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Selection: with tag limiting-factor [34 articles] 

 

Effects of fish in river food webs

  
Science, Vol. 250, No. 4982. (09 November 1990), pp. 811-814, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.250.4982.811

Abstract

Experimental manipulations of fish in a Northern California river during summer base flow reveal that they have large effects on predators, herbivores, and plants in river food webs. California roach and juvenile steelhead consume predatory insects and fish fry, which feed on algivorous chironomid larvae. In the presence of fish, filamentous green algae are reduced to low, prostrate webs, infested with chironomids. When the absence of large fish releases smaller predators that suppress chironomids, algal biomass is higher, and tall upright ...

 

Competing species leave many potential niches unfilled

  
Nature Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 1, No. 10. (18 September 2017), pp. 1495-1501, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-017-0295-3

Abstract

A cornerstone of biology is that coexisting species evolve to occupy separate ecological niches. Classical theory predicts that interspecific competition should lead to all potential niches being occupied, yet observational data suggest that many niches are unfilled. Here we show that theory can be reconciled with observational data by reconceptualizing competition in the Hutchinsonian niche space to distinguish between substitutable and non-substitutable resources. When resources are substitutable (for example, seeds of different size), the components of competition along the niche axes ...

 

Fitness of multidimensional phenotypes in dynamic adaptive landscapes

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 30, No. 8. (August 2015), pp. 487-496, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.06.003

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Integrating fitness into community ecology will improve trait-based predictions. [::] Dynamic adaptive landscapes link phenotypes to fitness across environments. [::] Fitness is a function of multidimensional phenotype–environment interactions. [::] Intraspecific trait covariation constrains environmental niche breadth. [Abstract] Phenotypic traits influence species distributions, but ecology lacks established links between multidimensional phenotypes and fitness for predicting species responses to environmental change. The common focus on single traits rather than multiple trait combinations limits our understanding of their adaptive value, and intraspecific trait covariation has been neglected in ...

 

Ecological limits to plant phenotypic plasticity

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 176, No. 4. (December 2007), pp. 749-763, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02275.x

Abstract

Phenotypic plasticity is considered the major means by which plants cope with environmental heterogeneity. Although ubiquitous in nature, actual phenotypic plasticity is far from being maximal. This has been explained by the existence of internal limits to its expression. However, phenotypic plasticity takes place within an ecological context and plants are generally exposed to multifactor environments and to simultaneous interactions with many species. These external, ecological factors may limit phenotypic plasticity or curtail its adaptive value, but seldom have they been ...

 

Evolutionary and plastic responses to climate change in terrestrial plant populations

  
Evolutionary Applications, Vol. 7, No. 1. (January 2014), pp. 123-139, https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.12112

Abstract

As climate change progresses, we are observing widespread changes in phenotypes in many plant populations. Whether these phenotypic changes are directly caused by climate change, and whether they result from phenotypic plasticity or evolution, are active areas of investigation. Here, we review terrestrial plant studies addressing these questions. Plastic and evolutionary responses to climate change are clearly occurring. Of the 38 studies that met our criteria for inclusion, all found plastic or evolutionary responses, with 26 studies showing both. These responses, ...

 

Addition of multiple limiting resources reduces grassland diversity

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7618. (24 August 2016), pp. 93-96, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature19324

Abstract

Niche dimensionality provides a general theoretical explanation for biodiversitymore niches, defined by more limiting factors, allow for more ways that species can coexist. Because plant species compete for the same set of limiting resources, theory predicts that addition of a limiting resource eliminates potential trade-offs, reducing the number of species that can coexist. Multiple nutrient limitation of plant production is common and therefore fertilization may reduce diversity by reducing the number or dimensionality of belowground limiting factors. At the same time, ...

 

Ecology: more is less

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7618. (31 August 2016), pp. 42-42, https://doi.org/10.1038/537042a

Abstract

[Excerpt] Plants compete for the same resources, such as nutrients, light and water. Because these resources are often limited, the coexistence of plant species requires the creation of trade-offs in resource use. In this issue, Harpole et al. report that increasing a limited nutrient in grassland can eliminate these potential trade-offs, reducing overall species diversity (W. S. Harpole et al. Nature 537, 93–96; 2016). [\n] The authors considered 45 grassland sites across 6 continents, and measured species diversity in response to various ...

 

Grassland species loss resulting from reduced niche dimension

  
Nature, Vol. 446, No. 7137. (25 March 2007), pp. 791-793, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05684

Abstract

Intact ecosystems contain large numbers of competing but coexisting species. Although numerous alternative theories have provided potential explanations for this high biodiversity, there have been few field experiments testing between these theories. In particular, theory predicts that higher diversity of coexisting competitors could result from greater niche dimensionality1, for example larger numbers of limiting resources or factors. Alternatively, diversity could be independent of niche dimensionality because large numbers of species can coexist when limited by just one or two factors if ...

 

Size asymmetry of resource competition and the structure of plant communities

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 104, No. 4. (July 2016), pp. 899-910, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12557

Abstract

Plant communities show two general responses to gradients of soil resources: a decrease in species richness at high levels of resource availability and an associated shift in species composition from small and slow-growing species to large and fast-growing species. Models attempting to explain these responses have usually focused on a single pattern and provided contradicting predictions concerning the underlying mechanisms. [\n] We use an extension of Tilman's resource competition model to investigate the hypothesis that both patterns may ...

 

Size asymmetry of resource competition and the structure of plant communities: commentary on DeMalach et al 2016

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 104, No. 4. (July 2016), pp. 911-912, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12591

Abstract

[Excerpt] The hump-back relationship between diversity and productivity is one of the well-known patterns in ecology that have defied unequivocal explanation (Mittelbach et al. 2001; Šímová, Li & Storch 2013). While it has often been argued that the decline of species richness under high productivity is due to more intense competition, it has never been made fully clear why extinction under high productivity should be more likely compared to low productivity. DeMalach et al. (2016) present a simple and elegant explanation: it ...

 

Community genetics: resource addition has opposing effects on genetic and species diversity in a 150-year experiment

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 12, No. 2. (February 2009), pp. 165-170, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2008.01273.x

Abstract

We used the Park Grass Experiment, begun in 1856, to test alternative hypotheses about the relationship between genetic diversity and plant species diversity. The niche variation hypothesis predicts that populations with few interspecific competitors and hence broader niches are expected to contain greater genetic diversity. The coexistence hypothesis predicts that genetic diversity within species favours coexistence among species and therefore species and genetic diversity should be positively correlated. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to measure the genetic diversity ...

 

Effects of resource additions on species richness and ANPP in an alpine meadow community

  
Journal of Plant Ecology, Vol. 3, No. 1. (01 March 2010), pp. 25-31, https://doi.org/10.1093/jpe/rtp034

Abstract

[Aims] Theories based on resource additions indicate that plant species richness is mainly determined by the number of limiting resources. However, the individual effects of various limiting resources on species richness and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) are less well understood. Here, we analyzed potential linkages between additions of limiting resources, species loss and ANPP increase and further explored the underlying mechanisms. [Methods] Resources (N, P, K and water) were added in a completely randomized block design to alpine meadow plots in ...

 

Nutrient co-limitation of primary producer communities

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 14, No. 9. (September 2011), pp. 852-862, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01651.x

Abstract

Synergistic interactions between multiple limiting resources are common, highlighting the importance of co-limitation as a constraint on primary production. Our concept of resource limitation has shifted over the past two decades from an earlier paradigm of single-resource limitation towards concepts of co-limitation by multiple resources, which are predicted by various theories. Herein, we summarise multiple-resource limitation responses in plant communities using a dataset of 641 studies that applied factorial addition of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in freshwater, marine and terrestrial ...

 

Where, why and how? Explaining the low-temperature range limits of temperate tree species

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 104, No. 4. (July 2016), pp. 1076-1088, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12574

Abstract

Attempts at explaining range limits of temperate tree species still rest on correlations with climatic data that lack a physiological justification. Here, we present a synthesis of a multidisciplinary project that offers mechanistic explanations. Employing climatology, biogeography, dendrology, population and reproduction biology, stress physiology and phenology, we combine results from in situ elevational (Swiss Alps) and latitudinal (Alps vs. Scandinavia) comparisons, from reciprocal common garden and phytotron studies for eight European broadleaf tree species. [\n] We show that ...

 

Regional estimation of woodland moisture content by inverting Radiative Transfer Models

  
Remote Sensing of Environment, Vol. 132 (May 2013), pp. 59-70, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2013.01.004

Abstract

[Abstract] We inverted the PROSPECT and GEOSAIL Radiative Transfer Models (RTM) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to retrieve Live Fuel Moisture Content (LFMC) in woodlands located in the peninsular territory of Spain. Ecological rules were used to parameterize the RTM. This approach reduces the probability of an ill-posed problem in the inversion of the selected RTMs, by rejecting unrealistic combinations of input parameters. Three species representatives of each region were used to derive the ecological rules: Quercus ilex L., Quercus ...

 

Species richness at continental scales is dominated by ecological limits

  
The American Naturalist, Vol. 185, No. 5. (1 May 2015), pp. 572-583, https://doi.org/10.1086/680850

Abstract

Explaining variation in species richness among provinces and other large geographic regions remains one of the most challenging problems at the intersection of ecology and evolution. Here we argue that empirical evidence supports a model whereby ecological factors associated with resource availability regulate species richness at continental scales. Any large-scale predictive model for biological diversity must explain three robust patterns in the natural world. First, species richness for evolutionary biotas is highly correlated with resource-associated surrogate variables, including area, temperature, and ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 19

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: inrmm-list-of-tags   lag-effect   lagarostrobos-franklinii   lagerstroemia-speciosa   lagoon   lagunaria-patersoni   laguncularia-racemosa   lai   lamiastrum-galeobdolon   land   land-cover   land-disuse   land-evaluation   land-use   land-use-changes   land-use-driven-climate-change   land-use-dynamics   land-use-intensity   landform   landsat   landscape   landscape-dynamics   landscape-genetics   landscape-modelling   landslides   landslides-as-major-erosion-process   language-design   languages   languages-death   large-scale   large-vs-wide-scale   larix-chinensis   larix-decidua   larix-eurolepis   larix-gmelinii   larix-kaempferi   larix-leptolepis   larix-lyallii   larix-marschlinsii   larix-occidentalis   larix-olgensis   larix-sibirica   larix-spp   last-glacial-maximum   last-interglacial   late-mesolithic   late-quaternary   latex   lathyrus-aureus   latitude   latvia   laurus-azorica   laurus-nobilis   laurus-spp   layer   leaf   leaf-analysis   leaf-area   leaf-area-index   leaf-dry-weight   leaf-growth   leaf-litter-processing   leaf-respiration   leaf-senescence   leaf-thickness   leaf-traits   learning-strategies   lecanosticta-acicola   lecointea-amazonica   legal-issues   legislation   lepidoptera   leptographium-spp   leucaena-leucocephala   leucoma-salicis   library   license--cc-by-2-0   license--cc-by-3-0   license--cc-by-4-0   license--cc0-1-0   license--open-government-licence-v3   license--public-domain   license-gnu-gpl   licensing   lichens   lidar   life-science   light-availability   light-response   lignification   lignin   ligustrum-spp   ligustrum-vulgare   limited-flexibility-ecosystem   limiting-factor   lines-of-code   linnaea-borealis   linux-kernel   liquidambar-orientalis  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Tolerance to shade, drought, and waterlogging of temperate northern hemisphere trees and shrubs

  
Ecological Monographs, Vol. 76, No. 4. (November 2006), pp. 521-547, https://doi.org/10.1890/0012-9615(2006)076[0521:ttsdaw]2.0.co;2

Abstract

Lack of information on ecological characteristics of species across different continents hinders development of general world-scale quantitative vegetation dynamic models. We constructed common scales of shade, drought, and waterlogging tolerance for 806 North American, European/West Asian, and East Asian temperate shrubs and trees representing about 40% of the extant natural Northern Hemisphere species pool. These scales were used to test the hypotheses that shade tolerance is negatively related to drought and waterlogging tolerances, and that these correlations vary among continents and ...

 

Know your limits – The need for better data on species responses to soil variables

  
Basic and Applied Ecology, Vol. 16, No. 7. (November 2015), pp. 563-572, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2015.08.010

Abstract

Species distribution modelling has largely focused on larger spatial scales and the significance of climatic variables for future species ranges. In this study, we argue that more attention should be paid to local processes and the responses of species along soil gradients, as habitat destruction and change in terms of an altered edaphic environment are the main factors behind the decline of many plant species in Central Europe. Examples from deciduous forests and calcareous dry grasslands show that response optima and ...

 

A MODIS-based global 1-km maximum green vegetation fraction dataset

  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 53, No. 8. (21 May 2014), pp. 1996-2004, https://doi.org/10.1175/jamc-d-13-0356.1

Abstract

Global land-cover data are widely used in regional and global models because land cover influences land–atmosphere exchanges of water, energy, momentum, and carbon. Many models use data of maximum green vegetation fraction (MGVF) to describe vegetation abundance. MGVF products have been created in the past using different methods, but their validation with ground sites is difficult. Furthermore, uncertainty is introduced because many products use a single year of satellite data. In this study, a global 1-km MGVF product is developed on ...

Visual summary

  • Caption: [Excerpt from the article] Green vegetation fraction (GVF; Deardorff 1978) is widely used in global models [...] Along with leaf area index (LAI; Myneni et al. 2002), GVF is used to describe the abundance of vegetation in most global models [...] The Community Land Model (CLM; Lawrence and Chase 2007) currently uses estimates of maximum GVF from ‘‘Continuous Fields’’ (CF) data that are based on measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging
 

Climate change impacts in European forests: the expert views of local observers

  
Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 71, No. 2. (2014), pp. 131-137, https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-013-0280-1

Abstract

[Excerpt] Forests respond differently to changes in climate depending on individual site characteristics and tree status. Site conditions may buffer or boost impacts of heat, drought, and storm events. Considering contemporary changes in climate (Christensen et al. 2007), warming may increase forest productivity in those parts of Europe where growth resources like soil water are not limiting (Nabuurs et al. 2002). However, under conditions of limited resource supply and changed disturbance regime, we may expect a reduction of forest productivity and ...

 

Response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to soil and atmospheric water deficits under Mediterranean mountain climate

  
Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 65, No. 3. (2008), pp. 306-306, https://doi.org/10.1051/forest%3a2008003

Abstract

The physiological responses to water deficits of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) were studied under Mediterranean mountain climate. Minimum leaf water potentials were −3.2 MPa for oak and −2.1 MPa for pine, with higher predawn values for pubescent oak. Relative sap flow declined in both species when vapour pressure deficit (D) went above ca. 1.2 kPa, but stomatal control was stronger for pine during the 2003 summer drought. P. sylvestris plant hydraulic conductance on a ...

 

Constraints and trade-offs in Mediterranean plant communities: The case of holm oak-Aleppo pine forests

  
The Botanical Review, Vol. 66, No. 1. (2000), pp. 119-149, https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02857785

Abstract

In this paper we review those aspects that are relevant to the development of a mechanistic ecological theory to account for the structure and dynamics of Mediterranean forests, focusing our attention on mixed forests of holm oak (Quercus ilex L.), a shade-tolerant, slowgrowing species that resprouts vigorously after disturbance, and Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.), a fast-growing, nonresprouting, shade-intolerant species. The main objectives of this report are: to introduce some of the primary features of these forests, showing their structural complexity ...

 

Reproduction of olive tree habitat suitability for global change impact assessment

  
Ecological Modelling, Vol. 218, No. 1-2. (October 2008), pp. 95-109, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2008.06.024

Abstract

The olive tree is so typical of the Mediterranean climate that its presence in a territory qualifies the climate of this as Mediterranean. Many clues indicated that in the past olive cultivation limits moved northward or southward in the Northern Hemisphere according to warmer or cooler climate, respectively. This makes the olive tree cultivation area a possible biological indicator of changes in climate and the identification of the climatological parameters that limit its cultivation plays an important role for climate change ...

 

Influence of root temperature on growth of Pinus sylvestris, Fagus sylvatica, Tilia cordata and Quercus robur

  
In Trees, Vol. 9, No. 4. (1995), pp. 220-223, https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00195276

Abstract

One-year-old tree seedlings were incubated in a greenhouse from April to July, under natural daylight conditions, with their root systems at constant temperatures of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 °C and with the above ground parts kept at a constant air temperature of 18–20 °C. The course of height growth, total mass increment, root, shoot and leaf weight as well as leaf areas were measured. The results indicate that clear differences exist in the optimal root zone temperatures ...

 

Process-based modeling of species' distributions: What limits temperate tree species' range boundaries?

  
Ecology, Vol. 88, No. 9. (September 2007), pp. 2280-2291, https://doi.org/10.1890/06-1591.1

Abstract

Niche-based models are widely used to understand what environmental factors determine species' distributions, but they do not provide a clear framework to study the processes involved in defining species' ranges. Here we used a process-based model to identify these processes and to assess the potential distribution of 17 North American boreal/temperate tree species. Using input of only climate and soil properties, the model reproduced the 17 species' distributions accurately. Our results allowed us to identify the climatic factors as well as ...

 

Tree mineral nutrition is deteriorating in Europe

  
Global Change Biology (1 June 2014), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12657

Abstract

The response of forest ecosystems to increased atmospheric CO2 is constrained by nutrient availability. It is thus crucial to account for nutrient limitation when studying the forest response to climate change. The objectives of this study were to describe the nutritional status of the main European tree species, to identify growth limiting nutrients and to assess changes in tree nutrition during the past two decades. We analysed the foliar nutrition data collected during 1992-2009 on the intensive forest monitoring plots of ...

 

Physiological minimum temperatures for root growth in seven common European broad-leaved tree species

  
Tree Physiology, Vol. 34, No. 3. (01 March 2014), pp. 302-313, https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpu003

Abstract

Temperature is the most important factor driving the cold edge distribution limit of temperate trees. Here, we identified the minimum temperatures for root growth in seven broad-leaved tree species, compared them with the species' natural elevational limits and identified morphological changes in roots produced near their physiological cold limit. Seedlings were exposed to a vertical soil-temperature gradient from 20 to 2 °C along the rooting zone for 18 weeks. In all species, the bulk of roots was produced at temperatures above 5 °C. However, ...

 

Oak seedling survival and growth along resource gradients in Mediterranean forests: implications for regeneration in current and future environmental scenarios

  
Oikos, Vol. 117, No. 11. (28 October 2008), pp. 1683-1699, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2008.16814.x

Abstract

Understanding seedling performance across resource gradients is crucial for defining the regeneration niche of plant species under current environmental conditions and for predicting potential changes under a global change scenario. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to determine how seedling survival and growth of two evergreen and two deciduous Quercus species vary along gradients of light and soil properties in two Mediterranean forests with contrasting soils and climatic conditions. Half the seedlings were subjected to an irrigation treatment during the first ...

 

Shortage of nutrients and excess of toxic elements in soils limit the distribution of soil-sensitive tree species in temperate forests

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 297 (June 2013), pp. 94-107, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.02.008

Abstract

A sound knowledge of the soil properties required by tree species is a prerequisite for addressing many practical and scientific issues such as forest management or the predictive mapping of tree species. To date, such knowledge has been derived mainly from laboratory experiments and from case studies in the field. The importance of soils for the distribution of tree species has, however, hardly been tested systematically with comprehensive data including climate, soil and vegetation inventories.In our study, we analysed a comprehensive ...

 

Ecosystems Say 'Pass the Salt!'

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6170. (31 January 2014), pp. 472-473, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.343.6170.472

Abstract

In sodium-poor soil, a University of Oklahoma ecologist has found, small amounts of added salt boost invertebrate biomass and increase decomposition—so much so, his latest work suggests, that a lack of salt could have a major impact on the global carbon cycle. Not everyone agrees about its potential effect on the carbon cycle, but through his work he has convinced many of his colleagues that salt is critical to the well-being of an ecosystem. ...

 

Poleward expansion of mangroves is a threshold response to decreased frequency of extreme cold events

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 2. (30 January 2013), pp. 201315800-727, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1315800111

Abstract

[Significance] Coastal mangrove forests support a diverse array of associated species and provide ecosystem services to human communities. Mangroves cannot tolerate extreme freezing temperatures and so are generally limited to tropical environments. However, climate change in the form of increasing temperatures has the potential to facilitate increases in mangrove abundance near tropical–temperate transition zones. Here, we use 28 y of satellite imagery to demonstrate that increases in mangrove area have already occurred along the northeast coast of Florida. These increases correspond ...

 

Did soil development limit spruce (Picea abies) expansion in the Central Alps during the Holocene? Testing a palaeobotanical hypothesis with a dynamic landscape model

  
Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 38, No. 5. (May 2011), pp. 933-949, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2010.02460.x

Abstract

Aim  Forest communities in the European Central Alps are highly sensitive to climatic change. Palaeobotanical studies have demonstrated that forests rapidly expanded upslope during Holocene warm intervals and contracted when temperatures fell. However, temperature alone cannot account for important changes in tree species abundance. For example, population expansion by Norway spruce (Picea abies), a dominant subalpine species, lagged suitable temperatures by about 3000 years in eastern and by 6000 years in western Switzerland. We hypothesize that spruce expansion was delayed by limited water ...

 

Impact of vertebrate acorn- and seedling-predators on a Mediterranean Quercus pyrenaica forest

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 180, No. 1-3. (17 July 2003), pp. 125-134, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(02)00608-4

Abstract

We have experimentally investigated the impact of biotic factors, acting at the seed and seedling stages, on a Quercus pyrenaica forest in the Sierra Nevada mountains (SE Spain). We monitored the natural establishment of the oak for 3 years in two forest plots and two shrubland plots, by counting seedlings and juveniles. In addition, we established several experiments in these plots to examine acorn and seedling survival, while also considering the microhabitat effect on survival probability. Dispersed acorns were quickly consumed ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/limiting-factor

Publication metadata

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.