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Selection: with tag himalayan-region [12 articles] 

 

Temperature lapse rate in complex mountain terrain on the southern slope of the central Himalayas

  
Theoretical and Applied Climatology, Vol. 113, No. 3-4. (2013), pp. 671-682, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-012-0816-6

Abstract

This study presents the first results of monthly, seasonal and annual characteristics of temperature lapse rate on the southern slope of the central Himalayas, based on 20 years record of surface air temperature at 56 stations in Nepal. These stations are located at a range of elevations between 72 and 3,920 m above sea level. It is proven that the lapse rate can be calculated with a linear regression model. The annual cycle of temperature lapse rate exhibits a bi-modal pattern: ...

 

Why input matters: selection of climate data sets for modelling the potential distribution of a treeline species in the Himalayan region

  
Ecological Modelling, Vol. 359 (2017), pp. 92-102

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Generalized Linear Models were used to model the potential distribution of Betula utilis in the Himalayan region. [::] Evaluation of predictive ability between climate data sets derived from different statistical methods. [::] Comparison of ‘interpolated’ (i.e. WORLDCLIM) and ‘quasi-mechanistical statistical downscaling’ (i.e. CHELSA) climate data. [::] Models based CHELSA climate data had higher predictive power, WORLDCLIM consistently overpredicted the potential habitat. [::] Unmindful usage of climatic variables for environmental niche models may potentially cause misleading projections. [Abstract] Betula utilis is a major constituent of alpine treeline ...

 

Modelling the potential distribution of Betula utilis in the Himalaya

  
Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 11 (July 2017), pp. 69-83, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2017.04.003

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We modelled for the first time potential distribution of Betula utilis in the Himalayan mountains on a broad scale. [::] Two temperature and three precipitation variables are useful for predicting the current potential distribution of B. utilis. [::] We applied Generalized Linear Models and evaluated model performance using a multi-faceted approach. [::] Comparison between the current predictions and the distribution range decribed in the vegetation map of Schweinfurth (1957). [::] New starting point for modelling treeline dynamics and treeline shifts in the Himalaya under ...

 

Effects of resource additions on species richness and ANPP in an alpine meadow community

  
Journal of Plant Ecology, Vol. 3, No. 1. (01 March 2010), pp. 25-31, https://doi.org/10.1093/jpe/rtp034

Abstract

[Aims] Theories based on resource additions indicate that plant species richness is mainly determined by the number of limiting resources. However, the individual effects of various limiting resources on species richness and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) are less well understood. Here, we analyzed potential linkages between additions of limiting resources, species loss and ANPP increase and further explored the underlying mechanisms. [Methods] Resources (N, P, K and water) were added in a completely randomized block design to alpine meadow plots in ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 16

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: growth-rates   growth-responses   growth-trends   growth-variability   growth-yield   guajacum-officinale   guajacum-sanctum   guidos-mspa   gvsig   gymmocladus-spp   gymnospermae   gypsonoma-aceriana   gypsonoma-haimbachiana   h-index   habitat   habitat-area   habitat-availability   habitat-classification   habitat-conservation   habitat-description   habitat-suitability   hadgem2-ao   haematoxylum-campechianum   hagenia-abyssinica   haiti   half-sib-families   hamamelis-spp   handbook   handicraft   hardiness   hardware   hardwood   heat-storage   heat-transfer   heating   heatwaves   heavy-metal   heavy-metals   hedera-helix   hedera-spp   height-differentiation   height-growth   helianthus-spp   helianthus-tuberosus   hellenica   hellinger-distance   hemiptera   herbal-medicines   herbicide-control   herbivory   herbivory-impact   herpotrichia-juniperi   heterobasidion   heterobasidion-abietinum   heterobasidion-annosum   heterobasidion-parviporum   heuristics   hevea-brasiliensis   hibiscus-elatus   hibiscus-tiliaceus   hidden-goal   hidden-knowledge   high-impact-publication   high-resolution-data   hill-slope-curvature   hillslope   hilly-areas   himalayan-region   hippophae-rhamnoides   histamine-release   historical-perspective   history   holocene   homeostasis   homogenous-spatial-units   homonyms   honey   honey-production   honeydew   honeydew-honey   hopea-odorata   horticulture   host   host-chemistry   host-defense   host-plant   host-range   host-resistance   host-taxonomy   hotspot   human-behaviour   human-centered-automation   human-diseases   human-health   human-impact   human-influence   human-machine-interface   human-refuge   humboldt   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

The state and fate of Himalayan glaciers

  
Science, Vol. 336, No. 6079. (2012), pp. 310-314, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1215828

Abstract

Himalayan glaciers are a focus of public and scientific debate. Prevailing uncertainties are of major concern because some projections of their future have serious implications for water resources. Most Himalayan glaciers are losing mass at rates similar to glaciers elsewhere, except for emerging indications of stability or mass gain in the Karakoram. A poor understanding of the processes affecting them, combined with the diversity of climatic conditions and the extremes of topographical relief within the region, makes projections speculative. Nevertheless, it ...

 

What benefits do community forests provide, and to whom? A rapid assessment of ecosystem services from a Himalayan forest, Nepal

  
Ecosystem Services, Vol. 8 (June 2014), pp. 118-127, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2014.03.005

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Using TESSA, data on ecosystem services was captured through relatively rapid means. [::] Engaging stakeholders provides insights into distribution of ecosystem services. [::] Benefits are now being captured locally, although they are unevenly distributed. [::] Targeted development can help increase local capture of ecosystem service benefits. [Abstract] In Nepal, community forestry is part of a national strategy for livelihoods improvement and environmental protection. However, analysis of the social, economic and environmental impacts of community forestry is often limited, restricted to a narrow set of benefits ...

 

Modelling of stream run-off and sediment output for erosion hazard assessment in Lesser Himalaya: need for sustainable land use plan using remote sensing and GIS: a case study

  
Natural Hazards, Vol. 59, No. 3. (11 May 2011), pp. 1277-1297, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-011-9833-5

Abstract

Assessment and inventory on soil erosion hazard are essential for the formulation of successful hazard mitigation plans and sustainable development. The objective of this study was to assess and map soil erosion hazard in Lesser Himalaya with a case study. The Dabka watershed constitutes a part of the Kosi Basin in the Lesser Himalaya, India, in district Nainital has been selected for the case illustration. The average rate of erosion hazard is 0.68 mm/year or 224 tons/km2/year. Anthropogenic and geo-environmental factors have together ...

 

Himalayan plants seek cooler climes

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7515. (27 August 2014), pp. 359-359, https://doi.org/10.1038/512359a

Abstract

[Excerpt] Race is on to record mountain biodiversity before it is lost. In India’s Western Himalayas, changes in altitude are so dramatic and steep that alluvial grasslands, subtropical forests, conifers and alpine meadows lie stacked almost on top of each other, producing a spectacular range of vegetation. Now, the myriad plants that inhabit these mountains are migrating upwards because of climate change — and some are in danger of being lost before anyone has even recorded their existence. ...

 

A 3,500-year tree-ring record of annual precipitation on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 8. (25 February 2014), pp. 2903-2908, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1319238111

Abstract

[Significance] This paper describes the production and climatic interpretation of a tree-ring width chronology that is currently the longest, absolutely dated series produced for the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and one of the longest in the world. The method of chronology construction enables comparison of variations in precipitation totals over long timescales as well as shorter periods. Precipitation in this region during the last 50 years has been historically high—likely higher than for any equivalent length period in at least 3,500 years, ...

 

The Himalayas must be protected

  
Nature, Vol. 501, No. 7467. (18 September 2013), pp. 283-283, https://doi.org/10.1038/501283a

Abstract

Climate change and human activities are pushing the fragile ecosystem ever closer to instability, warns Maharaj K. Pandit. ...

 

Threats from India's Himalaya Dams

  
Science, Vol. 339, No. 6115. (04 January 2013), pp. 36-37, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1227211

Abstract

To meet surging domestic energy demand, provide power to the largest population in the world that lacks electricity (>400 million people), and reduce rapidly growing CO2 emissions, the Government of India (GOI) has embarked on a fast-track dam-building program. Over the next several decades, the GOI aims to construct 292 dams throughout the Indian Himalaya, doubling current hydropower capacity and contributing ∼6% to projected national energy needs by 2030 (1). With the use of coal set to expand, India's total carbon ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/himalayan-region

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.