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Selection: with tag food-security [44 articles] 

 

Natural climate solutions

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (16 October 2017), 201710465, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1710465114

Abstract

[Significance] Most nations recently agreed to hold global average temperature rise to well below 2 °C. We examine how much climate mitigation nature can contribute to this goal with a comprehensive analysis of “natural climate solutions” (NCS): 20 conservation, restoration, and/or improved land management actions that increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions across global forests, wetlands, grasslands, and agricultural lands. We show that NCS can provide over one-third of the cost-effective climate mitigation needed between now and 2030 to stabilize ...

 

The impact of hunting on tropical mammal and bird populations

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6334. (14 April 2017), pp. 180-183, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaj1891

Abstract

[Quantifying hunting-induced defaunation] As the human population grows and increasingly encroaches on remaining wildlife habitat, hunting threatens many species. Benítez-López et al. conducted a large-scale meta-analysis of hunting trends and impacts across the tropics (see the Perspective by Brashares and Gaynor). Bird and mammal populations were considerably lower in areas where hunting occurred. Although commercial hunting and proximity to roads and urban centers were the most damaging factors, all hunting had worrying impacts, even in protected areas. Protection and alternative approaches for ...

 

Bushmeat hunting and extinction risk to the world's mammals

  
Royal Society Open Science, Vol. 3, No. 10. (01 October 2016), 160498, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160498

Abstract

Terrestrial mammals are experiencing a massive collapse in their population sizes and geographical ranges around the world, but many of the drivers, patterns and consequences of this decline remain poorly understood. Here we provide an analysis showing that bushmeat hunting for mostly food and medicinal products is driving a global crisis whereby 301 terrestrial mammal species are threatened with extinction. Nearly all of these threatened species occur in developing countries where major coexisting threats include deforestation, agricultural expansion, human encroachment and ...

 

Biodiversity conservation: the key is reducing meat consumption

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 536 (December 2015), pp. 419-431, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.07.022

Abstract

The consumption of animal-sourced food products by humans is one of the most powerful negative forces affecting the conservation of terrestrial ecosystems and biological diversity. Livestock production is the single largest driver of habitat loss, and both livestock and feedstock production are increasing in developing tropical countries where the majority of biological diversity resides. Bushmeat consumption in Africa and southeastern Asia, as well as the high growth-rate of per capita livestock consumption in China are of special concern. The projected land ...

 

Mapping indicators of female welfare at high spatial resolution

  
(2017)

Abstract

Improved understanding of geographic variation and inequity in health status, wealth, and access to resources within countries is increasingly being recognized as central to meeting development goals. Development and health indicators assessed at national scales conceal important inequities, with the rural poor often least well represented. High-resolution data on key social and health indicators are fundamental for targeting limited resources, especially where development funding has recently come under increased pressure. Globally, around 80% of countries regularly produce sex-disaggregated statistics at a ...

References

  1. Alegana, V.A., Atkinson, P.M., Pezzulo, C., Sorichetta, A., Weiss, D., Bird, T., ErbachSchoenberg, E., Tatem, A.J., 2015. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 12 (105), 20150073+. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2015.0073 .
  2. Banerjee, S., Gelfand, A.E., Polasek, W., 2000. Geostatistical modelling for spatial interaction data with application to postal service performance. Journal of statistical planning and inference 90(1), 87-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-3758(00)00111-7 .
 

Exploring the high-resolution mapping of gender-disaggregated development indicators

  
Journal of The Royal Society Interface, Vol. 14, No. 129. (05 April 2017), 20160825, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2016.0825

Abstract

Improved understanding of geographical variation and inequity in health status, wealth and access to resources within countries is increasingly being recognized as central to meeting development goals. Development and health indicators assessed at national or subnational scale can often conceal important inequities, with the rural poor often least well represented. The ability to target limited resources is fundamental, especially in an international context where funding for health and development comes under pressure. This has recently prompted the exploration of the potential ...

 

Supplementary Information from Exploring the high-resolution mapping of gender disaggregated development indicators

  

Abstract

[Excerpt: Datasets] The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) is a program of national household surveys implemented across a large number of LMICs. The DHS Program collects and analyses data on population demographic and health characteristics through more than 300 surveys in over 90 countries. The gender-disaggregated data we investigated in this report come from DHS datasets. [\n] [...] [Models specification] [::Bayesian model specification] The Gaussian Function (GF) in INLA is represented as a Gaussian Markov Random Function (GMRF). Computations in INLA are carried out using the GMRF by approximating a ...

References

  1. Alegana, V.A., Atkinson, P.M., Pezzulo, C., Sorichetta, A., Weiss, D., Bird, T., ErbachSchoenberg, E., Tatem, A.J., 2015. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 12 (105), 20150073+. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2015.0073 .
  2. Bosco, C., de Rigo, D., Dijkstra, T.A., Sander, G., Wasowski, J., 2013. Multi-scale robust modelling of landslide susceptibility: regional rapid assessment and catchment robust fuzzy ensemble. IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology
 

Waste not, want not, emit less

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6284. (21 April 2016), pp. 408-409, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf2978

Abstract

[Summary] Ensuring a sufficient supply of quality food for a growing human population is a major challenge, aggravated by climate change and already-strained natural resources. Food security requires production of some food surpluses to safeguard against unpredictable fluctuations (1). However, when food is wasted, not only has carbon been emitted to no avail, but disposal and decomposition in landfills create additional environmental impacts. Decreasing the current high scale of food waste is thus crucial for achieving resource-efficient, sustainable food systems (2). But, ...

 

Beneficial biofuels - The food, energy, and environment trilemma

  
Science, Vol. 325, No. 5938. (2009), pp. 270-271, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1177970

Abstract

[Summary] Recent analyses of the energy and greenhouse-gas performance of alternative biofuels have ignited a controversy that may be best resolved by applying two simple principles. In a world seeking solutions to its energy, environmental, and food challenges, society cannot afford to miss out on the global greenhouse-gas emission reductions and the local environmental and societal benefits when biofuels are done right. However, society also cannot accept the undesirable impacts of biofuels done wrong. ...

 

Breeding technologies to increase crop production in a changing world

  
Science, Vol. 327, No. 5967. (2010), pp. 818-822, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183700

Abstract

To feed the several billion people living on this planet, the production of high-quality food must increase with reduced inputs, but this accomplishment will be particularly challenging in the face of global environmental change. Plant breeders need to focus on traits with the greatest potential to increase yield. Hence, new technologies must be developed to accelerate breeding through improving genotyping and phenotyping methods and by increasing the available genetic diversity in breeding germplasm. The most gain will come from delivering these ...

 

Climate change impacts on global food security

  
Science, Vol. 341, No. 6145. (2013), pp. 508-513, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1239402

Abstract

Climate change could potentially interrupt progress toward a world without hunger. A robust and coherent global pattern is discernible of the impacts of climate change on crop productivity that could have consequences for food availability. The stability of whole food systems may be at risk under climate change because of short-term variability in supply. However, the potential impact is less clear at regional scales, but it is likely that climate variability and change will exacerbate food insecurity in areas currently vulnerable ...

 

Climate change will affect the Asian water towers

  
Science, Vol. 328, No. 5984. (2010), pp. 1382-1385, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183188

Abstract

More than 1.4 billion people depend on water from the Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra, Yangtze, and Yellow rivers. Upstream snow and ice reserves of these basins, important in sustaining seasonal water availability, are likely to be affected substantially by climate change, but to what extent is yet unclear. Here, we show that meltwater is extremely important in the Indus basin and important for the Brahmaputra basin, but plays only a modest role for the Ganges, Yangtze, and Yellow rivers. A huge difference ...

 

Do biofuel policies seek to cut emissions by cutting food?

  
Science, Vol. 347, No. 6229. (2015), pp. 1420-1422, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1261221

Abstract

Debates about biofuels tend to focus separately on estimates of adverse effects on food security, poverty, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions driven by land-use change (LUC) (1–4). These estimates often rely on global agriculture and land-use models. Because models differ substantially in their estimates of each of these adverse effects (2, 3, 5), some argue that each individual effect is too uncertain to influence policy (6, 7). Yet these arguments fail to recognize the trade-offs; much of the uncertainty is only ...

 

Exploring the biophysical option space for feeding the world without deforestation

  
Nature Communications, Vol. 7 (19 April 2016), 11382, https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11382

Abstract

Safeguarding the world’s remaining forests is a high-priority goal. We assess the biophysical option space for feeding the world in 2050 in a hypothetical zero-deforestation world. We systematically combine realistic assumptions on future yields, agricultural areas, livestock feed and human diets. For each scenario, we determine whether the supply of crop products meets the demand and whether the grazing intensity stays within plausible limits. We find that many options exist to meet the global food supply in 2050 without deforestation, even ...

Visual summary



 

Feeding the future

  
Science, Vol. 327, No. 5967. (2010), pp. 797-797, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.327.5967.797

Abstract

[Excerpt] Feeding the 9 billion people expected to inhabit our planet by 2050 will be an unprecedented challenge. This special issue examines the obstacles to achieving global food security and some promising solutions. News articles take us into the fields, introducing farmers and researchers who are finding ways to boost harvests, especially in the developing world. Reviews, Perspectives, a special single-topic podcast, and an audio interview done by a high school intern provide a broader context for the causes and effects ...

 

Food for thought: lower-than-expected crop yield stimulation with rising CO2 concentrations

  
Science, Vol. 312, No. 5782. (2006), pp. 1918-1921, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1114722

Abstract

Model projections suggest that although increased temperature and decreased soil moisture will act to reduce global crop yields by 2050, the direct fertilization effect of rising carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) will offset these losses. The CO2 fertilization factors used in models to project future yields were derived from enclosure studies conducted approximately 20 years ago. Free-air concentration enrichment (FACE) technology has now facilitated large-scale trials of the major grain crops at elevated [CO2] under fully open-air field conditions. In those trials, ...

 

Historical warnings of future food insecurity with unprecedented seasonal heat

  
Science, Vol. 323, No. 5911. (2009), pp. 240-244, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1164363

Abstract

Higher growing season temperatures can have dramatic impacts on agricultural productivity, farm incomes, and food security. We used observational data and output from 23 global climate models to show a high probability (>90%) that growing season temperatures in the tropics and subtropics by the end of the 21st century will exceed the most extreme seasonal temperatures recorded from 1900 to 2006. In temperate regions, the hottest seasons on record will represent the future norm in many locations. We used historical examples ...

 

Global food security: challenges and policies

  
Science, Vol. 302, No. 5652. (2003), pp. 1917-1919, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1092958

Abstract

Global food security will remain a worldwide concern for the next 50 years and beyond. Recently, crop yield has fallen in many areas because of declining investments in research and infrastructure, as well as increasing water scarcity. Climate change and HIV/AIDS are also crucial factors affecting food security in many regions. Although agroecological approaches offer some promise for improving yields, food security in developing countries could be substantially improved by increased investment and policy reforms. ...

 

How big a role should neonicotinoids play in food security?

  
Science, Vol. 340, No. 6133. (2013), pp. 675-675, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.340.6133.675

Abstract

Proponents of neonicotinoid-treated seeds claim that the chemicals offer many benefits besides killing pests, including improved plant vigor and higher yields. But how important are neonicotinoid seed treatments for agriculture? ...

 

Precision agriculture and food security

  
Science, Vol. 327, No. 5967. (2010), pp. 828-831, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183899

Abstract

Precision agriculture comprises a set of technologies that combines sensors, information systems, enhanced machinery, and informed management to optimize production by accounting for variability and uncertainties within agricultural systems. Adapting production inputs site-specifically within a field and individually for each animal allows better use of resources to maintain the quality of the environment while improving the sustainability of the food supply. Precision agriculture provides a means to monitor the food production chain and manage both the quantity and quality of agricultural ...

 

Prioritizing climate change adaptation needs for food security in 2030

  
Science, Vol. 319, No. 5863. (2008), pp. 607-610, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1152339

Abstract

Investments aimed at improving agricultural adaptation to climate change inevitably favor some crops and regions over others. An analysis of climate risks for crops in 12 food-insecure regions was conducted to identify adaptation priorities, based on statistical crop models and climate projections for 2030 from 20 general circulation models. Results indicate South Asia and Southern Africa as two regions that, without sufficient adaptation measures, will likely suffer negative impacts on several crops that are important to large food-insecure human populations. We ...

 

Reconciling food production and biodiversity conservation: land sharing and land sparing compared

  
Science, Vol. 333, No. 6047. (2011), pp. 1289-1291, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1208742

Abstract

The question of how to meet rising food demand at the least cost to biodiversity requires the evaluation of two contrasting alternatives: land sharing, which integrates both objectives on the same land; and land sparing, in which high-yield farming is combined with protecting natural habitats from conversion to agriculture. To test these alternatives, we compared crop yields and densities of bird and tree species across gradients of agricultural intensity in southwest Ghana and northern India. More species were negatively affected by ...

 

Leverage points for improving global food security and the environment

  
Science, Vol. 345, No. 6194. (2014), pp. 325-328, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1246067

Abstract

[How to optimize global food production] Keeping societies stable and managing Earth's resources sustainably depend on doing a good, steady job producing and distributing food. West et al. asked what combinations of crops and regions offer the best chance of progress. Their analysis focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, nutrient pollution, water use, and food waste. They identify regions that are likely to yield the best balance between applying fertilizer to increase crop yields versus the resulting environmental impact. [Abstract] Achieving sustainable global food ...

 

Mixed messages on prices and food security

  
Science, Vol. 335, No. 6067. (2012), pp. 405-406, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1210806

Abstract

[Summary] Spikes in food prices have pushed food security to the top of the global policy agenda. Price increases have mixed effects on poverty and hunger: They increase the cost of food for consumers but increase incomes of farmers, who represent the bulk of the world's poor. Net effects will differ depending on whether poor households or countries buy or import, or sell or export food (infrastructure, institutions, and market imperfections will play roles, as well) (1–4). Policies to influence prices imply ...

 

Tropical soils and food aecurity: the next 50 years

  
Science, Vol. 302, No. 5649. (2003), pp. 1356-1359, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1088579

Abstract

An appreciation of the dynamism of the links between soil resources and society provides a platform for examining food security over the next 50 years. Interventions to reverse declining trends in food security must recognize the variable resilience and sensitivity of major tropical soil types. In most agro-ecosystems, declining crop yield is exponentially related to loss of soil quality. For the majority smallholder (subsistence) farmers, investments to reverse degradation are primarily driven by private benefit, socially or financially. "Tragedy of the ...

 

Evaluation of Skåne County's capacity to be self-sufficient in foodstuffproduction: now and for the years 2030 and 2050

  
Vol. 242 (2015)

Abstract

Sweden is becoming increasingly dependent on the import of foodstuffs from a globalfood system that is unsustainable due to its responsibility for environmental degradation and itsdependency on finite resources like fertilizers and fossil fuels. The diminishing ability to be selfsufficientin a time when peak oil, climate change, environmental degradation, exponentialpopulation growth, and a troublesome global economy might reshape the structures of the currentsystems, in a not so distant future, could be a cause for great worry. Skåne County has functioned asa ...

 

Resilience and reactivity of global food security

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 22. (02 June 2015), pp. 6902-6907, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1507366112

Abstract

[Significance] The past few decades have seen an intensification of international food trade and the increase in the number of countries that depend on food imports. As an effect of the associated globalization of food, local shocks in food production, combined with the adoption of new national or regional energy and trade policies, have recently led to global food crises. Here we develop a framework to investigate the coupled global food–population dynamics, and evaluate the effect of international trade on global food ...

 

Land take and food security: assessment of land take on the agricultural production in Europe

  
Journal of Environmental Planning and Management (17 April 2014), pp. 1-15, https://doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2014.899490

Abstract

Soil is a multifunctional, non-renewable natural resource for Europe as clearly expressed in the European Union (EU) Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection (COM (2006)231). Soil carries out multiple functions, including the support of food production. Urban development and its associated land take poses a major threat to soil and could have significant effects on agricultural production. This paper aims to evaluate the potential productivity losses in European agriculture due to land-take processes between 1990 and 2006. Agricultural land take was calculated ...

 

In new report, IPCC gets more specific about warming risks

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6179. (4 April 2014), pp. 21-21, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6179.21

Abstract

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) 31 March report on climate impacts and adaptation echoes many of the concerns raised by the last edition, issued in 2007. It says that climate change is already affecting human communities, agriculture, and natural ecosystems—and impacts are likely to grow in the future. But the report breaks with the past in drawing on an emerging body of social science to identify eight major risks posed by climate change, and to inform an extensive discussion ...

 

China gets serious about its pollutant-laden soil

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6178. (28 March 2014), pp. 1415-1416, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.343.6178.1415

Abstract

A recent national survey found that 2.5% of China's arable land is too contaminated to grow food safely. The survey's details were so alarming that they were declared a "state secret." Now, the central government appears eager to tackle the problem; China's latest 5-year plan singles out five industries as egregious soil polluters and sets a target to reduce, by 2015, discharges of heavy metals by 15% from 2007 levels. ...

 

Reply to Feeley and Machovina: trophic ecology complements estimates of land use change due to food production

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 9. (04 March 2014), pp. E795-E795, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1324144111

Abstract

[Excerpt] Feeley and Machovina assert that even though humans occupy a low trophic level, we have larger ecosystem impacts than any other species because of the sheer volume of food consumed (linked to population size) and the inefficiency of its production (1). The authors argue that large differences in the impact on resource use exist between dietary preferences (e.g., differing proportions of beef, pork, or poultry in a diet), even if human diets are represented by the same trophic level. We are ...

 

Increasing preference for beef magnifies human impact on world’s food web

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 9. (04 March 2014), pp. E794-E794, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1323071111

Abstract

Bonhommeau et al.’s report, “Eating up the world’s food web and the human trophic level” (1), provides a valuable perspective on the role of human food consumption within the global ecosystem. However, the ranking of human beings at a similar trophic level as other animals downplays the effects that humans have on the Earth in comparison with other species. The sheer volume of food consumed by humans and our growing preference for inefficient food sources cause us to have increasingly disproportionate ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 13

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: extrapolation-error   extreme-events   extreme-weather   f-script   fabaceae   factor-analysis   fagus-crenata   fagus-engleriana   fagus-grandifolia   fagus-hayatae   fagus-japonica   fagus-longipetiolata   fagus-lucida   fagus-mexicana   fagus-moesiaca   fagus-multinervis   fagus-orientalis   fagus-silvatica   fagus-spp   fagus-sylvatica   fagus-taurica   faidherbia-albida   fallopia-spp   false-observations-propagation   false-positive   family-heritability   fao-ecozones   faostat   fapar   feather-moss   featured-publication   feedback   feedforward-networks   fennoscandia   fertile-islands   fertilization   ficus-altissima   ficus-aurea   ficus-benghalensis   ficus-carica   ficus-citrifolia   ficus-elastica   ficus-macrophylla   ficus-religiosa   field-measurements   filbert   financial-modelling   fine-roots   finland   fir-decline   fire   fire-ecology   fire-emissions   fire-fuel   fire-regimes   fire-season   fire-severity   fise   fish-resources   fitness   fitzroya-cupressoides   flagship-species   flammability   flash-flood   fleshy-fruit   flood-control   flood-frequency   flood-tolerance   flooding-tolerance   floodplain   floodplain-forest   floods   flora   floss   flow-accumulation   flowering-period   flowering-phenology   fluvial   fodder-tree   foliage   food-plant   food-security   food-web   forecast   forest-bioeconomy   forest-biomass   forest-classification   forest-communities   forest-conservation   forest-conversion   forest-damage   forest-degradation   forest-disturbance   forest-dynamics   forest-ecology   forest-ecosystem   forest-ecosystems   forest-edges   inrmm-list-of-tags   postfire-recovery  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Taking a bite out of biodiversity

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6173. (21 February 2014), pp. 838-838, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.343.6173.838-a

Abstract

[excerpt] In the Review “Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores” (10 January, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1241484), W. J. Ripple et al. claim that meat consumption by humans is one of many threats to carnivores and biodiversity. We argue that human carnivory is in fact the single greatest threat to overall biodiversity. Livestock production accounts for up to 75% of all agricultural lands and 30% of Earth's land surface, making it the single largest anthropogenic land use. Meat and feedstock production ...

 

Invasive alien species in the food chain: advancing risk assessment models to address climate change, economics and uncertainty

  
NeoBiota, Vol. 18 (13 September 2013), pp. 1-7, https://doi.org/10.3897/neobiota.18.6108

Abstract

[Excerpt] Economic globalization depends on the movement of people and goods between countries. As these exchanges increase, so does the potential for translocation of harmful pests, weeds, and pathogens capable of impacting our crops, livestock and natural resources (Hulme 2009), with concomitant impacts on global food security (Cook et al. 2011). [\n] Potential invasions by alien species create a dilemma for nations that engage in international trade. On one hand, free trade may provide new markets for producers, cheaper and more diverse ...

References

  1. Baker, R.H.A., Benninga, J., Bremmer, J., Brunel, S., Dupin, M., Eyre, D., Ilieva, Z., Jarošík, V., Kehlenbeck, H., Kriticos, D.J., Makowski, D., Pergl, J., Reynaud, P., Robinet, C., Soliman, T., Van der Werf, W., Worner, S.P., 2012. A decision support scheme for mapping endangered areas in pest risk analysis. EPPO Bulletin 42, 65-73.
  2. Baker, R.H.A., Eyre, D., Brunel, S., 2013. Matching methods to produce maps for pest risk analysis to resources. In: Kriticos, D.J.,
 

Soil erosion impact on agronomic productivity and environment quality

  
Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, Vol. 17, No. 4. (1 July 1998), pp. 319-464, https://doi.org/10.1080/07352689891304249

Abstract

Soil erosion is a global issue because of its severe adverse economic and environmental impacts. Economic impacts on productivity may be due to direct effects on crops/plants on-site and off-site, and environmental consequences are primarily off-site due either to pollution of natural waters or adverse effects on air quality due to dust and emissions of radiatively active gases. Off-site economic effects of erosion are related to the damage to civil structure, siltation of water ways and reservoirs, and additional costs involved ...

 

Crop pests and pathogens move polewards in a warming world

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 11. (1 September 2013), pp. 985-988, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1990

Abstract

Global food security is threatened by the emergence and spread of crop pests and pathogens. Spread is facilitated primarily by human transportation, but there is increasing concern that climate change allows establishment in hitherto unsuitable regions. However, interactions between climate change, crops and pests are complex, and the extent to which crop pests and pathogens have altered their latitudinal ranges in response to global warming is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate an average poleward shift of 2.7±0.8 km yr−1 since 1960, in observations ...

 

Ten principles for a landscape approach to reconciling agriculture, conservation, and other competing land uses

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, No. 21. (21 May 2013), pp. 8349-8356, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1210595110

Abstract

“Landscape approaches” seek to provide tools and concepts for allocating and managing land to achieve social, economic, and environmental objectives in areas where agriculture, mining, and other productive land uses compete with environmental and biodiversity goals. Here we synthesize the current consensus on landscape approaches. This is based on published literature and a consensus-building process to define good practice and is validated by a survey of practitioners. We find the landscape approach has been refined in response to increasing societal concerns ...

 

Agriculture: feeding the future

  
Nature, Vol. 499, No. 7456. (4 July 2013), pp. 23-24, https://doi.org/10.1038/499023a

Abstract

We must mine the biodiversity in seed banks to help to overcome food shortages, urge Susan McCouch and colleagues. ...

 

Current challenges and trends in the discovery of agrochemicals

  
Science, Vol. 341, No. 6147. (16 August 2013), pp. 742-746, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1237227

Abstract

Crop protection chemistry has come a long way from its “alchemic” beginnings in the late 19th century to a high-tech science that supports the sustainable production of food, feed, and fiber for a rapidly growing population. Cutting-edge developments in the design and synthesis of agrochemicals help to tackle today’s challenges of weed and pest resistance, higher regulatory safety margins, and higher cost of goods with the invention of selective, environmentally benign, low use rate, and cost-effective active ingredients. ...

 

Energy from biomass: the size of the global resource - An assessment of the evidence that biomass can make a major contribution to future global energy supply

  
(2011)

Abstract

Executive summary: Why this report? Many future energy scenarios indicate a prominent role for bio-energy (fuels, heat and power from biological matter or biomass), but there is significant controversy around the potential contribution of biomass to global energy production. This stems from the environmental and social risks that could be associated with producing biomass. Concerns include the sustainability of increasing crop yields and intensifying agriculture, the prospect that competition for land will impact on food production, and the potential for environmentally damaging land use change. The controversy surrounding ...

 

Environmental and economic costs of soil erosion and conservation benefits

  
Science, Vol. 267, No. 5201. (24 February 1995), pp. 1117-1123, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.267.5201.1117

Abstract

Soil erosion is a major environmental threat to the sustainability and productive capacity of agriculture. During the last 40 years, nearly one-third of the world's arable land has been lost by erosion and continues to be lost at a rate of more than 10 million hectares per year. With the addition of a quarter of a million people each day, the world population's food demand is increasing at a time when per capita food productivity is beginning to decline. ...

 

Soil erosion: a food and environmental threat

  
Environment, Development and Sustainability In Environment, Development and Sustainability, Vol. 8, No. 1. (1 February 2006), pp. 119-137, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-005-1262-8

Abstract

Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and public health problems facing human society. Humans obtain more than 99.7% of their food (calories) from the land and less than 0.3% from the oceans and other aquatic ecosystems. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization reports that more than 3.7 billion people are ...

 

Global water crisis and future food security in an era of climate change

  
Food Policy, Vol. 35, No. 5. (15 October 2010), pp. 365-377, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2010.05.006

Abstract

Food policy should serve humanity by advancing the humane goals of eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. However, these goals have recently been challenged by emerging forces including climate change, water scarcity, the energy crisis as well as the credit crisis. This paper analyses the overall role of these forces and population growth in redefining global food security. Specifically, global water supply and demand as well as the linkages between water supply and food security are examined. The analysis reveals that the ...

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
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