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Selection: with tag inequality [18 articles] 

 

Impact of population growth and population ethics on climate change mitigation policy

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 46. (14 November 2017), pp. 12338-12343, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1618308114

Abstract

[Significance] We investigate how future population growth is relevant to climate change policy. The answer depends importantly on ethical questions about whether our ultimate goal should be to increase the number of people who are happy or rather to increase the average level of people’s happiness. We calculate the best (optimal) emissions reduction pathway given each of these two different goals that society might have and calculate how much cheaper it would be to avoid dangerous interference with the climate given a ...

 

How population growth relates to climate change

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 46. (14 November 2017), pp. 12103-12105, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1717178114

Abstract

[Excerpt] Currently, around 7.5 billion people live on our planet and scenarios for the future show a plausible range from 8.5 to over 12 billion before the population will level off or start to decline, depending on the future course of fertility and mortality (1, 2). These people will also have to cope with the consequences of climate change that may be in the range of 1.5 °C to more than 3 °C, depending on the scale of mitigation efforts. The ...

 

Reboot for the AI revolution

  
Nature, Vol. 550, No. 7676. (17 October 2017), pp. 324-327, https://doi.org/10.1038/550324a

Abstract

As artificial intelligence puts many out of work, we must forge new economic, social and educational systems, argues Yuval Noah Harari. [Excerpt] The ongoing artificial-intelligence revolution will change almost every line of work, creating enormous social and economic opportunities — and challenges. Some believe that intelligent computers will push humans out of the job market and create a new 'useless class'; others maintain that automation will generate a wide range of new human jobs and greater prosperity for all. Almost everybody agrees ...

 

Meta-analysis of field experiments shows no change in racial discrimination in hiring over time

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 41. (10 October 2017), pp. 10870-10875, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1706255114

Abstract

[Significance] Many scholars have argued that discrimination in American society has decreased over time, while others point to persisting race and ethnic gaps and subtle forms of prejudice. The question has remained unsettled due to the indirect methods often used to assess levels of discrimination. We assess trends in hiring discrimination against African Americans and Latinos over time by analyzing callback rates from all available field experiments of hiring, capitalizing on the direct measure of discrimination and strong causal validity of these ...

 

Mapping indicators of female welfare at high spatial resolution

  
(2017)

Abstract

Improved understanding of geographic variation and inequity in health status, wealth, and access to resources within countries is increasingly being recognized as central to meeting development goals. Development and health indicators assessed at national scales conceal important inequities, with the rural poor often least well represented. High-resolution data on key social and health indicators are fundamental for targeting limited resources, especially where development funding has recently come under increased pressure. Globally, around 80% of countries regularly produce sex-disaggregated statistics at a ...

References

  1. Alegana, V.A., Atkinson, P.M., Pezzulo, C., Sorichetta, A., Weiss, D., Bird, T., ErbachSchoenberg, E., Tatem, A.J., 2015. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 12 (105), 20150073+. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2015.0073 .
  2. Banerjee, S., Gelfand, A.E., Polasek, W., 2000. Geostatistical modelling for spatial interaction data with application to postal service performance. Journal of statistical planning and inference 90(1), 87-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-3758(00)00111-7 .
 

Social status alters immune regulation and response to infection in macaques

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6315. (25 November 2016), pp. 1041-1045, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah3580

Abstract

[Status alters immune function in macaques] Rhesus macaques experience variable levels of stress on the basis of their position in the social hierarchy. To examine how stress affects immune function, Snyder-Mackler et al. manipulated the social status of individual macaques (see the Perspective by Sapolsky). Social status influenced the immune system at multiple levels, from immune cell numbers to gene expression, and altered signaling pathways in a model of response to infection. Macaques possess a plastic and adaptive immune response wherein social ...

 

Equality in maternal and newborn health: modelling geographic disparities in utilisation of care in five East African countries

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 8. (25 August 2016), e0162006, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162006

Abstract

Geographic accessibility to health facilities represents a fundamental barrier to utilisation of maternal and newborn health (MNH) services, driving historically hidden spatial pockets of localized inequalities. Here, we examine utilisation of MNH care as an emergent property of accessibility, highlighting high-resolution spatial heterogeneity and sub-national inequalities in receiving care before, during, and after delivery throughout five East African countries. We calculated a geographic inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility at 300 x 300 m using a dataset of 9,314 facilities ...

 

Growth mindset tempers the effects of poverty on academic achievement

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 31. (02 August 2016), pp. 8664-8668, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1608207113

Abstract

[Significance] This study is the first, to our knowledge, to show that a growth mindset (the belief that intelligence is not fixed and can be developed) reliably predicts achievement across a national sample of students, including virtually all of the schools and socioeconomic strata in Chile. It also explores the relationship between income and mindset for the first time, to our knowledge, finding that students from lower-income families were less likely to hold a growth mindset than their wealthier peers but that ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 17

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: humidity   humus   hungary   hura-crepitans   hybrid-poplars   hybridisation   hydraulic-conductivity   hydraulic-properties   hydrogeology   hydrology   hydropower-energy   hylastes-cunicularius   hylobius-abietis   hylurgops-palliatus   hymenaea-courbaril   hymenoscyphus-pseudoalbidus   hyper-heuristics   hyphantria-cunea   hypoglycin-a   hypoxylon-mediterraneum   hypsipyla-robusta   iatrogenic-problem   iberian-peninsula   iberian-region   ica   ice-cover   ice-sheet   iceland   idl   ieee   iland   ilarvirus   ilex-aquifolium   ilex-spp   illyrian   ilwis   image-processing-analysis   impact   impact-factor   impacts   impatiens-spp   importance   in-situ-conservation   in-vitro-culture   inaction   inbreeding   incompatibility   incomplete-knowledge   incongruity   india   indian-ocean   indicator-species   indicators   indices   individual-emissions   indonedia   industry   inequality   infiltration   information   information-systems   information-technology-benefits   infrastructure   initial-conditions   innovation   inrmm   inrmm-list-of-tags   inrmm-relationship-schemata   insect-outbreak   insect-outbreaks   insect-resistance   insects   inspire   instability   insurance   integral-modelling   integral-quality-index   integrated-biodiversity-observation-system   integrated-modelling   integrated-natural-resources-modelling-and-management   integrated-water-resources-management   integration-constraints   integration-techniques   intelligence   inter-specific-crossing   interactions   interception-capacity   interdisciplinary-research   interglacial   international-trade   interoperability   interval-analysis   interview   intra-specific-crossing   intractable-problem   intraspecific-differentiation   intraspecific-variation   introduction   introgression  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

How academia resembles a drug gang

  
In 8th Max Weber Programme Academic Careers Observatory Conference (2013), https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2407748

Abstract

Academic systems rely on the existence of a supply of “outsiders” ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail. Drawing on data from the US, Germany and the UK, this paper looks at how the academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders. ...

 

Universal education is key to enhanced climate adaptation

  
Science, Vol. 346, No. 6213. (28 November 2014), pp. 1061-1062, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1257975

Abstract

Over the coming years, enormous amounts of money will likely be spent on adaptation to climate change. The international community recently made pledges of up to $100 billion per year by 2020 for the Green Climate Fund. Judging from such climate finance to date, funding for large projects overwhelmingly goes to engineers to build seawalls, dams, or irrigation systems (1). But with specific projections of future changes in climate in specific locations still highly uncertain, such heavy concrete (in both meanings) ...

 

Out of Africa

  
Nature, Vol. 514, No. 7521. (7 October 2014), pp. 139-139, https://doi.org/10.1038/514139a

Abstract

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa must be shut down now, or the disease will continue to spread. [Excerpt] Ebola is out of control in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Although this has been the case since late spring, the international pledges of help have yet to translate into concerted, rapid action on the ground. The virus still has the upper hand. Between 23 September and 1 October alone, the number of cases rose from 6,500 to almost 7,500, according to ...

 

Inequality quantified: mind the gender gap

  
Nature, Vol. 495, No. 7439. (6 March 2013), pp. 22-24, https://doi.org/10.1038/495022a

Abstract

Despite improvements, female scientists continue to face discrimination, unequal pay and funding disparities. ...

 

What it takes

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6190. (20 June 2014), pp. 1422-1422, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6190.1422

Abstract

[Excerpt] Not long ago, Science Careers posted a widget—you can find it at http://scim.ag/1pwIaAF—that lets early-career scientists calculate the probability that they'll someday become principal investigators (PIs), on the basis of a few standard publication metrics. [...] The Science Careers widget is less accurate than the full-bore model, but it has the virtue of focusing attention on a handful of the most important parameters. [...] 1. Be male. The widget's probability plot displays two lines: red for women and blue for ...

 

The ancient roots of the 1%

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6186. (23 May 2014), pp. 822-825, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6186.822

Abstract

Researchers long blamed farming for the rise of inequality. They hypothesized that agriculture led to the production of surpluses and elites who controlled those surpluses. Now, archaeological and ethnographic analyses suggest that some ancient hunter-gatherers may have accumulated wealth by taking control of concentrated patches of wild foods. In this view, it is the ownership of small, resource-rich areas—rather than farming itself—that fosters inequality. ...

 

A world of difference

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6186. (23 May 2014), pp. 820-821, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6186.820

Abstract

Data show why inequality is a hot topic around the world. In the United States, the top 20% of earners take home a whopping 51% of income, and the share of income going to the top 1% has ballooned in the past 30 years, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the World Top Incomes Database. Yet U.S. incomes are more equal than those of many countries, such as South Africa and Brazil, while Norway and Sweden are bastions ...

 

What the numbers tell us

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6186. (23 May 2014), pp. 818-821, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6186.818

Abstract

[Excerpt] In 2011, the wrath of the 99% kindled Occupy movements around the world. The protests petered out, but in their wake an international conversation about inequality has arisen, with tens of thousands of speeches, articles, and blogs engaging everyone from President Barack Obama on down. Ideology and emotion drive much of the debate. But increasingly, the discussion is sustained by a tide of new data on the gulf between rich and poor. This special issue uses these fresh waves of data ...

 

Sharing global CO2 emission reductions among one billion high emitters

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 106, No. 29. (2009), pp. 11884-11888, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0905232106

Abstract

We present a framework for allocating a global carbon reduction target among nations, in which the concept of “common but differentiated responsibilities” refers to the emissions of individuals instead of nations. We use the income distribution of a country to estimate how its fossil fuel CO2 emissions are distributed among its citizens, from which we build up a global CO2 distribution. We then propose a simple rule to derive a universal cap on global individual emissions and find corresponding limits on ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inequality

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.