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Selection: with tag forest-management [132 articles] 

 

US natural resources and climate change: concepts and approaches for management adaptation

  
Environmental Management, Vol. 44, No. 6. (2009), pp. 1001-1021, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00267-009-9345-1

Abstract

Public lands and waters in the United States traditionally have been managed using frameworks and objectives that were established under an implicit assumption of stable climatic conditions. However, projected climatic changes render this assumption invalid. Here, we summarize general principles for management adaptations that have emerged from a major literature review. These general principles cover many topics including: (1) how to assess climate impacts to ecosystem processes that are key to management goals; (2) using management practices to support ecosystem resilience; ...

 

Spreading like wildfire

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 7, No. 11. (November 2017), pp. 755-755, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3432

Abstract

The 2017 wildfire season has seen unusually high fire levels in many parts of the world, with extensive and severe fires occurring in Chile, the Mediterranean, Russia, the US, Canada and even Greenland. Is this a sign of things to come? [Excerpt] During January and February, Chile experienced what their president Michelle Bachelet called “The greatest forest disaster in our history”. The nation was not adequately equipped to tackle these fires, leading the government to enact a state of emergency and accept ...

 

Effects of phosphite in Pinus radiata - Fusarium circinatum interaction

  
(2016)

Abstract

The pitch canker, caused by the fungus Fusarium circinatum, is a disease under quarantine measures affecting Pinus spp. and Pseudotsuga menziesii worldwide. Characterized by the formation of large resinous cankers that girdle shoots, branches, and trunks, leads to the death of the host. To date, there are no means for the control of the pitch canker and, with the growing need to reduce the use of fungicides, another approaches must be studied. A method for the control of phytopathogenic diseases is ...

References


  1. Aguín, O., Mansilla, J. P., Sainz, M. J., 2006. In vitro selection of an effective fungicide against Armillaria mellea and control of white root rot of grapevine in the field. Pest Management Science 62(3), 223-228. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.1149 .
  2. Ahmad, P., John, R., Sarwat, M., Umar, S., 2008. Responses of proline, lipid peroxidation and antioxidative enzymes in two varieties of Pisum sativum L. under salt stress. International Journal of Plant Production 2(4), 353-366.
 

Early postfire vegetation recovery of Pinus brutia forests: effects offire severity, prefire stand age, and aspect

  
Turkish Journal of Agriculture and Forestry, Vol. 40 (2016), pp. 723-736, https://doi.org/10.3906/tar-1601-21

Abstract

Forests dominated by serotinous tree species are usually generalized to follow an autosuccessional model of postfire recovery. However, recent studies have suggested that prefire conditions, topography, and idiosyncrasies of the fire disturbance can have notable effects on how such forests respond to fire. We investigated the effects of fire severity, prefire stand age, and aspect (slope orientation) on the early postfire recovery of Pinus brutia forest. The study site was the area of 2008 Serik-Tasağıl Fire, one of the largest forest ...

 

Assessing risk and adaptation options to fires and windstorms in European forestry

  
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Vol. 15, No. 7. (10 July 2010), pp. 681-701, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11027-010-9243-0

Abstract

Risks can generally be described as the combination of hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Using this framework, we evaluated the historical and future development of risk of fire and wind damage in European forestry at the national level. Fire risk is expected to increase, mainly as a consequence of an increase in fire hazard, defined as the Fire Weather Index in summer. Exposure, defined as forest area, is expected to increase slightly as a consequence of active afforestation and abandonment of marginal ...

 

Shifts in community-level traits and functional diversity in a mixed conifer forest: a legacy of land-use change

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 53, No. 6. (December 2016), pp. 1755-1765, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12737

Abstract

[Summary] [::1] Historical reference conditions have long been used to guide the restoration of degraded ecosystems. However, a rapidly changing climate and altered disturbance regimes are calling into question the usefulness of this approach. As a consequence, restoration goals are increasingly focused on creating communities that are resilient to novel environmental stressors and emphasis is being placed on defining functional targets through the use of plant traits. While changes in forest structure and composition have received much attention, long-term changes in stand-level ...

 

Newly discovered landscape traps produce regime shifts in wet forests

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 108, No. 38. (20 September 2011), pp. 15887-15891, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1110245108

Abstract

We describe the “landscape trap” concept, whereby entire landscapes are shifted into, and then maintained (trapped) in, a highly compromised structural and functional state as the result of multiple temporal and spatial feedbacks between human and natural disturbance regimes. The landscape trap concept builds on ideas like stable alternative states and other relevant concepts, but it substantively expands the conceptual thinking in a number of unique ways. In this paper, we (i) review the literature to develop the concept of landscape ...

 

Patterns of fire severity and forest conditions in the western Klamath Mountains, California

  
Conservation Biology, Vol. 18, No. 4. (August 2004), pp. 927-936, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2004.00493.x

Abstract

The Klamath-Siskiyou region of northwestern California and southwestern Oregon supports globally outstanding temperate biodiversity. Fire has been important in the evolutionary history that shaped this diversity, but recent human influences have altered the fire environment. We tested for modern human impacts on the fire regime by analyzing temporal patterns in fire extent and spatial patterns of fire severity in relation to vegetation structure, past fire occurrence, roads, and timber management in a 98,814-ha area burned in 1987. Fire severity was mapped ...

 

The concept of potential natural vegetation: an epitaph?

  
Journal of Vegetation Science, Vol. 21, No. 6. (December 2010), pp. 1172-1178, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2010.01218.x

Abstract

We discuss the usefulness of the concept of Potential Natural Vegetation (PNV), which describes the expected state of mature vegetation in the absence of human intervention. We argue that it is impossible to model PNV because of (i) the methodological problems associated to its definition and (ii) the issues related to the ecosystems dynamics.We conclude that the approach to characterizing PNV is unrealistic and provides scenarios with limited predictive power. In places with a long-term human history, interpretations of PNV need ...

 

The effects of thinning and similar stand treatments on fire behavior in Western forests

  

Abstract

In the West, thinning and partial cuttings are being considered for treating millions of forested acres that are overstocked and prone to wildfire. The objectives of these treatments include tree growth redistribution, tree species regulation, timber harvest, wildlife habitat improvement, and wildfire-hazard reduction. Depending on the forest type and its structure, thinning has both positive and negative impacts on crown fire potential. Crown bulk density, surface fuel, and crown base height are primary stand characteristics that determine crown fire potential. Thinning ...

 

A comparison of landscape fuel treatment strategies to mitigate wildland fire risk in the urban interface and preserve old forest structure

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 259, No. 8. (31 March 2010), pp. 1556-1570, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2010.01.032

Abstract

We simulated fuel reduction treatments on a 16,000 ha study area in Oregon, US, to examine tradeoffs between placing fuel treatments near residential structures within an urban interface, versus treating stands in the adjacent wildlands to meet forest health and ecological restoration goals. The treatment strategies were evaluated by simulating 10,000 wildfires with random ignition locations and calculating burn probabilities by 0.5 m flame length categories for each 30 m × 30 m pixel in the study area. The burn conditions for the wildfires were chosen to ...

 

Can the use of continuous cover forestry alone maintain silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) in central European mountain forests?

  
Forestry, Vol. 89, No. 4. (August 2016), pp. 412-421, https://doi.org/10.1093/forestry/cpw013

Abstract

Chronic browsing and inappropriate stand management are often discussed as causes for recruitment failure of tree species in temperate mixed uneven-aged forests. Continuous cover forestry is thought to produce conditions that are conducive to the recruitment of native shade-tolerant and browse-sensitive tree species such as silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). This study used density-dependent matrix population models parameterized for three main types of fir forests in Europe (53 048 measured trees from 3183 permanent sample plots) to project the effects of ...

 

Managing alpine forests in a changing climate

  
In Management Strategies to Adapt Alpine Space Forests to Climate Change Risks (28 August 2013), pp. 369-383, https://doi.org/10.5772/56272
edited by Gillian Cerbu

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] There is mounting evidence that Alpine forest ecosystems will not be able to fully absorb the changes in site factors associated with climate change, such as higher temperatures, more intensive drought stress and associated biotic impacts since these changes exceed the adaptive capacity of the trees. The projected changes in temperature by 2.2 to 5.1 K from 1980 to 1999 to 2080 to 2099, for the A1B scenario in southern Europe [1], correspond to an altitudinal shift of 300 to ...

Visual summary

 

A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: beyond drought effects

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 148 (January 2017), pp. 42-54, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.11.012

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Different global change factors combine causing unprecedented ecological effects. [::] Much more complex interactions arise when combinations occur together. [::] Drought should be considered when designing and applying management policies. [::] Conserving Mediterranean terrestrial ecosystems is a collective effort. [Abstract] Climate change, alteration of atmospheric composition, land abandonment in some areas and land use intensification in others, wildfires and biological invasions threaten forests, shrublands and pastures all over the world. However, the impacts of the combinations between global change factors are not well understood despite ...

 

The impacts of logging on landslide activity at Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia

  
CATENA, Vol. 38, No. 4. (February 2000), pp. 279-300, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0341-8162(99)00078-8

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of logging on landslide activity in Clayoquot Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A total of 1004 landslides were documented in order to test the hypothesis that areas affected by logging activities show different density, frequency and magnitude characteristics of landsliding than areas unaffected by logging. The frequency of landslides in logged terrain was found to be nine times higher than in undisturbed forest. An exponential increase ...

 

An approach towards an estimate of the impact of forest management and climate change on the European forest sector carbon budget: Germany as a case study

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 162, No. 1. (June 2002), pp. 87-103, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(02)00052-x

Abstract

The increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and the consequent warming of the Earth’s surface presents a threat to the environment and economic development. This paper discusses how regional level impacts of transient climate change on forest growth are assessed with process-based models and how these responses are then scaled up to country and European level using national forest inventory data in combination with the European forest information scenario (EFISCEN) model. Stem wood volume and increment in the EFISCEN ...

 

Forest value: more than commercial

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6319. (23 December 2016), pp. 1541-1541, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aal2499

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] Postulating a positive relation between tree species richness and commercial value could potentially have adverse environmental consequences. For example, concluding that megadiverse tropical forests have innate commercial value would make it unnecessary to supplement this supposed value with rewards for landowners who preserve their native forests. Landowners might then continue to convert such forests to profitable monocultures [...] which have real commercial value. Species-rich forests indeed have an extremely high conservation and ecosystem service value, but their commercial value ...

 

Forest value: more than commercial - Response

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6319. (23 December 2016), pp. 1541-1542, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aal2612

Abstract

[Excerpt] Paul and Knoke address the commercial value and profitability of forest biodiversity, which differs fundamentally from the economic value that we outlined in our Research Article. [...] Our estimates pertain to the sole contribution of tree species diversity, as it exists today, to global forest productivity, from which the economic value accrues. Our analysis—which includes nonmarket values not commonly captured in commercial forestry but excludes the contribution of forest biodiversity to carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, and aesthetic and cultural values—reflects ...

 

Climate change impacts and adaptation in forest management: a review

  
Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 72, No. 2. (2015), pp. 145-167, https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-014-0446-5

Abstract

[Key message] Adaptation of forest management to climate change requires an understanding of the effects of climate on forests, industries and communities; prediction of how these effects might change over time; and incorporation of this knowledge into management decisions. This requires multiple forms of knowledge and new approaches to forest management decisions. Partnerships that integrate researchers from multiple disciplines with forest managers and local actors can build a shared understanding of future challenges and facilitate improved decision making in the face of ...

 

Adapting to climate change

  
In Climate Change and United States Forests, Vol. 57 (2014), pp. 183-222, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7515-2_8

Abstract

Federal agencies have led the development of adaptation principles and tools in forest ecosystems over the past decade. Successful adaptation efforts generally require organizations to: (1) develop science-management partnerships, (2) provide education on climate change science, (3) provide a toolkit of methods and processes for vulnerability assessment and adaptation, (4) use multiple models to generate projections of climate change effects, (5) incorporate risk and uncertainty, (6) integrate with multiple management objectives, (7) prioritize no-regrets decision making, (8) support flexibility and adaptive ...

 

Does increased forest protection correspond to higher fire severity in frequent-fire forests of the western United States?

  
Ecosphere, Vol. 7, No. 10. (October 2016), e01492, https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1492

Abstract

There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly after decades of fire suppression. This view has led to recent proposals—both administrative and legislative—to reduce or eliminate forest protections and increase some forms of logging based on the belief that ...

 

Darcy's law predicts widespread forest mortality under climate warming

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 5, No. 7. (18 May 2015), pp. 669-672, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2641

Abstract

Nature Climate Change | Letter Print Share/bookmark Darcy's law predicts widespread forest mortality under climate warming Nathan G. McDowell & Craig D. Allen Affiliations Contributions Corresponding author Nature Climate Change 5, 669–672 (2015) https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2641 Received 23 July 2014 Accepted 07 April ...

 

Positive biodiversity-productivity relationship predominant in global forests

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6309. (14 October 2016), aaf8957, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf8957

Abstract

[Abstract] The biodiversity-productivity relationship (BPR) is foundational to our understanding of the global extinction crisis and its impacts on ecosystem functioning. Understanding BPR is critical for the accurate valuation and effective conservation of biodiversity. Using ground-sourced data from 777,126 permanent plots, spanning 44 countries and most terrestrial biomes, we reveal a globally consistent positive concave-down BPR, showing that continued biodiversity loss would result in an accelerating decline in forest productivity worldwide. The value of biodiversity in maintaining commercial forest productivity alone—US$166 billion ...

 

Human-caused climate change is now a key driver of forest fire activity in the western United States

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201612926, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1612926113

Abstract

[Excerpt] Effects of climate warming on natural and human systems are becoming increasingly visible across the globe. For example, the shattering of past yearly records for global high temperatures seems to be a near-annual event, with the five hottest years since 1880 all occurring since 2005. Not coincidentally, the single hottest year on record, 2015, also broke records for area burned by wildfire in the United States [...], eclipsing the previous high mark set just one decade prior. Scientists have known ...

 

Does background matter? Disciplinary perspectives on sustainable forest management

  
Biodiversity and Conservation, Vol. 23, No. 14. (2014), pp. 3373-3389, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0816-1

Abstract

Although sustainable forest management (SFM) has become increasingly popular during recent decades, approaches towards it are still imprecise and lack consistency. Within this “chaos”, scientists are increasingly expected to further develop the concept across disciplinary boundaries, including normative statements relating to the future. However, we assume that disciplinary boundaries in the construction of SFM still exist due to prevalent interests and political intentions within scientific communities. Therefore, our aim is to analyse and explain qualitative differences in the construction of SFM ...

 

Bioeconomy - an emerging meta-discourse affecting forest discourses?

  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 29, No. 4. (19 May 2014), pp. 386-393, https://doi.org/10.1080/02827581.2014.920044

Abstract

The term bioeconomy and closely related notions like bio-based economy or knowledge-based bioeconomy (KBBE) are increasingly used by scientists and politicians in the last years. It does therefore have the potential of becoming an influential global discourse. Its role is however so far unclear. The general assumption that guides this paper is that discourses, resulting ideas and arguments are generally said to have performative power. They shape actors' views, influence their behaviour, impact on their beliefs and interests and can cause ...

 

Does it take prices to make volumes move? A comparison of timber market functioning in Finland and Lithuania

  
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 31, No. 4. (18 May 2016), pp. 428-433, https://doi.org/10.1080/02827581.2016.1158309

Abstract

Forest ownership structure is known to have implications for forest management and the production of forest products and services. The ownership structure, as well as the degree of state regulation of forestry, could thus be expected to affect the functioning of timber markets. Hence, in the presence of strict prescriptions for forest management, the self-regulating mechanisms of timber markets – governed by the economic principle of supply and demand – could be inhibited. Using Finland and Lithuania as contrasting cases, we ...

 

The introduction of lodgepole pine for wood production in Sweden - a review

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 15-29, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00485-0

Abstract

The species-specific properties and the environmental requirements of lodgepole pine (LP) in both its native environment and as an exotic are reviewed in order to describe the large-scale introduction of this tree to Sweden, where the planted area has reached about 600,000 ha during a 25-year period. LP is estimated to produce 36% more wood than Scots pine (SP) and survives better in the young stages, but is less stable against wind and snow load after being planted. Other species differences ...

 

Introduction of lodgepole pine in Sweden - Ecological relevance for vertebrates

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 143-153, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00497-7

Abstract

Several factors like vegetation structure, quality of food and protection from predators influence habitat utilisation by vertebrates. When an exotic tree species is introduced it has the potential to affect vertebrates in a number of ways. In the boreal region of Sweden (where Scots pine (P. sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) are the dominant native conifers), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) was introduced on a large scale about 40 years ago. [\n] Our review of current knowledge on the lodgepole pine suggests ...

 

The introduction of lodgepole pine as a major forest crop in Sweden: implications for host-pathogen evolution

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 85-96, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00491-6

Abstract

Theoretical and experimental investigations of natural selection in host–pathogen systems are reviewed and the general principles emerging from these studies are used to analyse the possible pathogenic consequences of introducing lodgepole pine into Sweden. Introduction of lodgepole pine alone is likely to pose a relatively low disease risk for native forests. The possible evolution of more aggressive populations of native Scots pine pathogens on highly stressed lodgepole pine plantations is, nevertheless, of some concern. These pathogens could, subsequently, transfer back on ...

 

Insects on lodgepole pine in Sweden - current knowledge and potential risks

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 107-116, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00494-1

Abstract

Eighty species of forest insects have thus far been recorded feeding on lodgepole pine in the Nordic countries (61 in Sweden). The list includes species that have Scots pine as their main host and which feed on needles, flowers, cones, and shoots, as well as species boring in the phloem and xylem of dead or dying Norway spruce. Contrary to our expectations, most of the insect species that have colonised lodgepole pine in Sweden can be considered specialists (with regard to ...

 

A landscape perspective on the establishment of exotic tree plantations: lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) in Sweden

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 141, No. 1-2. (February 2001), pp. 131-142, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00496-5

Abstract

This paper reviews some of the potential effects of plantations of the North American lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) on landscapes in Sweden dominated by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Norway spruce (Picea abies), and, after major disturbances, by several deciduous trees (Betula pendula, B. pubescens and, less commonly, Populus tremula). Also, we determine the proportions of a specific landscape in Sweden that are at varying distances from lodgepole pine and the degree to which landscape fragmentation may be increased by lodgepole pine ...

 

Investigating the effects of large wood and forest management on flood risk and flood hydrology

  

Abstract

The changes to catchment scale flood risk following river restoration works, including the addition of large wood logjams to the channel, are poorly quantified in the literature. Key concerns following river restoration for river managers and other stakeholders are changes to flood hydrology at the reach and catchment scale and changes in the mobility of large wood pieces. The effects of accumulations of large wood (logjams) on local flood hydrology have been documented in the literature, showing logjams slow flood wave ...

 

Predicting plant species richness in a managed forest

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 180, No. 1-3. (July 2003), pp. 583-593, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(02)00646-1

Abstract

This paper describes an attempt to predict ground flora species richness under various forest management scenarios. The approach is based on a geographic information system (GIS) and uses three standard map layers of topography, soils and stands to derive environmental gradients of light, nutrients, water and disturbance. A simple floristic survey provides the data necessary to relate plant distribution with environmental variables. The potential distribution of 60 understorey plant species is modelled based on the four derived gradients. The sum of ...

 

Anthropogenic disturbance and tree diversity in Montane Rain Forests in Chiapas, Mexico

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 154, No. 1-2. (15 November 2001), pp. 311-326, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1127(00)00639-3

Abstract

We studied the influence of anthropogenic disturbance on forest structure and composition in the highly populated Montane Rain Forests of northern Chiapas, Mexico. We evaluated species richness, basal area and stem density on 81 circular plots (0.1 ha each) along a categorical disturbance gradient due to forest extraction, livestock grazing, and fires. A total of 116 tree species (>5 cm DBH) were recorded in three major forest types recognized by TWINSPAN. The three forest types were: Quercus–Podocarpus Forest (QPF), Pinus–Quercus–Liquidambar Forest (PQLF), and ...

 

Post-fire legacy of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in the Swedish boreal forest in relation to fire severity and logging intensity

  
Biological Conservation, Vol. 100, No. 2. (August 2001), pp. 151-161, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-3207(00)00230-5

Abstract

Swedish foresters are placing increasing reliance in burning of forestland and green tree retention, in order to enhance biodiversity in the Swedish boreal forests. However, much remains to be learned about how to optimise nature conservation goals by different logging and burning procedures. We monitored the survival of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi as mycorrhizas, at a clear-cut, a seed tree stand and an uncut stand of Scots pine in central Sweden, with and without burning at two levels of fire severity. The ...

 

Characteristics of Norway spruce trees (Picea abies) surviving a spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) outbreak

  
Trees - Structure and Function In Trees, Vol. 25, No. 6. (24 May 2011), pp. 965-973, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00468-011-0571-9

Abstract

The characteristics of spruce individuals, which survived a massive bark beetle outbreak, were compared with the characteristics of neighbouring attacked trees in Šumava National Park (Czech Republic). Selected parameters related to crown geometry, stand conditions and distances between trees were measured or estimated. Significant differences were found between the surviving trees and the neighbouring trees attacked by I. typographus. Trees with a higher level of stem shading (longer crown length) tended to survive. The attacked trees were usually located in areas ...

 

Improving biodiversity indicators of sustainable forest management: tree genus abundance rather than tree genus richness and dominance for understory vegetation in French lowland oak hornbeam forests

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 258 (06 December 2009), pp. S176-S186, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2009.09.004

Abstract

Two different biodiversity indicators based on tree species diversity are being used, in Europe and France respectively, without strong prior scientific validation: (1) tree species or genus richness as a positive indicator, and (2) relative abundance of the main species (“dominance”) as a negative indicator. We tested the relevance of these ecological models as indicators of understory vegetation biodiversity by comparing them to other ecological models, mainly related to tree species composition and abundance. We developed Bayesian statistical models for richness ...

 

Erasing a European biodiversity hot-spot: open woodlands, veteran trees and mature forests succumb to forestry intensification, succession, and logging in a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve

  
Journal for Nature Conservation, Vol. 22, No. 1. (February 2014), pp. 35-41, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2013.08.002

Abstract

Open woodlands are among the biologically richest habitats of the temperate zone. Although open woodlands were much more common in the past and covered large areas of Europe, their original cover and magnitude of their loss remain mostly unknown. Here, we quantify the loss of open woodlands and assess the potential for their restoration in an internationally protected biodiversity hot-spot, floodplain woodlands of lower Thaya and March rivers of Dolní Morava UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in Czech Republic. Aerial photographs from years ...

 

A meta-analysis of the effect of forest management for timber on understory plant species diversity in temperate forests

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 303 (September 2013), pp. 81-90, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.04.009

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We synthesized data from 100 studies to examine understory response to forest harvesting. [::] Across all studies there was no significant effect from timber harvesting on understory richness. [::] Selection harvesting had a positive effect on understory species richness. [::] Even-aged silvicultural treatments showed effects after 50 years or more, while early successional stages did not. [::] Thinning treatments had no effect on understory richness. [Abstract] Many studies have examined affects of forest management—particularly regeneration treatments—for timber on understory plant diversity. These studies taken independently show ...

 

Forestry application of the AHP by use of MPC© software

  
Forest Systems, Vol. 21, No. 3. (28 November 2012), 418, https://doi.org/10.5424/fs/2012213-02641

Abstract

We present an example of the application of the AHP decision-making approach to forest management, by use of MPC© 2.0 software. The example considered is that of a forest services company interested in buying a timber harvester. The company had preselected four different machines as possible alternatives, and established 11 different criteria involved in the decision, grouped into four categories (economic, environmental, social and technical). The decision-making process was undertaken using MPC© 2.0 software tools, which enable establishment of criteria on ...

 

Forest landscape change and biodiversity conservation

  
In Forest Landscapes and Global Change (2014), pp. 167-198, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0953-7_7

Abstract

Forest landscapes are changing at unprecedented rates in many regions of the world. This may have profound consequences for the diversity and resilience of forest ecosystems and may impose considerable challenges for their management. In this chapter, we review the different types of change that can occur in a forest landscape, including modifications in forest habitat amount, quality, fragmentation, connectivity, and heterogeneity. We describe the conceptual differences and potential interactions among these changes and provide a summary of the possible responses ...

 

EucaTool®, a cloud computing application for estimating the growth and production of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. plantations in Galicia (NW Spain)

  
Forest Systems, Vol. 24, No. 3. (03 December 2015), eRC06, https://doi.org/10.5424/fs/2015243-07865

Abstract

[Aim of study] To present the software utilities and explain how to use EucaTool®, a free cloud computing application developed to estimate the growth and production of seedling and clonal blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.) plantations in Galicia (NW Spain). [Area of study] Galicia (NW Spain). [Material and methods] EucaTool® implements a dynamic growth and production model that is valid for clonal and non-clonal blue gum plantations in the region. The model integrates transition functions for dominant height (site index curves), number of ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 14

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: forest-fires   forest-floor-low-light-availability   forest-focus   forest-focus-monitoring   forest-inventories   forest-land-reclamation   forest-loss   forest-management   forest-pathogens   forest-pests   forest-product   forest-regeneration   forest-reproductive-material   forest-resource-information   forest-resources   forest-species   forest-species-composition   forest-structure   forest-succession   forest-types   forest-watering   forestcommunities   forestry   forestry-statistics   fortran   fossil-energy   fossil-resources   fp7-european-research-project   fracking   fractal   fragmentation   fragmented-world   frainetto   france   frangula-alnus   frangula-spp   fraxinus   fraxinus-angustifolia   fraxinus-augustifolia   fraxinus-excelsior   fraxinus-mandshurica   fraxinus-ornus   fraxinus-pennsylvanica   fraxinus-spp   free-access   free-access-book   free-riders   free-science-metrics   free-scientific-knowledge   free-scientific-software   free-software   free-software-directory   free-software-license-definition   freedom   freemat   french-alps   frequency   frost-resistance   frost-sensitivity   fruticosa   fuel   fuel-moisture   fuelwood   functional-connectivity   functional-descriptors   functional-programming   functional-traits   fungal-decay   fungal-diseases   fungi   fusarium-circinatum   fusarium-lateritium   future   future-climatic-envelopes   future-earth   future-internet   future-trends   fuzzy   gaia   galanthus-plicatus   galicia   gall-attributes   game-theory   gardening   gargano   garrulus-glandarius   gbif   gc-ms   gcm   gdal   gemmae-populi   gender-biases   gene-bank   gene-conservation   general-relation   generalized-additive-model   generalized-additive-models   generalized-linear-model   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Commission staff working document - Document accompanying the Communication from the Commission to the Council, The European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection - Impact assessment of the thematic strategy on soil protection

  
Commission Staff Working Document, Vol. 2006, No. SEC/2006/0620. (22 September 2006)

Abstract

[Excerpt:Conclusions] Different Community policies contribute to soil protection, particularly environment (e.g. air and water) and agricultural (agri-environment and cross-compliance) policy. For instance, land management practices such as organic and integrated farming or extensive agricultural practices in mountain areas can maintain and enhance organic matter in the soil and prevent landslides respectively. [\n] Achieving the objectives of the Water Framework Directive will entail changes in practices in soil management and the protection of some soils, but only where soil degradation hinders water quality. It ...

 

European forest ecosystems - State and trends

  
Vol. 5/2016 (21 March 2016), https://doi.org/10.2800/964893

Abstract

[Executive summary] The importance of forests with regard to supporting human needs is considerable. [\n] Forests are rich in biodiversity and valuable for recreation, water regulation and soil protection. [\n] As well as for providing timber and other non-wood forest products, forests are important for mitigating climate change and for the renewable energy sector. [\n] Forest ecosystems are exposed to a range of environmental, economic and social pressures that challenge their sustainability. The forest sector is influenced by the unprecedented pressures arising from climate change and the growing demands of society on natural resources. ...

References

  1. Agenda 21, 2016. http://rod.eionet.europa.eu/instruments/573 , accessed 25 February 2016.
  2. Adams, M. A., 2013. Mega-fires, tipping points and ecosystem services: Managing forests and woodlands in an uncertain future. Forest Ecology and Management, 294, 250–261. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2012.11.039 .
  3. Aggestam, F., Weiss, G., 2011. An updated and further elaborated policy database and a tested prototype of policy analysis interface for ToSIA, EFI Technical Report 38, European Forest Institute, Joensuu.
 

The wind stability of different silvicultural systems for Douglas-fir in the Netherlands: a model-based approach

  
Forestry, Vol. 81, No. 3. (2008), pp. 399-414, https://doi.org/10.1093/forestry/cpn028

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate different silvicultural systems for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Netherlands in terms of timber production and wind stability over a full rotation. This was done using the forest genetics, ecology, management and wind model (ForGEM-W), which combines a distant dependent tree growth simulator with a mechanical–empirical wind damage module. Six different silvicultural systems were evaluated: normal yield table management, free thinning from above in a monospecies and a mixed stand (50 ...

 

Forest management facing climate change - an ecosystem model analysis of adaptation strategies

  
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Vol. 20, No. 2. (2013), pp. 201-220, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11027-013-9487-6

Abstract

To adapt to climate change, forest managers request information on management options for obtaining environmental, societal and economic goals. In this study, we assess the potential of adaptive forest management to influence the productivity and storm sensitivity of nemoral and boreal forest. The forest growth across Sweden over the 21st century was simulated by the ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS, comparing four management options: 1) default forest management, 2) shorter rotation period 3) increased fraction of broadleaved trees and 4) continuous cover forestry. ...

 

Climate change and European forests: what do we know, what are the uncertainties, and what are the implications for forest management?

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 146 (2014), pp. 69-83, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.07.030

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Uncertainty is inherent to climate change impact assessments. [::] Extreme events are only weakly represented in many assessments. [::] The range of possible impacts has so far been underestimated in most studies. [::] Some general trends are common to all climate projections. [::] Guidance is needed to interpret state-of-the-art knowledge and give helpful advice. [Abstract] The knowledge about potential climate change impacts on forests is continuously expanding and some changes in growth, drought induced mortality and species distribution have been observed. However despite a significant body ...

 

Nature vs. nurture: managing relationships between forests, agroforestry and wild biodiversity

  
Agroforestry Systems, Vol. 61-62, No. 1-3. (2004), pp. 155-165, https://doi.org/10.1023/b%3aagfo.0000028996.92553.ea

Abstract

Many agroforestry systems are found in places that otherwise would be appropriate for natural forests, and often have replaced them. Humans have had a profound influence on forests virtually everywhere they both are found. Thus ‘natural’ defined as ‘without human influence’ is a hypothetical construct, though one that has assumed mythological value among many conservationists. Biodiversity is a forest value that does not carry a market price. It is the foundation, however, upon which productive systems depend. The relationship between agroforestry ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/forest-management

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.