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Selection: with tag integrated-natural-resources-modelling-and-management [91 articles] 

 

Risk of post-fire metal mobilization into surface water resources: a review

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 599-600 (December 2017), pp. 1740-1755, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.096

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Forest catchment supply high quality water to a number of communities around the world. [::] Forest fire release sequestered metals from soil organic matter and vegetation. [::] Post-fire erosion rapidly transports these metals to downstream soil and water bodies. [::] Their deposition in the water bodies affects the water quality and aquatic biota. [::] This metal contamination may reach to human being as a consumer. [Abstract] One of the significant economic benefits to communities around the world of having pristine forest catchments is the supply of ...

 

At the nexus of fire, water and society

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (23 May 2016), 20150172, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0172

Abstract

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the effects of fire on the predicted water scarcity and declines in water quality? Drinking water supplies for humans, the emphasis of this exploration, are derived from several land cover types, including forests, grasslands and peatlands, which are vulnerable to fire. In the last two ...

 

A global index for mapping the exposure of water resources to wildfire

  
Forests, Vol. 7, No. 1. (13 January 2016), 22, https://doi.org/10.3390/f7010022

Abstract

Wildfires are keystone components of natural disturbance regimes that maintain ecosystem structure and functions, such as the hydrological cycle, in many parts of the world. Consequently, critical surface freshwater resources can be exposed to post-fire effects disrupting their quantity, quality and regularity. Although well studied at the local scale, the potential extent of these effects has not been examined at the global scale. We take the first step toward a global assessment of the wildfire water risk (WWR) by presenting a ...

 

A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: beyond drought effects

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 148 (January 2017), pp. 42-54, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.11.012

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Different global change factors combine causing unprecedented ecological effects. [::] Much more complex interactions arise when combinations occur together. [::] Drought should be considered when designing and applying management policies. [::] Conserving Mediterranean terrestrial ecosystems is a collective effort. [Abstract] Climate change, alteration of atmospheric composition, land abandonment in some areas and land use intensification in others, wildfires and biological invasions threaten forests, shrublands and pastures all over the world. However, the impacts of the combinations between global change factors are not well understood despite ...

 

Climate change impact modelling needs to include cross-sectoral interactions

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 6, No. 9. (23 May 2016), pp. 885-890, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3039

Abstract

Climate change impact assessments often apply models of individual sectors such as agriculture, forestry and water use without considering interactions between these sectors. This is likely to lead to misrepresentation of impacts, and consequently to poor decisions about climate adaptation. However, no published research assesses the differences between impacts simulated by single-sector and integrated models. Here we compare 14 indicators derived from a set of impact models run within single-sector and integrated frameworks across a range of climate and socio-economic scenarios ...

 

Resources

  
In The development dictionary: a guide to knowledge as power (2010), pp. 228-242
edited by Wolfgang Sachs

Abstract

[Excerpt] ‘Resource’ originally implied life. Its root is the Latin verb surgere, which evoked the image of a spring that continually rises from the ground. Like a spring, a ‘re-source’ rises again and again, even if it has repeatedly been used and consumed. The concept thus highlighted nature’s power of self-regeneration and called attention to her prodigious creativity. Moreover, it implied an ancient idea about the relationship between humans and nature: that the earth bestows gifts on humans who, in turn, are well advised to show diligence in ...

 

Current research issues related to post-wildfire runoff and erosion processes

  
Earth-Science Reviews, Vol. 122 (July 2013), pp. 10-37, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2013.03.004

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Develop an organizational framework for post-wildfire response in different regions. [::] Soil properties are a critical link between infiltration, runoff, and erosion. [::] Need mathematical relations between burn severity metrics and soil properties. [::] Determine physical-based precipitation metrics that best predict runoff and erosion. [::] Incorporate basin morphology in runoff models for steep, rough channels. [Abstract] Research into post-wildfire effects began in the United States more than 70 years ago and only later extended to other parts of the world. Post-wildfire responses are typically transient, episodic, ...

 

Increased wind erosion from forest wildfire: implications for contaminant-related risks

  
Journal of Environment Quality, Vol. 35, No. 2. (2 February 2006), pp. 468-478, https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2005.0112

Abstract

Assessments of contaminant-related human and ecological risk require estimation of transport rates, but few data exist on wind-driven transport rates in nonagricultural systems, particularly in response to ecosystem disturbances such as forest wildfire and also relative to water-driven transport. The Cerro Grande wildfire in May of 2000 burned across ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P.&C. Lawson var. scopulorum Englem.) forest within Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico, where contaminant transport and associated post-fire inhalation risks are of concern. ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 17

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: humidity   humus   hungary   hura-crepitans   hybrid-poplars   hybridisation   hydraulic-conductivity   hydraulic-properties   hydrogeology   hydrology   hydropower-energy   hylastes-cunicularius   hylobius-abietis   hylurgops-palliatus   hymenaea-courbaril   hymenoscyphus-pseudoalbidus   hyper-heuristics   hyphantria-cunea   hypoglycin-a   hypoxylon-mediterraneum   hypsipyla-robusta   iatrogenic-problem   iberian-peninsula   iberian-region   ica   ice-cover   ice-sheet   iceland   idl   ieee   iland   ilarvirus   ilex-aquifolium   ilex-spp   illyrian   ilwis   image-processing-analysis   impact   impact-factor   impacts   impatiens-spp   importance   in-situ-conservation   in-vitro-culture   inaction   inbreeding   incompatibility   incomplete-knowledge   incongruity   india   indian-ocean   indicator-species   indicators   indices   individual-emissions   indonedia   industry   inequality   infiltration   information   information-systems   information-technology-benefits   infrastructure   initial-conditions   innovation   inrmm   inrmm-list-of-tags   inrmm-relationship-schemata   insect-outbreak   insect-outbreaks   insect-resistance   insects   inspire   instability   insurance   integral-modelling   integral-quality-index   integrated-biodiversity-observation-system   integrated-modelling   integrated-natural-resources-modelling-and-management   integrated-water-resources-management   integration-constraints   integration-techniques   intelligence   inter-specific-crossing   interactions   interception-capacity   interdisciplinary-research   interglacial   international-trade   interoperability   interval-analysis   interview   intra-specific-crossing   intractable-problem   intraspecific-differentiation   intraspecific-variation   introduction   introgression  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Sustainable land use in the European Union

  
CULTIVAR Cadernos de Análise e Prospetiva, Vol. 2 (2015), pp. 13-20

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] Soil is defined as the top layer of the earth’s crust. It is formed by mineral particles, organic matter, water, air and living organisms. In fact, soil is an extremely complex, variable and living medium. It can be considered essentially as a non-renewable resource since soil formation is an extremely slow process. Soil provides us with food, biomass and raw materials. It serves as a platform for human activities and landscape. It is also an archive of heritage and plays ...

References

  1. European Commission, 2006. Commission staff working document - Document accompanying the Communication from the Commission to the Council, The European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection - Impact assessment of the thematic strategy on soil protection. Commission Staff Working Document 2006 (SEC/2006/0620).
  2. Fenn, T., Fleet, D., Garrett, L., Daly, E., Elding, C., Hartman, M., Udo, J., 2014. Study on Economic and
 

European atlas of forest tree species

  
Keywords: bioeconomy   chorology   classification   climate   constrained-spatial-multi-frequency-analysis   data-heterogeneity   data-integration   data-uncertainty   disasters   disturbances   ecological-zones   ecology   ecosystem-services   europe   floods   forest-fires   forest-pests   forest-resources   free-software   geospatial   geospatial-semantic-array-programming   gis   gnu-bash   gnu-linux   gnu-octave   habitat-suitability   integrated-modelling   integrated-natural-resources-modelling-and-management   integration-techniques   knowledge-integration   landslides   mastrave-modelling-library   modelling-uncertainty   open-data   paleoecology   relative-distance-similarity   reproducible-research   review   science-policy-interface   science-society-interface   semantic-array-programming   semantic-constraints   semantics   semap   software-uncertainty   soil-erosion   soil-resources   species-distribution   tree-species   uncertainty   water-resources   windstorm  

Abstract

[Excerpt] The European Atlas of Forest Tree Species is the first comprehensive publication of such a unique and essential environmental resource, that is, our trees. Leading scientists and forestry professionals have contributed in the many stages of the production of this atlas, through the collection of ground data on the location of tree species, elaboration of the distribution and suitability maps, production of the photographic material and compilation of the different chapters. The European Atlas of Forest Tree Species is both ...

 

Green paper on forest protection and information in the EU: preparing forests for climate change

  
COM Documents, Vol. 2010, No. COM/2010/0066 final. (1 March 2010)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] The purpose of this Green Paper is to launch the debate on options for a European Union (EU) approach to forest protection and information in the framework of the EU Forest Action Plan, as announced by the Commission in the White Paper "Adapting to Climate Change: towards a European Framework for action"[1]. The Council conclusions of 25 June 2009 on this White Paper underlined that climate change has had and will have an impact, inter alia, on forests. As these ...

 

Commission staff working document - impact assessment, Part 1 accompanying the document: Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - An EU strategy on adaptation to climate change

  
Commission Staff Working Document, Vol. 2013, No. SWD/2013/0132 final. (16 April 2013)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Climate change and the need for adaptation] The increase in global surface temperature is the most obvious aspect of anthropogenic climate change. The average temperature for the European land area for the last decade (2002-2011) is 1.3°C above the preindustrial average, which makes the increase over Europe faster than the global average. Moreover, significant economic losses[6] and human fatalities associated with extreme weather events, such as heat waves, droughts and heavy precipitation, have been registered. [\n] Climate change will continue for ...

 

Rainfall infiltration and soil hydrological characteristics below ancient forest, planted forest and grassland in a temperate northern climate

  
Ecohydrology (2015), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.1002/eco.1658

Abstract

How rainfall infiltration rate and soil hydrological characteristics develop over time under forests of different ages in temperate regions is poorly understood. In this study, infiltration rate and soil hydrological characteristics were investigated under forests of different ages and under grassland. Soil hydraulic characteristics were measured at different scales under a 250-year-old grazed grassland (GL), 6-year-old (6yr) and 48-year-old (48yr) Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) plantations, remnant 300-year-old individual Scots pine (OT) and a 4000-year-old Caledonian Forest (AF). In situ field-saturated hydraulic ...

 

An indicator framework for assessing ecosystem services in support of the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020

  
Ecosystem Services, Vol. 17 (February 2016), pp. 14-23, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2015.10.023

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] EU Member states have to map and assess ecosystems and their services (MAES). [::] We present the MAES conceptual model which links biodiversity to human wellbeing. [::] Typologies of ecosystems and their services ensure comparability across countries. [::] We present a list of indicators that can be used for national MAES assessments. [::] We critically discuss the data gaps and challenges of the MAES typologies. [Abstract] In the EU, the mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services, abbreviated to MAES, is seen as a key ...

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Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES): Consultation on Version 4, August-December 2012

  
(2013)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive Summary] [:1] This Report documents the development of a Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES), following the most recent round of consultation between August and December 2012. [:2] We confirm the need to frame the Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES) around human needs, and recommend that CICES is regarded primarily as a way of describing ecosystem outputs as they directly contribute to human well-being, so that discussions about appropriate assessment frameworks (economic, social, aesthetic and moral) can take ...

 

Water-quality impacts from climate-induced forest die-off

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 3. (28 October 2012), pp. 218-222, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1724

Abstract

Increased ecosystem susceptibility to pests and other stressors has been attributed to climate change, resulting in unprecedented tree mortality from insect infestations. In turn, large-scale tree die-off alters physical and biogeochemical processes, such as organic matter decay and hydrologic flow paths, that could enhance leaching of natural organic matter to soil and surface waters and increase potential formation of harmful drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Whereas previous studies have investigated water-quantity alterations due to climate-induced, forest die-off, impacts on water quality ...

 

Sustainable development - Natural resources

  
In Statistics Explained (2015), 4395

Abstract

This article provides an overview of statistical data on sustainable development in the area of natural resources. It is based on the set of sustainable development indicators the European Union (EU) agreed upon for monitoring its sustainable development strategy. This article is part of a set of statistical articles for monitoring sustainable development, which are based on the Eurostat publication 'Sustainable development in the European Union - 2015 monitoring report of the EU sustainable development strategy'. The report is published every ...

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Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management: minimal redefinition of a known challenge for environmental modelling

  
In Call for a shared research agenda toward scientific knowledge freedom (2012)

Abstract

[Excerpt] How do we interpret and cope with the complex challenges of the changing global environment, culture and society? Among the many ways to do so, a key perspective considers the possibilities and limits of our Earth system as a whole. Mankind exploits Earth's resources to live, increasingly altering incredibly complex systems of systems. Over the centuries, our influence has grown in intensity and pervasivity, spanning at multiple scales over ecology, climate, transport and connectivity even among far (and until recently ...

 

Natural capital and bioeconomy: challenges and opportunities for forestry

  
Annals of Silvicultural Research, Vol. 38, No. 2. (2014), https://doi.org/10.12899/asr-1013

Abstract

Over the last decades, the stock of natural capital has been globally reduced by human-induced effects such as climate change, and land use and cover modifications. In particular, the continuous flow of goods and services from ecosystems to people is currently under threat if the current human activities still remain unsustainable. The recent bioeconomy strategy is an important opportunity to halt the loss of biodiversity and the reduction of services provision, from global to local scale. In this framework, forest sector ...

 

Study of a collaborative repository of semantic metadata and models for regional environmental datasets' multivariate transformations

  
(2015)
edited by Giorgio Guariso

Abstract

A semantic modelling procedure is introduced to ease array-based multivariate transformations of public environmental data, along with the architecture of a collaborative repository of modelling meta-information based on the procedure. [\n] The procedure, Semantic Array Programming (SemAP), is intended as a lightweight paradigm to support integrated natural resources modelling and management (INRMM), in the context of wide-scale transdisciplinary modelling for environment (WSTMe, here tested from catchment up to regional and continental scale). [\n] It is a common experience among computational scientists, ...

References

  1. Aalde, H., Gonzalez, P., Gytarsky, M., Krug, T., Kurz, W. A., Ogle, S., Raison, J., Schoene, D., Ravindranath, N. H., Elhassan, N. G., Heath, L. S., Higuchi, N., Kainja, S., Matsumoto, M., Sanz Sánchez, M. J., Somogyi, Z., 2006. Forest Land. Vol. 4 of IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, Prepared by the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Ch. 4, 83 pp. http://www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/2006gl/pdf/4_Volume4/V4_04_Ch4_Forest_Land.pdf .
 

Temperate forest health in an era of emerging megadisturbance

  
Science, Vol. 349, No. 6250. (21 August 2015), pp. 823-826, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaa9933

Abstract

Although disturbances such as fire and native insects can contribute to natural dynamics of forest health, exceptional droughts, directly and in combination with other disturbance factors, are pushing some temperate forests beyond thresholds of sustainability. Interactions from increasing temperatures, drought, native insects and pathogens, and uncharacteristically severe wildfire are resulting in forest mortality beyond the levels of 20th-century experience. Additional anthropogenic stressors, such as atmospheric pollution and invasive species, further weaken trees in some regions. Although continuing climate change will likely ...

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Forest health and global change

  
Science, Vol. 349, No. 6250. (21 August 2015), pp. 814-818, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aac6759

Abstract

Humans rely on healthy forests to supply energy, building materials, and food and to provide services such as storing carbon, hosting biodiversity, and regulating climate. Defining forest health integrates utilitarian and ecosystem measures of forest condition and function, implemented across a range of spatial scales. Although native forests are adapted to some level of disturbance, all forests now face novel stresses in the form of climate change, air pollution, and invasive pests. Detecting how intensification of these stresses will affect the ...

 

Boreal forests, aerosols and the impacts on clouds and climate

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 366, No. 1885. (28 December 2008), pp. 4613-4626, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2008.0201

Abstract

Previous studies have concluded that boreal forests warm the climate because the cooling from storage of carbon in vegetation and soils is cancelled out by the warming due to the absorption of the Sun's heat by the dark forest canopy. However, these studies ignored the impacts of forests on atmospheric aerosol. We use a global atmospheric model to show that, through emission of organic vapours and the resulting condensational growth of newly formed particles, boreal forests double regional cloud condensation nuclei ...

 

Precipitation–vegetation coupling and its influence on erosion on the Loess Plateau, China

  
CATENA, Vol. 64, No. 1. (30 November 2005), pp. 103-116, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2005.07.004

Abstract

The relationships between precipitation, vegetation and erosion are important and are unsolved issues in the field of earth surface processes. Based on data from the Loess Plateau of China, some non-linear relationships between forest cover (Cf), mean annual rainfall erosivity (Re) and annual precipitation (Pm) have been found. A threshold has been identified at Pm = 450 mm, that is, when Pm is < 450 mm, Cf is low and basically does not vary with Pm; when Pm exceeds 450 mm, Cf increases rapidly. ...

 

Eluding catastrophic shifts

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 15. (14 April 2015), pp. E1828-E1836, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1414708112

Abstract

[Significance] Catastrophic shifts such as desertification processes, massive extinctions, or stock market collapses are ubiquitous threats in nature and society. In these events, there is a shift from one steady state to a radically different one, from which recovery is exceedingly difficult. Thus, there is a huge interest in predicting and eventually preventing catastrophic shifts. Here we explore the influence of key mechanisms such as demographic fluctuations, heterogeneity, and diffusion, which appear generically in real circumstances. The mechanisms we study could ideally ...

 

A web accessible environmental model base: a tool for natural resources management

  
In MODSIM 1997 International Congress on Modelling and Simulation Proceedings (1997), pp. 657-663

Abstract

An environmental model base, accessible via the World-Wide Web, is presented. The information stored in this model base can be retrieved using various methods such as structured queries, full text search, exact and approximate keyword search. These search tools help the environmental modeller to find a suitable model to solve their modelling problem. The modeller is then presented with a set of information, regarding the models matching the query, including source and executable code, user manuals, and references to supplemental documentation. ...

References

  1. Abel, D.J., K. L. Taylor, D. Kuo, Integrating modelling systems for environmental management infomuttion systems, ACM Sigmod, 26(1), 1997a.
  2. Abel, D.J., V. Garde, K. L Taylor, X. Zhou, SMART: towards Internet marketplaces, Technical Report, CSIRO Mathematical and Information Sciences, Canberra, Australia, 1997b.
  3. Ba, S., R. Kalakota, A.B. Whinston. Using client-broker-server architecture for Intranet decision support. . Decision Support Systems, 19(3), 1997.
  4. Berners-Lee, T., R. CaiHatt, A.
 

Under the radar: mitigating enigmatic ecological impacts

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 29, No. 11. (November 2014), pp. 635-644, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2014.09.003

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] There are ecological impacts that are overlooked by standard impact evaluations. [::] These ‘enigmatic’ impacts can be cumulative, offsite, cryptic, or secondary. [::] Enigmatic impacts can act synergistically and are hard to detect and mitigate. [::] Potential solutions include strategic assessments and insurance schemes. [Abstract] Identifying the deleterious ecological effects of developments, such as roads, mining, and urban expansion, is essential for informing development decisions and identifying appropriate mitigation actions. However, there are many types of ecological impacts that slip ‘under the radar’ of conventional ...

 

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions. Innovating for Sustainable Growth: A Bioeconomy for Europe

  
No. COM(2012) 60 final. (2012)

Abstract

[Excerpt] A bioeconomy strategy for Europe In order to cope with an increasing global population, rapid depletion of many resources, increasing environmental pressures and climate change, Europe needs to radically change its approach to production, consumption, processing, storage, recycling and disposal of biological resources. The Europe 2020 Strategy calls for a bioeconomy as a key element for smart and green growth in Europe. Advancements in bioeconomy research and innovation uptake will allow Europe to improve the management of its renewable biological ...

 

Watering the forest for the trees: an emerging priority for managing water in forest landscapes

  
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 11, No. 6. (08 August 2013), pp. 314-321, https://doi.org/10.1890/120209

Abstract

Widespread threats to forests resulting from drought stress are prompting a re-evaluation of priorities for water management on forest lands. In contrast to the widely held view that forest management should emphasize providing water for downstream uses, we argue that maintaining forest health in the context of a changing climate may require focusing on the forests themselves and on strategies to reduce their vulnerability to increasing water stress. Management strategies would need to be tailored to specific landscapes but could include ...

 

Species selection for soil reinforcement and protection

  
In Slope Stability and Erosion Control: Ecotechnological Solutions (2008), pp. 167-210, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6676-4_6

Abstract

Species selection is vitally important for ensuring the success of any ecotechnological solution that may be employed on a particular site. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the engineer with a database of plant species that are suitable for both soil and slope stability by either mechanical or hydrological means, i.e., anchoring and buttressing of deep tap roots; bank and channel reinforcement; deep reinforcement and soil strength enhancement; removing soil moisture, surface protection, shallow reinforcement and erosion control. Protection ...

 

Watershed and forest management for landslide risk reduction

  
In Landslides – Disaster Risk Reduction (2009), pp. 633-649, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-69970-5_33

Abstract

Landslide hazard can be influenced by natural resource management and rural development related activities, such as forest management, road construction, agricultural practices and river management. Vegetation cover and its utilizations may play a role in mitigating the risk of landsliding. Moreover and above all, it does play a role in mitigating the processes leading to increased landslide hazard, such as gully erosion. Thus, forest management and development are of particular concern. But all people living in mountain areas rely on the ...

 

Architecture of Environmental Risk Modelling: for a faster and more robust response to natural disasters

  
In 3rd Conference of Computational Interdisciplinary Sciences (2014), pp. 46-57

Abstract

Demands on the disaster response capacity of the European Union are likely to increase, as the impacts of disasters continue to grow both in size and frequency. This has resulted in intensive research on issues concerning spatially-explicit information and modelling and their multiple sources of uncertainty. Geospatial support is one of the forms of assistance frequently required by emergency response centres along with hazard forecast and event management assessment. Robust modelling of natural hazards requires dynamic simulations under an array of ...

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Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 27. (08 July 2014), pp. 9757-9761, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1317323111

Abstract

[Significance] The projected increase in warm extremes associated with climate change is a major concern for society and represents a threat to humans and ecosystems. This study shows that heat wave impacts could be attenuated locally by increasing surface albedo through crop residue management (no-till farming). This is due to an identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature distribution resulting in a much stronger influence on hot extremes than on mean temperatures. This finding has important implications for ...

 

Managing complex adaptive systems - A co-evolutionary perspective on natural resource management

  
Ecological Economics, Vol. 63, No. 1. (15 June 2007), pp. 9-21, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.12.014

Abstract

The overexploitation of natural resources and the increasing number of social conflicts following from their unsustainable use point to a wide gap between the objectives of sustainability and current resource management practices. One of the reasons for the difficulties to close this gap is that for evolving complex systems like natural and socio-economic systems, sustainability cannot be a static objective. Instead sustainable development is an open evolutionary process of improving the management of social-ecological systems, through better understanding and knowledge. Therefore, ...

 

Risk management in a dynamic society: a modelling problem

  
Safety Science, Vol. 27, No. 2-3. (November 1997), pp. 183-213, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0925-7535(97)00052-0

Abstract

In spite of all efforts to design safer systems, we still witness severe, large-scale accidents. A basic question is: Do we actually have adequate models of accident causation in the present dynamic society? The socio-technical system involved in risk management includes several levels ranging from legislators, over managers and work planners, to system operators. This system is presently stressed by a fast pace of technological change, by an increasingly aggressive, competitive environment, and by changing regulatory practices and public pressure. Traditionally, ...

 

Framework for participative reflection on the accomplishment of transdisciplinary research programs

  
Environmental Science & Policy, Vol. 13, No. 8. (22 December 2010), pp. 733-741, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2010.08.002

Abstract

In response to the increasingly complex social–ecological issues facing society, there is a growing trend to conduct environmental research in large collaborative programs. This approach is described as transdisciplinary research as it transcends formal disciplinary boundaries, explicitly acknowledges that many different perspectives are relevant to the resolution of complex problems, and actively involves the users of research. This poses challenges for the evaluation of “impact” as any evaluation process must take into consideration the different expectations, values, culture, language and reward ...

 

The value of coordinated management of interacting ecosystem services

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 15, No. 6. (1 June 2012), pp. 509-519, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01773.x

Abstract

Coordinating decisions and actions among interacting sectors is a critical component of ecosystem-based management, but uncertainty about coordinated management’s effects is compromising its perceived value and use. We constructed an analytical framework for explicitly calculating how coordination affects management decisions, ecosystem state and the provision of ecosystem services in relation to ecosystem dynamics and socio-economic objectives. The central insight is that the appropriate comparison strategy to optimal coordinated management is optimal uncoordinated management, which can be identified at the game theoretic ...

 

Implementation of the IPCC SRES Scenario A1B with the Land Use Modelling Platform contribution to the JRC PESETA II project

  

Abstract

The Land Use Modelling Platform (LUMP) has been chosen to simulate land-use changes under a subset of scenarios (A1B). The modular structure of this platform, together with its high spatial resolution (100m), makes LUMP a suitable tool in the context of PESETAII. First, it guarantees high flexibility in adapting to the input/output interface required by the macro-economic models developed within this project. Moreover, an important added value to the modelling chain of PESETAII is the capability of taking into account specific ...

References

  1. Baruth, B., Genovese, G., Montanarella, L., (Eds). 2006. New soil information for the MARS Crop Yield Forecasting System. JRC Report. ISBN 92-79-03376-X.
  2. Batista e Silva F., Koomen E., Diogo V., Lavalle C., 2013. Estimating demand for industrial and commercial land use given economic forecasts. PLOS ONE. In review.
  3. Batista e Silva, F., Lavalle, C., Koomen, E., 2013. A procedure to obtain a refined European land use/cover map. Journal of Land Use
 

On the Role of Climate Forcing by Volcanic Sulphate and Volcanic Ash

  
Advances in Meteorology, Vol. 2014 (2014), pp. 1-17, https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/340123

Abstract

There is overall agreement that volcanic sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere can reduce solar radiation reaching the earth’s surface for years, thereby reducing surface temperatures, affecting global circulation patterns and generally the global climate system. However, the response of the climate system after large volcanic eruptions is not fully understood and global climate models have difficulties to reproduce the observed variability of the earth system after large volcanic eruptions until now. For geological timescales, it has been suggested that, in addition ...

 

Deforestation: Carving up the Amazon

  
Nature, Vol. 509, No. 7501. (21 May 2014), pp. 418-419, https://doi.org/10.1038/509418a

Abstract

A rash of road construction is causing widespread change in the world's largest tropical forest with potentially global consequences. [excerpt] The drying brought about by roads influences local atmospheric circulation patterns and can have farther-reaching effects that not only compromise the health of the Amazon but can also contribute to global warming by releasing carbon stored in the forest. [...] Stripping away trees not only eliminates a source of moisture; it also changes the regional air flow. As the forest dries, ...

 

Rethinking the contribution of drained and undrained grasslands to sediment-related water quality problems

  
Journal of Environment Quality, Vol. 37, No. 3. (1 May 2008), pp. 906-914, https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2007.0457

Abstract

Grass vegetation has been recommended for use in the prevention and control of soil erosion because of its dense sward characteristics and stabilizing effect on the soil. A general assumption is that grassland environments suffer from minimal soil erosion and therefore present little threat to the water quality of surface waters in terms of sediment and sorbed contaminant pollution. Our data question this assumption, reporting results from one hydrological year of observations on a field-experiment monitoring overland flow, drain flow, fluxes ...

 

Even for Slide-Prone Region, Landslide Was Off the Chart

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6179. (4 April 2014), pp. 16-17, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6179.16

Abstract

The rugged terrain inland of Seattle is prone to landslides. Yet the latest Oso landslide, which killed at least 27 people on 22 March, stands out as an anomaly. Calculations suggest that it flowed three times farther than slides of similar size and elevation drop, most likely due to the effect of heavy rains on the region's glacier-deposited soils. ...

 

Highly reduced mass loss rates and increased litter layer in radioactively contaminated areas

  
Oecologia In Oecologia (2014), pp. 1-9, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-014-2908-8

Abstract

The effects of radioactive contamination from Chernobyl on decomposition of plant material still remain unknown. We predicted that decomposition rate would be reduced in the most contaminated sites due to an absence or reduced densities of soil invertebrates. If microorganisms were the main agents responsible for decomposition, exclusion of large soil invertebrates should not affect decomposition. In September 2007 we deposited 572 bags with uncontaminated dry leaf litter from four species of trees in the leaf litter layer at 20 forest ...

 

Floods in a changing climate

  
(2012)

Abstract

"Flood risk management is presented in this book as a framework for identifying, assessing and prioritizing climate-related risks and developing appropriate adaptation responses. Rigorous assessment is employed to determine the available probabilistic and fuzzy set-based analytic tools, when each is appropriate and how to apply them to practical problems. Academic researchers in the fields of hydrology, climate change, environmental science and policy and risk assessment, and professionals and policy-makers working in hazard mitigation, water resources engineering and environmental economics, will find ...

 

Culturing the Forest

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6175. (07 March 2014), pp. 1078-1079, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1250655

Abstract

Examining the widespread resurgence of woodlands, the authors build a multifaceted view of forests as social-ecological systems. ...

 

Agri-environmental indicator - soil erosion

  
Statistics Explained In Agri-environmental indicators (2013)

Abstract

This article provides a fact sheet of the European Union (EU) agri-environmental indicator soil erosion. It consists of an overview of recent data, complemented by all information on definitions, measurement methods and context needed to interpret them correctly. The soil erosion article is part of a set of similar fact sheets providing a complete picture of the state of the agri-environmental indicators in the EU. The indicator soil erosion estimates the areas affected by a certain rate of soil erosion by ...

 

Software uncertainty in integrated environmental modelling: the role of semantics and open science

  
Geophysical Research Abstracts In European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2013, Vol. 15 (Nov 2013), 13292, https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.155701

Abstract

Computational aspects increasingly shape environmental sciences. Actually, transdisciplinary modelling of complex and uncertain environmental systems is challenging computational science (CS) and also the science-policy interface. Large spatial-scale problems falling within this category - i.e. wide-scale transdisciplinary modelling for environment (WSTMe) - often deal with factors for which deep-uncertainty may prevent usual statistical analysis of modelled quantities and need different ways for providing policy-making with science-based support. Here, practical recommendations are proposed for tempering a peculiar - not infrequently underestimated - source of uncertainty. Software errors in complex WSTMe may ...

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The nexus between integrated natural resources management and integrated water resources management in southern Africa

  
Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C, Vol. 33, No. 8-13. (January 2008), pp. 889-898, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pce.2008.06.044

Abstract

The low productivity of smallholder farming systems and enterprises in the drier areas of the developing world can be attributed mainly to the limited resources of farming households and the application of inappropriate skills and practices that can lead to the degradation of the natural resource base. This lack of development, particularly in southern Africa, is of growing concern from both an agricultural and environmental perspective. To address this lack of progress, two development paradigms that improve land and water productivity ...

 

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - A new EU forest strategy: for forests and the forest based sector

  
No. COM(2013) 659 final. (20 September 2013)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Guiding principles] [::] Sustainable forest management and the multifunctional role of forests, delivering multiple goods and services in a balanced way and ensuring forest protection; [::] Resource efficiency, optimising the contribution of forests and the forest sector to rural development, growth and job creation. [::] Global forest responsibility, promoting sustainable production and consumption of forest products. [\n] Europe has a long tradition of sustainable forest management, which is reflected in the FOREST EUROPE principles applied by Member States’ policies and supported ...

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