organized by higher-order connectivity patterns (see the Perspective by Pržulj and Malod-Dognin). Motifs in transportation networks reveal hubs and geographical elements not readily achievable by other methods. A motif previously suggested as important for neuronal networks is part of a “rich club” of subnetworks. [Abstract] Networks are a fundamental tool for understanding ...

 

Bias in species range estimates from minimum convex polygons: implications for conservation and options for improved planning

  
Animal Conservation, Vol. 6, No. 1. (February 2003), pp. 19-28, https://doi.org/10.1017/s1367943003003044

Abstract

Minimum convex polygons (convex hulls) are an internationally accepted, standard method for estimating species' ranges, particularly in circumstances in which presence-only data are the only kind of spatially explicit data available. One of their main strengths is their simplicity. They are used to make area statements and to assess trends in occupied habitat, and are an important part of the assessment of the conservation status of species. We show by simulation that these estimates are biased. The bias increases with sample ...

 

Coextinction and persistence of dependent species in a changing world

  
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Vol. 43, No. 1. (2012), pp. 183-203, https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-110411-160304

Abstract

The extinction of a single species is rarely an isolated event. Instead, dependent parasites, commensals, and mutualist partners (affiliates) face the risk of coextinction as their hosts or partners decline and fail. Species interactions in ecological networks can transmit the effects of primary extinctions within and between trophic levels, causing secondary extinctions and extinction cascades. Documenting coextinctions is complicated by ignorance of host specificity, limitations of historical collections, incomplete systematics of affiliate taxa, and lack of experimental studies. Host shifts may ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 22

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   monitoring   monochamus-galloprovincialis   monochamus-spp   monography   monoterpenes   monsoon   montane-belt   monte-carlo   monte-carlo-trajectory   monumental-trees   mordwilkoja-vagabundus   morinda-citrifolia   moringa-oleifera   morocco   morphological-adaptations   morphological-traits   morphology   mortality   morus-alba   morus-nigra   morus-spp   mountainous-areas   muddy-floods   multi-criteria-decision-analysis   multi-objective-planning   multi-scale   multi-stakeholder-decision-making   multiauthor   multiple-adaptive-regression-splines   multiplicative-structure   multiplicity   mushrooms   mycorrhizal-fungi   mycosphaerella-dearnessii   mycosphaerella-pini   myopic-heuristics   myrica-cerifera   myrica-gale   myricaria-germanica   myristica-fragrans   myrrhoides-nodosa   myrtus-communis   myths   myzocallis-coryli   nasa   native-vegetation   natura-2000   natural-disasters   natural-disturbance   natural-ecosystems   natural-hazards   natural-loss   natural-product-herbicides   natural-resources-interactions   naturalised-species   nauclea-diderichii   ndvi   neanderthals   near-surface-flowpaths   nectaroscordum-siculum   nectria-coccinea   negative-emissions   negative-learning   negative-studies   neglecting-non-monetary-criteria   negotiation   neighbourhood-analysis   nematus-melanaspis   nematus-oligospilus   nemoral-climate   neocallitropsis-pancheri   neodiprion-sertifer   neofusicoccum-parvum   neogene   neonicotinoid   nepal   nephelium-lappaceum   nerium-oleander   nested-loops-and-conditional-structures   netherlands   network-representation-capability   networks   neural-networks   neuro-dynamic-programming   neuroterus-spp   new-forested-areas   new-species   new-zealand   niche-model   niche-modelling   niche-sourcing   nickel   nitrogen   nitrogen-deposition   nitrogen-fixation   nitrogen-leaching   nitrogen-partitioning   no-analogue   no-free-lunch-theorem  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Quantifying seasonal population fluxes driving rubella transmission dynamics using mobile phone data

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 35. (01 September 2015), pp. 11114-11119, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1423542112

Abstract

[Significance] Changing patterns of human mobility can drive seasonal outbreaks of infectious diseases, but limited data about travel behavior and population flux over time have made this idea difficult to quantify. Mobile phone data provide a unique source of information about human travel. Here we quantify seasonal travel patterns using mobile phone data from nearly 15 million anonymous subscribers in Kenya. Using a rich data source of rubella incidence, we show that patterns of population fluxes inferred from mobile phone data are ...

 

Reduced vaccination and the risk of measles and other childhood infections post-Ebola

  
Science, Vol. 347, No. 6227. (12 March 2015), pp. 1240-1242, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaa3438

Abstract

[Editor summary: Vaccinate children despite Ebola] During the medical emergency caused by the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, routine childhood vaccination programs have been suspended. If vaccination is not resumed soon, there could be even more deaths. Measles is highly infectious, and outbreaks are a sign of health care systems in trouble. Using mathematical modelling, Takahashi et al. estimate that about a million children across Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea are vulnerable to measles. Aggressive public health programs are vital for ...

 

Belowground carbon trade among tall trees in a temperate forest

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6283. (14 April 2016), pp. 342-344, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aad6188

Abstract

[Editor summary: Carbon trading between adult trees] Competition between individual plants for resources is well known, but sharing of resources may also occur. Klein et al. observed tree-to-tree carbon shuttling between roots of tall trees in a mixed temperate forest in Switzerland (see the Perspective by van der Heijden). By applying stable carbon isotope labeling to individual tree canopies, they show that up to 40% of the carbon in the fine roots of one individual may be derived from photosynthetic products of ...

 

Underground networking

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6283. (14 April 2016), pp. 290-291, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf4694

Abstract

Almost all land plants, including most trees, shrubs, and herbs, form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi (1). These soil fungi acquire nutrients that they transfer to their plant hosts in exchange for carbon (see the photo). Plants in natural vegetation can acquire up to 80% of nitrogen and phosphorus from their mycorrhizal associates (2). Individual mycorrhizal fungi can simultaneously colonize many plant hosts of the same species or different species. As a result, plants in natural communities are interconnected by mycorrhizal ...

 

Fractal dimension of a transportation network and its relationship with urban growth: a study of the Dallas - Fort Worth area

  
Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Vol. 31, No. 6. (2004), pp. 895-911, https://doi.org/10.1068/b3163

Abstract

A city and its transportation network are both complicated systems. Fractal geometry provides an effective way to describe the complex property of geographical features. This paper uses a modified box-counting method to describe the fractal property of urban transportation networks. Assuming that human settlements of different sizes are all operated by the same growth procedure, this paper investigates the relationship between the mass size of cities and the complexity of their road systems. The results confirm that, as cities grow from ...

 

Key structural forest connectors can be identified by combining landscape spatial pattern and network analyses

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 262, No. 2. (July 2011), pp. 150-160, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2011.03.017

Abstract

Conservation and enhancement of ecological connectivity is widely recognized as one of the key objectives of forest landscape management. However, practical difficulties still exist due to the lack of pragmatic and operational methodologies that can be efficiently applied for these purposes within the scope of a forest management plan. Here we present the novel integration of two recent approaches for analyzing forest structural connectivity that offers considerable synergies and potential relevant benefits for forest planning at a variety of scales. We ...

 

EDITOR'S CHOICE: Stepping stones are crucial for species' long-distance dispersal and range expansion through habitat networks

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 51, No. 1. (1 February 2014), pp. 171-182, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12179

Abstract

[:1] Climate and land-use changes will require species to move large distances following shifts in their suitable habitats, which will frequently involve traversing intensively human-modified landscapes. Practitioners will therefore need to evaluate and act to enhance the degree to which habitat patches scattered throughout the landscape may function as stepping stones facilitating dispersal among otherwise isolated habitat areas. [:2] We formulate a new generalized network model of habitat connectivity that accounts for the number of dispersing individuals and for long-distance ...

 

Contrasting views of complexity and their implications for network-centric infrastructures

  
Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Part A: Systems and Humans, IEEE Transactions on, Vol. 40, No. 4. (July 2010), pp. 839-852, https://doi.org/10.1109/tsmca.2010.2048027

Abstract

There exists a widely recognized need to better understand and manage complex “systems of systems,” ranging from biology, ecology, and medicine to network-centric technologies. This is motivating the search for universal laws of highly evolved systems and driving demand for new mathematics and methods that are consistent, integrative, and predictive. However, the theoretical frameworks available today are not merely fragmented but sometimes contradictory and incompatible. We argue that complexity arises in highly evolved biological and technological systems primarily to provide mechanisms ...

 

The relationship between acquaintanceship and coauthorship in scientific collaboration networks

  
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 62, No. 11. (November 2011), pp. 2121-2132, https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21629

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between acquaintanceship and coauthorship patterns in a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, geographically distributed research center. Two social networks are constructed and compared: a network of coauthorship, representing how researchers write articles with one another, and a network of acquaintanceship, representing how those researchers know each other on a personal level, based on their responses to an online survey. Statistical analyses of the topology and community structure of these networks point to the importance of small-scale, local, personal networks ...

 

Evolution and selection of river networks: Statics, dynamics, and complexity

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 7. (18 February 2014), pp. 2417-2424, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1322700111

Abstract

[Significance] Our focus is on a rich interdisciplinary problem touching on earth science, hydrology, and statistical mechanics—an understanding of the statics and dynamics of the network structures that we observe in the fluvial landscape, and their relation to evolution and selection of recurrent patterns of self-organization. It is an exemplar of how diverse ideas, numerical simulation, and elementary mathematics can come together to help solve the mystery of understanding a ubiquitous pattern of nature. [Abstract] Moving from the exact result that ...

 

Fourth class of convex equilateral polyhedron with polyhedral symmetry related to fullerenes and viruses

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 8. (25 February 2014), pp. 2920-2925, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1310939111
Keywords: mathematics   networks   topology  

Abstract

[Significance] The Greeks described two classes of convex equilateral polyhedron with polyhedral symmetry, the Platonic (including the tetrahedron, octahedron, and icosahedron) and the Archimedean (including the truncated icosahedron with its soccer-ball shape). Johannes Kepler discovered a third class, the rhombic polyhedra. Some carbon fullerenes, inorganic cages, icosahedral viruses, protein complexes, and geodesic structures resemble these polyhedra. Here we add a fourth class, “Goldberg polyhedra.” Their small (corner) faces are regular 3gons, 4gons, or 5gons, whereas their planar 6gonal faces are equilateral ...

 

Inefficient epidemic spreading in scale-free networks

  
Physical Review E, Vol. 77, No. 2. (Feb 2008), 026113, https://doi.org/10.1103/physreve.77.026113

Abstract

Highly heterogeneous degree distributions yield efficient spreading of simple epidemics through networks, but can be inefficient with more complex epidemiological processes. We study diseases with nonlinear force of infection whose prevalences can abruptly collapse to zero while decreasing the transmission parameters. We find that scale-free networks can be unable to support diseases that, on the contrary, are able to persist at high endemic levels in homogeneous networks with the same average degree. ...

 

Profiling core-periphery network structure by random walkers

  
Scientific Reports, Vol. 3 (19 March 2013), https://doi.org/10.1038/srep01467

Abstract

Disclosing the main features of the structure of a network is crucial to understand a number of static and dynamic properties, such as robustness to failures, spreading dynamics, or collective behaviours. Among the possible characterizations, the core-periphery paradigm models the network as the union of a dense core with a sparsely connected periphery, highlighting the role of each node on the basis of its topological position. Here we show that the core-periphery structure can effectively be profiled by elaborating the behaviour ...

 

Efficient discovery of overlapping communities in massive networks

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, No. 36. (03 September 2013), pp. 14534-14539, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1221839110

Abstract

Detecting overlapping communities is essential to analyzing and exploring natural networks such as social networks, biological networks, and citation networks. However, most existing approaches do not scale to the size of networks that we regularly observe in the real world. In this paper, we develop a scalable approach to community detection that discovers overlapping communities in massive real-world networks. Our approach is based on a Bayesian model of networks that allows nodes to participate in multiple communities, and a corresponding algorithm ...

 

The extreme vulnerability of interdependent spatially embedded networks

  
Nat Phys, Vol. 9, No. 10. (25 October 2013), pp. 667-672, https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys2727

Abstract

Recent studies show that in interdependent networks a very small failure in one network may lead to catastrophic consequences. Above a critical fraction of interdependent nodes, even a single node failure can invoke cascading failures that may abruptly fragment the system, whereas below this critical dependency a failure of a few nodes leads only to a small amount of damage to the system. So far, research has focused on interdependent random networks without space limitations. However, many real systems, such as ...

 

Facebook use predicts declines in subjective well-being in young adults

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 8. (14 August 2013), e69841, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Abstract

Over 500 million people interact daily with Facebook. Yet, whether Facebook use influences subjective well-being over time is unknown. We addressed this issue using experience-sampling, the most reliable method for measuring in-vivo behavior and psychological experience. We text-messaged people five times per day for two-weeks to examine how Facebook use influences the two components of subjective well-being: how people feel moment-to-moment and how satisfied they are with their lives. Our results indicate that Facebook use predicts negative shifts on both of ...

 

An a posteriori measure of network modularity

  

Abstract

Measuring modularity is important to understand the structure of networks, and has an important number of real-world implications. However, several measures exists to assess the modularity, and give both different modularity values and different modules composition. In this article, I propose an a posteriori measure of modularity, which represents the ratio of interactions between members of the same modules vs. members of different modules. I apply this measure to a large dataset of 290 ecological networks, to show that it gives ...

 

Statistical mechanics of complex networks

  
Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 74, No. 1. (Jan 2002), pp. 47-97, https://doi.org/10.1103/revmodphys.74.47

Abstract

Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. Frequently cited examples include the cell, a network of chemicals linked by chemical reactions, and the Internet, a network of routers and computers connected by physical links. While traditionally these systems have been modeled as random graphs, it is increasingly recognized that the topology and evolution of real networks are governed by robust organizing principles. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of complex networks, focusing on ...

 

Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks

  
Nature, Vol. 464, No. 7291. (15 April 2010), pp. 1025-1028, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature08932

Abstract

Complex networks have been studied intensively for a decade, but research still focuses on the limited case of a single, non-interacting network. Modern systems are coupled together and therefore should be modelled as interdependent networks. A fundamental property of interdependent networks is that failure of nodes in one network may lead to failure of dependent nodes in other networks. This may happen recursively and can lead to a cascade of failures. In fact, a failure of a very small fraction of ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/networks

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.