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Selection: with tag forest-pests [at least 200 articles] 

 

Scale-dependent portfolio effects explain growth inflation and volatility reduction in landscape demography

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 47. (21 November 2017), pp. 12507-12511, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1704213114

Abstract

[Significance] Population demography is central to many problems in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology, yet there is a gap between the information needed about the demography of population over multiple spatial scales and the available data, which are largely local. Inspired by concepts from landscape ecology and Markowitz's investment portfolio theory, we address this lacuna by developing a method for quantifying and predicting the demography of multiple populations across spatial scales and apply it to gypsy moth populations. We show that population ...

 

Pest categorisation of Pseudocercospora pini-densiflorae

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 11. (November 2017), e05029, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5029

Abstract

Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Plant Health (PLH) Panel performed a pest categorisation of Pseudocercospora pini-densiflorae, a well-defined and distinguishable fungal species of the family Mycosphaerellaceae. The regulated harmful organism is the anamorph Cercoseptoria pini-densiflorae (synonym Cercospora pini-densiflorae) with the corresponding teleomorph Mycosphaerella gibsonii. P. pini-densiflorae causes a needle blight of Pinus spp. also known as Cercospora blight of pines or Cercospora needle blight. P. pini-densiflorae is reported from sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America, Asia and ...

References

  1. Anon, 2015. PM 7/46 (3) Lecanosticta acicola (formerly Mycosphaerella dearnessii), Dothistroma septosporum (formerly Mycosphaerella pini) and Dothistroma pini. EPPO Bulletin 45, 163–182.
  2. Bossard, M., Feranec, J., Otahel, J., 2000. CORINE land cover technical guide - addendum 2000. Tech. Rep. 40, European Environment Agency. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/032TFUPGVR .
  3. Büttner, G., Kosztra, B., Maucha, G., Pataki, R., 2012. Implementation and achievements of CLC2006. Tech. rep., European Environment Agency. http://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/GQ4JECM8TB .
 

Pest categorisation of Gremmeniella abietina

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 11. (November 2017), e05030, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5030

Abstract

Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Plant Health (PLH) Panel performed a pest categorisation of Gremmeniella abietina, a well-defined species and distinguishable fungus of the family Godroniaceae. The species G. abietina includes several varieties, races and biotypes that are found in different geographical locations, on different hosts and that vary in aggressiveness. The pathogen causes diseases on Pinus species and other conifers such as Abies spp., Picea spp., Larix spp. and Pseudotsuga spp. known as Scleroderris canker in ...

References

  1. Ahlqvist, B., Karlman, M., Witzell, J., 1996. Gremmeniella-infected Pinus contorta as raw material in the production of kraft pulp. European Journal of Forest Pathology 26, 113–121.
  2. Anon, 2009. PM 7/92(1): Gremmeniella abietina. EPPO Bulletin 39, 310–317.
  3. Barbeito, I., Brücker, R., Rixen, C., Bebi, P., 2013. Snow fungi-induced mortality of Pinus cembra at the alpine treeline: evidence from plantations. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research 45, 455–470.
  4. Bernhold, A., Witzell,
 

Pest categorisation of Ips cembrae

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 11. (October 2017), e05039, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5039

Abstract

The Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the large larch bark beetle, Ips cembrae (Heer) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), for the EU. I. cembrae is a well-defined and distinguishable species, native to Europe and recognised mainly as a pest of larch (Larix spp.) and occasionally of pine (Pinus spp.) and spruce (Picea spp.). It is distributed in 16 Member States of the EU and listed in Annex IIB of Council Directive 2000/29/EC. Protected zones are in place in ...

References

  1. Balachowsky, A., 1949. Faune de France. 50 Coleoptères Scolytides. Lechevalier, Paris. 320 pp.
  2. Balogun, R.A., 1970. The life-history and habits of the larch bark beetle, Ips cembrae (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), in the North-East of Scotland. The Canadian Entomologist 102, 226–239.
  3. Bossard, M., Feranec, J., Otahel, J., 2000. CORINE land cover technical guide - Addendum 2000. Technical Report 40, European Environment Agency. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/032TFUPGVR , INRMM-MiD:13106045 .
  4. Bright, D.E.,
 

Pest categorisation of Ips duplicatus

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 10. (October 2017), e05040, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5040

Abstract

The Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the double-spined bark beetle, Ips duplicatus (Sahlberg, 1836) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), for the EU. I. duplicatus is a well-defined and distinguishable species, native to Europe and attacking mainly spruce (Picea spp.) but also observed on pine (Pinus spp.) and larch (Larix spp.). It is distributed in 15 EU Member States and is locally spreading in some of them. I. duplicatus is listed in Annex IIB of Council Directive 2000/29/EC. Protected zones ...

References

  1. Bakke, A., 1975. Aggregation pheromone in the bark beetle Ips duplicatus. Norwegian Journal of Entomology 22(1), 67–70.
  2. Balachowsky, A., 1949. Faune de France. 50. Coleoptères Scolytides. Lechevalier, Paris, 320 pp.
  3. Bossard, M., Feranec, J., Otahel, J., 2000. CORINE land cover technical guide - Addendum 2000. Tech. Rep. 40, European Environment Agency. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/032TFUPGVR , INRMM-MiD:13106045 .
  4. Bright, D.E., Skidmore, R.E., 2002. A catalogue of Scolytidae and Platypodidae
 

Pest categorisation of Ips amitinus

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 10. (October 2017), e05038, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5038

Abstract

The Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the small spruce bark beetle, Ips amitinus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), for the EU. I. amitinus is a well-defined and distinguishable species, native to Europe and attacking mainly spruce (Picea spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.) and sporadically fir (Abies spp.) and larch (Larix spp.). It is distributed in 16 EU Member States and is locally spreading in some. The pest is listed in Annex IIB of Council Directive 2000/29/EC. Protected zones ...

References

  1. Bakke, A., 1968. Ecological studies on bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) associated with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Norway with particular reference to the influence of temperature. Meddelelser fra det Norske Skogsforsoksvesen 21, 441–602.
  2. Balachowsky, A., 1949. Faune de France. 50. Coleoptères Scolytides. Lechevalier, Paris. 320 pp.
  3. Bossard, M., Feranec, J., Otahel, J., 2000. CORINE land cover technical guide - Addendum 2000. Tech. Rep. 40, European Environment Agency. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/032TFUPGVR
 

Pest categorisation of Ips sexdentatus

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 11. (November 2017), e04999, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.4999

Abstract

The Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the six-toothed bark beetle, Ips sexdentatus (Börner) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), for the EU. I. sexdentatus is a well-defined and distinguishable species, native to Eurasia and recognised mainly as a pest of pine (Pinus spp., in the pest's whole range) and spruce (mainly Picea orientalis in Turkey and Georgia). It also might occasionally attack Larix spp. and Abies spp. It is distributed throughout the EU (24 Member States). It is a protected ...

References

  1. Agbaba, S.N., Celepirovic, N., 2008. Health condition of the forest vegetation on the island of Veliki Brijun, National Park Brijuni, Croatia. Radovi Sumarskog Fakulteta Univerziteta u Sarajevu 38, 35–45.
  2. Arefin, V.S., 1983. A method of estimating Ips sexdentatus Coleoptera Ipidae density of egg production. Lesovedenie 1, 56–59.
  3. Bakke, A., 1968. Ecological studies on bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) associated with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Norway with particular reference to the
 

Effects of phosphite in Pinus radiata - Fusarium circinatum interaction

  
(2016)

Abstract

The pitch canker, caused by the fungus Fusarium circinatum, is a disease under quarantine measures affecting Pinus spp. and Pseudotsuga menziesii worldwide. Characterized by the formation of large resinous cankers that girdle shoots, branches, and trunks, leads to the death of the host. To date, there are no means for the control of the pitch canker and, with the growing need to reduce the use of fungicides, another approaches must be studied. A method for the control of phytopathogenic diseases is ...

References


  1. Aguín, O., Mansilla, J. P., Sainz, M. J., 2006. In vitro selection of an effective fungicide against Armillaria mellea and control of white root rot of grapevine in the field. Pest Management Science 62(3), 223-228. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.1149 .
  2. Ahmad, P., John, R., Sarwat, M., Umar, S., 2008. Responses of proline, lipid peroxidation and antioxidative enzymes in two varieties of Pisum sativum L. under salt stress. International Journal of Plant Production 2(4), 353-366.
 

The concept of potential natural vegetation: an epitaph?

  
Journal of Vegetation Science, Vol. 21, No. 6. (December 2010), pp. 1172-1178, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2010.01218.x

Abstract

We discuss the usefulness of the concept of Potential Natural Vegetation (PNV), which describes the expected state of mature vegetation in the absence of human intervention. We argue that it is impossible to model PNV because of (i) the methodological problems associated to its definition and (ii) the issues related to the ecosystems dynamics.We conclude that the approach to characterizing PNV is unrealistic and provides scenarios with limited predictive power. In places with a long-term human history, interpretations of PNV need ...

 

Ecological stability of mixed-species forests

  
In Mixed-Species Forests (2017), pp. 337-382, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-54553-9_7

Abstract

In many parts of the world, forests are likely to face novel disturbance regimes as a result of global change processes, and there is concern that the capacity of forest ecosystems to withstand, recover from, or adapt to these novel disturbance regimes may decline. Creation and maintenance of species-diverse forests is seen as an important option to adapt forests to uncertain future disturbances. However, it is not known whether benefits of mixed-species forests consist mainly of risk spreading among tree species ...

 

Scientific opinion on the pest categorisation of Cryphonectria parasitica (Murrill) Barr

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 12, No. 10. (1 October 2014), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2014.3859

Abstract

The European Commission requested the EFSA Panel on Plant Health to perform a pest categorisation of Cryphonectria parasitica (Murrill) Barr, the fungal pathogen responsible for chestnut blight, a highly destructive disease that kills trees through bark cankers. The pathogen is listed in Annex IIAII of Directive 2000/29/EC. Its identity is clearly defined as C.parasitica (Murrill) Barr and methods exist for its discriminative detection. Several hosts are known, but the main hosts are species of Castanea and Quercus, particularly C.sativa and Q.petraea. ...

References


  1. Adamcikova, K., Kobza, M., Juhasova, G., 2010. Characteristics of the Cryphonectria parasitica isolated from Quercus in Slovakia. Forest Pathology 40, 443–449.
  2. Adamcikova, K., Juhasova, G., Kobza, M., Ondruskova, E., 2013. Diversity of microfungi on branches of Castanea sativa in Slovakia. Polish Botanical Journal 58, 741–746.
  3. Aguín Casal, O., Montenegro Gregorio, D., Pérez Otero, R., Mansilla Vázquez, J.P., 2005. VI Congreso Forestal Español, Zaragoza 2005. Available online: http://www.efadip.org/es/publicaciones/Comunicaciones/2005/Cryphonectria%20parasitica(zaragoza).htm .
 

Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 178, No. 4. (1 June 2008), pp. 719-739, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02436.x

Abstract

Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced ...

 

Climate-driven tree mortality: insights from the piñon pine die-off in the United States

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 200, No. 2. (October 2013), pp. 301-303, https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.12464

Abstract

The global climate is changing, and a range of negative effects on plants has already been observed and will likely continue into the future. One of the most apparent consequences of climate change is widespread tree mortality (Fig. 1). Extensive tree die-offs resulting from recent climate change have been documented across a range of forest types on all forested continents (Allen et al., 2010). The exact physiological mechanisms causing this mortality are not yet well understood (e.g. McDowell, 2011), but they ...

 

Pest categorisation of Ips typographus

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 7. (July 2017), 4881, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.4881

Abstract

The Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the eight-toothed spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), for the EU. I. typographus is a well-defined and distinguishable species, recognised mainly as a pest of spruce (Picea spp.) in Eurasia. It also attacks other conifers such as Abies spp., Larix spp., Pinus spp. and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Native to Eurasia, I. typographus has spread from the native range of spruce to new areas in Eurasia where spruce has been ...

References

  1. Anderbrant, O., 1990. Gallery construction and oviposition of the bark beetle Ips typographus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) at different breeding densities. Ecological Entomology 15, 1–8.
  2. Bakke, A., 1970. Evidence of a population aggregating pheromone in Ips typographus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Contributions from Boyce Thompson Institute 24, 309–310.
  3. Bakke, A., 1976. Spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus: pheromone production and field response to synthetic pheromones. Naturwissenschaften 63, 92–92.
  4. Bakke, A., 1989. The recent
 

Pest categorisation of Dendroctonus micans

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 7. (July 2017), 4880, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.4880

Abstract

The Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Kugelann), (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), for the EU. D. micans is a well-defined and distinguishable species, recognised mainly as a pest of spruce (Picea spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.) in Eurasia. Attacks on other conifers (Abies spp., Larix decidua, Pseudotsuga menziesii) are also reported. Supposedly originating from north-eastern Eurasia, D. micans has spread westward and is now distributed throughout the EU (22 Member States). It ...

References

  1. Akinci, H.A., Ozcan, G.E., Eroglu, M., 2009. Impacts of site effects on losses of oriental spruce during Dendroctonus micans (Kug.) outbreaks in Turkey. African Journal of Biotechnology 8, 3934–3939. https://www.ajol.info/index.php/ajb/article/view/62085 .
  2. Balachowsky, A., 1949. Faune de France. 50. Coleoptères Scolytides. Lechevalier, Paris, 320 pp.
  3. Bergmiller, F., 1903. Dendroctonus micans und Rhizophagus grandis. Zentralblatt für das gesamte Forstwesen, 29, 252–256.
  4. Bevan, D., King, C.J., 1983. Dendroctonus micans
 

Forest disturbances under climate change

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 7, No. 6. (31 May 2017), pp. 395-402, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3303

Abstract

Forest disturbances are sensitive to climate. However, our understanding of disturbance dynamics in response to climatic changes remains incomplete, particularly regarding large-scale patterns, interaction effects and dampening feedbacks. Here we provide a global synthesis of climate change effects on important abiotic (fire, drought, wind, snow and ice) and biotic (insects and pathogens) disturbance agents. Warmer and drier conditions particularly facilitate fire, drought and insect disturbances, while warmer and wetter conditions increase disturbances from wind and pathogens. Widespread interactions between agents are ...

 

Tree diversity reduces pest damage in mature forests across Europe

  
Biology Letters, Vol. 12, No. 4. (27 April 2016), 20151037, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2015.1037

Abstract

Forest pest damage is expected to increase with global change. Tree diversity could mitigate this impact, but unambiguous demonstration of the diversity–resistance relationship is lacking in semi-natural mature forests. We used a network of 208 forest plots sampled along two orthogonal gradients of increasing tree species richness and latitudes to assess total tree defoliation in Europe. We found a positive relationship between tree species richness and resistance to insect herbivores: overall damage to broadleaved species significantly decreased with the number of ...

 

Homologous recombination and Xylella fastidiosa host-pathogen associations in South America

  
Phytopathology, Vol. 107, No. 3. (March 2017), pp. 305-312, https://doi.org/10.1094/phyto-09-16-0321-r

Abstract

Homologous recombination affects the evolution of bacteria such as Xylella fastidiosa, a naturally competent plant pathogen that requires insect vectors for dispersal. This bacterial species is taxonomically divided into subspecies, with phylogenetic clusters within subspecies that are host specific. One subspecies, pauca, is primarily limited to South America, with the exception of recently reported strains in Europe and Costa Rica. Despite the economic importance of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in South America, little is known about its genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence ...

 

Italy rebuked for failure to prevent olive-tree tragedy

  
Nature, Vol. 546, No. 7657. (7 June 2017), pp. 193-194, https://doi.org/10.1038/546193a

Abstract

European Commission reveals widespread delays by the country’s authorities to halt spread of deadly plant disease. [Excerpt] A vicious pathogen that is destroying historic olive groves in Puglia, southern Italy, is marching north and threatens to reach the rest of Europe. Yet Italian authorities last year failed to track the infection’s spread, and didn’t follow containment plans agreed with the European Commission, according to an audit released last week by the commission. [...] The pathogen — for which there is no cure ...

 

Network analysis reveals why Xylella fastidiosa will persist in Europe

  
Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1. (6 March 2017), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-00077-z

Abstract

The insect vector borne bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was first detected in olive trees in Southern Italy in 2013, and identified as the main culprit behind the ‘olive quick decline syndrome’. Since then, the disease has spread rapidly through Italy’s main olive oil producing region. The epidemiology of the outbreak is largely unstudied, with the list of X. fastidiosa hosts and vectors in Europe likely incomplete, and the role humans play in dispersal unknown. These knowledge gaps have led to management strategies ...

 

A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: beyond drought effects

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 148 (January 2017), pp. 42-54, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.11.012

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Different global change factors combine causing unprecedented ecological effects. [::] Much more complex interactions arise when combinations occur together. [::] Drought should be considered when designing and applying management policies. [::] Conserving Mediterranean terrestrial ecosystems is a collective effort. [Abstract] Climate change, alteration of atmospheric composition, land abandonment in some areas and land use intensification in others, wildfires and biological invasions threaten forests, shrublands and pastures all over the world. However, the impacts of the combinations between global change factors are not well understood despite ...

 

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/873 of 1 June 2016 amending Regulation (EC) No 690/2008 recognising protected zones exposed to particular plant health risks in the Community

  
Official Journal of the European Union, Vol. 59, No. L 145. (June 2016), pp. 10-17
Keywords: agricultural-resources   anthonomus-grandis   bemisia-tabaci   cephalcia-lariciphila   ceratocystis-platani   cryphonectria-parasitica   curtobacterium-flaccumfaciens   daktulosphaira-vitifoliae   dendroctonus-micans   dryocosmus-kuriphilus   eli-identifier   erwinia-amylovora   european-commission   european-union   forest-pests   forest-resources   fungal-diseases   gilpinia-hercyniae   globodera-pallida   globodera-rostochiensis   glomerella-gossypii   gonipterus-scutellatus   gremmeniella-abietina   hypoxylon-mammatum   ips-amitinus   ips-cembrae   ips-duplicatus   ips-sexdentatus   ips-typographus   legislation   leptinotarsa-decemlineata   liriomyza-bryoniae   paysandisia-archon   plant-diseases   plant-pests   protection   rhynchophorus-ferrugineus   sternochetus-mangiferae   thaumetopoea-pityocampa   thaumetopoea-processionea   tree-diseases   xanthomonas-arboricola  

Abstract

[Excerpt] [:Article 1] Amendment of Regulation (EC) No 690/2008 [\n] Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 690/2008 is replaced by the text set out in the Annex to this Regulation. [:Article 2] Entry into force and application [\n] This Regulation shall enter into force on the day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union. It shall apply from 1 May 2016. [\n] [...] ...

 

Commission Regulation (EC) No 690/2008 of 4 July 2008 recognising protected zones exposed to particular plant health risks in the Community (Recast)

  
Official Journal of the European Union, Vol. 51, No. L 193. (July 2008), pp. 1-6

Abstract

[Excerpt] [:Article 1] The zones in the Community listed in Annex I are recognised as protected zones within the meaning of the first subparagraph of Article 2(1)(h) of Directive 2000/29/EC, in respect of the harmful organism(s) listed against their names in Annex I to this Regulation. [:Article 2] Directive 2001/32/EC, as amended by the acts listed in Annex II, Part A, is repealed, without prejudice to the obligations of the Member States relating to the time-limits for transposition into national law and application of the ...

 

Adapting to climate change

  
In Climate Change and United States Forests, Vol. 57 (2014), pp. 183-222, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7515-2_8

Abstract

Federal agencies have led the development of adaptation principles and tools in forest ecosystems over the past decade. Successful adaptation efforts generally require organizations to: (1) develop science-management partnerships, (2) provide education on climate change science, (3) provide a toolkit of methods and processes for vulnerability assessment and adaptation, (4) use multiple models to generate projections of climate change effects, (5) incorporate risk and uncertainty, (6) integrate with multiple management objectives, (7) prioritize no-regrets decision making, (8) support flexibility and adaptive ...

 

Risk of multiple interacting tipping points should encourage rapid CO2 emission reduction

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 6, No. 5. (21 March 2016), pp. 520-525, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2964

Abstract

Evidence suggests that several elements of the climate system could be tipped into a different state by global warming, causing irreversible economic damages. To address their policy implications, we incorporated five interacting climate tipping points into a stochastic-dynamic integrated assessment model, calibrating their likelihoods and interactions on results from an existing expert elicitation. Here we show that combining realistic assumptions about policymakers’ preferences under uncertainty, with the prospect of multiple future interacting climate tipping points, increases the present social cost of ...

 

The status of our scientific understanding of lodgepole pine and mountain pine beetles - A focus on forest ecology and fire behavior

  
Global Fire Initiative technical report, Vol. 2008, No. 2. (2008), pp. 1-13

Abstract

A synthesis of our current knowledge about the effects of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on lodgepole pine forests and fire behavior, with a geographic focus on Colorado and southern Wyoming. [Excerpt: Implications for future forests] Models for predicting future climates have progressed dramatically in recent years, but their accuracy is questionable for planning purposes, particularly at local levels. Nonetheless, model predictions suggest significant alterations in climate from past observed patterns. These predictions are supported by recent climate events that themselves had largely been predicted several years ago. Therefore, the potential ...

 

US exposure to multiple landscape stressors and climate change

  
Regional Environmental Change, Vol. 16, No. 7. (2016), pp. 2129-2140, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-016-0934-2

Abstract

We examined landscape exposure to wildfire potential, insects and disease risk, and urban and exurban development for the conterminous US (CONUS). Our analysis relied on spatial data used by federal agencies to evaluate these stressors nationally. We combined stressor data with a climate change exposure metric to identify when temperature is likely to depart from historical conditions and become “unprecedented.” We used a neighborhood analysis procedure based on key stressor thresholds within a geographic information system to examine the extent of ...

 

Disturbance and the carbon balance of US forests: a quantitative review of impacts from harvests, fires, insects, and droughts

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 143 (August 2016), pp. 66-80, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.06.002

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Available data suggest harvest is the leading disturbance impact on C in US forests then fire, windthrow, insects, and droughts. [::] Disturbances in US forests lead to the loss of at least 200 Tg C in live biomass each year on average. [::] Regrowth roughly balances disturbance emissions, with growth enhancements contributing significantly to the net change in forest carbon. [::] Natural disturbance events are likely to rise in the future, leading to net release of forest carbon. [Abstract] Disturbances are a major determinant of ...

 

Darcy's law predicts widespread forest mortality under climate warming

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 5, No. 7. (18 May 2015), pp. 669-672, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2641

Abstract

Nature Climate Change | Letter Print Share/bookmark Darcy's law predicts widespread forest mortality under climate warming Nathan G. McDowell & Craig D. Allen Affiliations Contributions Corresponding author Nature Climate Change 5, 669–672 (2015) https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2641 Received 23 July 2014 Accepted 07 April ...

 

Dutch elm disease and elm bark beetles: a century of association

  
iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, Vol. 8, No. 2. (01 April 2015), pp. 126-134, https://doi.org/10.3832/ifor1231-008

Abstract

Bark beetles of the genus Scolytus Geoffroy are the main vectors of the fungus Ophiostoma ulmi s.l., which causes the Dutch elm disease. The large and small elm bark beetles - S. scolytus (F.) and S. multistriatus (Marsham), respectively - are the most common and important species spreading the pathogen worldwide. The success of the pathogen-insect interactions is mainly due to the characteristic reproductive behavior of the elm bark beetles, which, however, largely depends on the occurrence of infected trees. During ...

 

Unraveling the drivers of intensifying forest disturbance regimes in Europe

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 17, No. 9. (September 2011), pp. 2842-2852, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02452.x

Abstract

Natural disturbances like wildfire, windthrow and insect outbreaks are critical drivers of composition, structure and functioning of forest ecosystems. They are strongly climate-sensitive, and are thus likely to be distinctly affected by climatic changes. Observations across Europe show that in recent decades, forest disturbance regimes have intensified markedly, resulting in a strong increase in damage from wind, bark beetles and wildfires. Climate change is frequently hypothesized as the main driving force behind this intensification, but changes in forest structure and composition ...

 

Interactions of landscape disturbances and climate change dictate ecological pattern and process: spatial modeling of wildfire, insect, and disease dynamics under future climates

  
Landscape Ecology (2016), pp. 1-13, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-016-0414-6

Abstract

[Context] Interactions among disturbances, climate, and vegetation influence landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. Climate changes, exotic invasions, beetle outbreaks, altered fire regimes, and human activities may interact to produce landscapes that appear and function beyond historical analogs. [Objectives] We used the mechanistic ecosystem-fire process model FireBGCv2 to model interactions of wildland fire, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) under current and future climates, across three diverse study areas. [Methods] We assessed changes in tree basal area as a measure of ...

 

Human-caused climate change is now a key driver of forest fire activity in the western United States

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201612926, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1612926113

Abstract

[Excerpt] Effects of climate warming on natural and human systems are becoming increasingly visible across the globe. For example, the shattering of past yearly records for global high temperatures seems to be a near-annual event, with the five hottest years since 1880 all occurring since 2005. Not coincidentally, the single hottest year on record, 2015, also broke records for area burned by wildfire in the United States [...], eclipsing the previous high mark set just one decade prior. Scientists have known ...

 

Potential insect vectors of Bursaphelenchus spp. (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae) in Spanish pine forests

  
In Pine Wilt Disease: A Worldwide Threat to Forest Ecosystems (2008), pp. 221-234, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8455-3_19

Abstract

Potential insect vectors of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (PWN) were studied. Pathways of introduction of PWN from Portugal to Europe, through Spain, were determined and traps were located in pine stands sites along the pathways. 19 Cerambycidae, 12 Scolytidae, 12 Buprestidae and 10 Curculionidae species have been found. Trapped insects were examined for the presence of nematodes under their elytra. Nematodes were found on Arhopalus ferus, Spondylis buprestoides, Hylastes ater, Hylurgus lingniperda, Orthotomicus erosus, Pityogenes bidentatus, Tomicus piniperda, Hylobius abietis and Pissodes validirrostris ...

 

The International Plant Sentinel Network: a tool for regional and national plant protection organizations

  
EPPO Bulletin, Vol. 46, No. 1. (April 2016), pp. 156-162, https://doi.org/10.1111/epp.12283

Abstract

[Excerpt:Introduction] A 2011 global survey of botanic gardens and arboreta, which included 204 respondents from 146 institutes, revealed that the botanic garden community has the potential to play a significant role in safeguarding plant health. However, responding institutes cited a lack of available training, resources and coordination to support any such work (Kramer & Hird 2011). Since its launch in November 2013, the International Plant Sentinel Network (IPSN) has been working to provide this support and illustrate the usefulness of such a ...

 

Update of a database of host plants of Xylella fastidiosa: 20 November 2015

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 14, No. 2. (1 February 2016), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2016.4378

Abstract

Following a request from the European Commission, EFSA was tasked to periodically update its database of host plants of Xylella fastidiosa which was published in April 2015. An extensive literature search approach was used for updating the database in order to catch all new scientific developments published on the topic. Furthermore, the outputs of investigations conducted on host plants affected by X. fastidiosa in the Italian and French outbreaks were included. Literature screening and data extraction were performed using the Distiller ...

 

Planting sentinel European trees in Eastern Asia as a novel method to identify potential insect pest invaders

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 5. (20 May 2015), e0120864, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120864

Abstract

Quarantine measures to prevent insect invasions tend to focus on well-known pests but a large proportion of the recent invaders were not known to cause significant damage in their native range, or were not even known to science before their introduction. A novel method is proposed to detect new potential pests of woody plants in their region of origin before they are introduced to a new continent. Since Asia is currently considered to be the main supplier of insect invaders to ...

 

Citizen science and early detection of invasive species: phenology of first occurrences of Halyomorpha halys in Southern Europe

  
Biological Invasions (2016), pp. 1-8, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1217-z

Abstract

Early detection of invasive alien species and the ability to track their spread are critical for undertaking appropriate management decisions. Citizen science surveys are potentially valuable tools for quickly obtaining information on biodiversity and species distributions. The Asian brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, is an invasive pest of agricultural crops and a dwelling nuisance. Halyomorpha halys was first recorded in Italy in 2012 in Emilia Romagna, one of the most important fruit producing regions of Europe. To rapidly obtain data ...

 

The ash dieback crisis: genetic variation in resistance can prove a long-term solution

  
Plant Pathology, Vol. 63, No. 3. (June 2014), pp. 485-499, https://doi.org/10.1111/ppa.12196

Abstract

Over the last two decades, ash dieback has become a major problem in Europe, where the causative fungus has invaded the continent rapidly. The disease is caused by the invasive pathogenic fungus Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus (anamorph Chalara fraxinea), which causes severe symptoms and dieback in common ash, Fraxinus excelsior. It is becoming a significant threat to biodiversity in forest ecosystems and the economic and aesthetic impacts are immense. Despite the presence of the disease for at least 10 years in Scandinavia, a ...

 

Detection of Chalara fraxinea from tissue of Fraxinus excelsior using species-specific ITS primers

  
Forest Pathology, Vol. 40, No. 2. (April 2010), pp. 111-115, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0329.2009.00614.x

Abstract

Chalara fraxinea (teleomorph: Hymenoscyphus albidus) is known as a serious pathogen of Fraxinus excelsior, causing massive dieback of trees in Europe. The fungus is able to cause latent infections, and has been previously detected as an endophyte in asymptomatic tissues. Chalara fraxinea is a slow grower in culture, and is thus likely to be overgrown by faster growing fungi whenever pure culture isolations are being attempted. This study reports species-specific ITS primers allowing fast and reliable detection of the pathogen directly ...

 

The introduction of lodgepole pine as a major forest crop in Sweden: implications for host-pathogen evolution

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 85-96, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00491-6

Abstract

Theoretical and experimental investigations of natural selection in host–pathogen systems are reviewed and the general principles emerging from these studies are used to analyse the possible pathogenic consequences of introducing lodgepole pine into Sweden. Introduction of lodgepole pine alone is likely to pose a relatively low disease risk for native forests. The possible evolution of more aggressive populations of native Scots pine pathogens on highly stressed lodgepole pine plantations is, nevertheless, of some concern. These pathogens could, subsequently, transfer back on ...

 

Insects on lodgepole pine in Sweden - current knowledge and potential risks

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 107-116, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00494-1

Abstract

Eighty species of forest insects have thus far been recorded feeding on lodgepole pine in the Nordic countries (61 in Sweden). The list includes species that have Scots pine as their main host and which feed on needles, flowers, cones, and shoots, as well as species boring in the phloem and xylem of dead or dying Norway spruce. Contrary to our expectations, most of the insect species that have colonised lodgepole pine in Sweden can be considered specialists (with regard to ...

 

Forest Service survey finds record 66 million dead trees in Southern Sierra Nevada

  
(June 2016)

Abstract

[Excerpt] The U.S. Forest Service today announced that it has identified an additional 26 million trees dead in California since October 2015. These trees are located in six counties across 760,000 acres in the southern Sierra Nevada region of the state, and are in addition to the 40 million trees that died statewide from 2010 to October 2015, bringing the total to at least 66 million dead trees. Four consecutive years of severe drought in California, a dramatic rise in bark ...

 

Forest-landscape structure mediates effects of a spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreak on subsequent likelihood of burning in Alaskan boreal forest

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 369 (June 2016), pp. 38-46, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2016.03.036

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We measured forest-landscape structure effects on disturbance patterns in Alaska. [::] Disturbance patterns and interactions were related to tree-species composition. [::] Bark beetles lead to increased probability of fire in mixed-spruce stands. [::] Results can inform management of disturbance in Alaska with climate change. [Abstract] Characterizing how variation in forest landscape structure shapes patterns of natural disturbances and mediates interactions between multiple disturbances is critical for anticipating ecological consequences of climate change in high-latitude forest ecosystems. During the 1990s, a massive spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus ...

 

Ecohydrology of an outbreak: mountain pine beetle impacts trees in drier landscape positions first

  
Ecohydrology, Vol. 6, No. 3. (June 2013), pp. 444-454, https://doi.org/10.1002/eco.1286

Abstract

Vegetation pattern and landscape structure intersect to exert strong control over ecohydrological dynamics at the watershed scale. The hydrologic implications of vegetation disturbance (e.g. fire, disease) depend on the spatial pattern and form of environmental change. Here, we investigate this intersection at Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF), Montana, with a focus on the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic currently affecting the Rocky Mountains. We calibrated QuickBird remote sensing imagery with a leaf-level spectral library of local vegetation. We used this ...

 

Characteristics of Norway spruce trees (Picea abies) surviving a spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) outbreak

  
Trees - Structure and Function In Trees, Vol. 25, No. 6. (24 May 2011), pp. 965-973, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00468-011-0571-9

Abstract

The characteristics of spruce individuals, which survived a massive bark beetle outbreak, were compared with the characteristics of neighbouring attacked trees in Šumava National Park (Czech Republic). Selected parameters related to crown geometry, stand conditions and distances between trees were measured or estimated. Significant differences were found between the surviving trees and the neighbouring trees attacked by I. typographus. Trees with a higher level of stem shading (longer crown length) tended to survive. The attacked trees were usually located in areas ...

 

Drought triggered tree mortality in mixed conifer forests in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 218, No. 1-3. (October 2005), pp. 229-244, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2005.07.014

Abstract

Tree mortality is an important process causing forest structural and compositional change. In this study, we investigate the influence of drought and topography on recent patterns of tree mortality in old-growth mixed conifer forests in Yosemite National Park, located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of northern California, USA. The surveyed stands have experienced a century of fire exclusion and are dominated by associations of Pinus ponderosa, Calocedrus decurrens and Abies concolor. The average age of trees in the stands was 88 ...

 

Plant-pest interactions in time and space: a Douglas-fir bark beetle outbreak as a case study

  
Landscape Ecology, Vol. 14, No. 2. (1999), pp. 105-120, https://doi.org/10.1023/a%3a1008017711917

Abstract

A conceptual model of Douglas-fir bark beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) dynamics and associated host tree mortality across multiple spatial and temporal scales was developed, then used to guide a study of the association between the occurrence of beetle- killed trees and factors that might render trees more susceptible to attack. Long-term records of beetle kill showed that beetle epidemics were associated with windstorms and drought at statewide and local spatial scales. At the landscape scale, beetle kill was associated with (i) portions ...

 

Fine-scale spruce mortality dynamics driven by bark beetle disturbance in Babia Góra National Park, Poland

  
European Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 135, No. 3. (2016), pp. 507-517, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10342-016-0949-8

Abstract

Bark beetle outbreaks have had major impacts on Norway spruce forests in Europe. The large majority of these forests are located in areas under forest management; thus, few studies have investigated outbreak-driven spruce mortality patterns unaffected by humans. Our study examined spruce mortality resultant from a beetle outbreak in a high-elevation, unmanaged forest over a 17-year span. We analyzed three tree-level survivorship and DBH datasets collected during pre-, mid-, and post-outbreak conditions to evaluate long-term mortality dynamics. We measured changes in ...

 

The relationship between potential solar radiation and spruce bark beetle catches in pheromone traps

  
Annals of Forest Research, Vol. 55, No. 2. (2012), pp. 243-252

Abstract

We analysed the relationship between the amount of potential solar radiation and spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L.) catches in pheromone traps in an unmanaged nature reserve in the Carpathians (middle Slovakia region), from 2006 through 2009. This relationship was analysed under outbreak conditions. The number of traps varied in different years from 70 to 92. The traps were installed in spruce-forest-dominated stands affected by a windstorm in 2004. A GPS device was used to mark the position of the pheromone ...

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
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INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.