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Selection: with tag fire-fuel [40 articles] 

 

Forest fires are changing: let’s change the fire management strategy

  
Forest@ - Rivista di Selvicoltura ed Ecologia Forestale, Vol. 14, No. 4. (31 August 2017), pp. 202-205, https://doi.org/10.3832/efor2537-014

Abstract

Forest fires in Italy are changing. More frequent heatwaves and drought increase the flammability of the vegetation; the abandonment of rural land produces 30.000 ha of newly afforested areas each year; and the wildland-urban interface is expanding with the sprawl of urbanized areas. However, forest fires are rarely understood and managed in their complexity. The public opinion is often misinformed on the causes and consequences of fires in the forest. Moreover, fire management relies almost exclusively on extinction and emergency response, ...

 

Precipitation dominates fire occurrence in Greece (1900–2010): its dual role in fuel build-up and dryness

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, Vol. 14, No. 1. (03 January 2014), pp. 21-32, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-14-21-2014

Abstract

Historical fire records and meteorological observations spanning over one century (1894–2010) were assembled in a database to collect long-term fire and weather data in Greece. Positive/negative events of fire occurrence on an annual basis were considered as the years where the annual values of the examined parameters were above (positive values) or below (negative values) the 95% confidence limits around the trend line of the corresponding parameter. To analyse the association of positive/negative events of fire occurrence with meteorological extremes, we ...

 

Building Rothermel fire behaviour fuel models by genetic algorithm optimisation

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 24, No. 3. (2015), 317, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf14097

Abstract

A method to build and calibrate custom fuel models was developed by linking genetic algorithms (GA) to the Rothermel fire spread model. GA randomly generates solutions of fuel model parameters to form an initial population. Solutions are validated against observations of fire rate of spread via a goodness-of-fit metric. The population is selected for its best members, crossed over and mutated within a range of model parameter values, until a satisfactory fitness is reached. We showed that GA improved the performance ...

 

Effects of invasive alien plants on fire regimes

  
BioScience, Vol. 54, No. 7. (2004), pp. 677-688, https://doi.org/10.1641/0006-3568(2004)054[0677:eoiapo]2.0.co;2

Abstract

Plant invasions are widely recognized as significant threats to biodiversity conservation worldwide. One way invasions can affect native ecosystems is by changing fuel properties, which can in turn affect fire behavior and, ultimately, alter fire regime characteristics such as frequency, intensity, extent, type, and seasonality of fire. If the regime changes subsequently promote the dominance of the invaders, then an invasive plant–fire regime cycle can be established. As more ecosystem components and interactions are altered, restoration of preinvasion conditions becomes more ...

 

Integrating social science research into wildland fire management

  
Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4. (29 July 2014), pp. 381-394, https://doi.org/10.1108/dpm-10-2013-0193

Abstract

Purpose – Social science research is used to support the formulation of natural resource management decisions with accurate and timely information. Due to risk and potential impacts, this is important in wildland fire management. The purpose of this paper is to identify the respondent perceptions of a natural disturbance agent's impact on fire management in Colorado and Wyoming. Design/methodology/approach – The research methodology included a self-administered questionnaire completed by a random sample of respondents in three study locations adjacent to national forests. A quantitative ...

 

Landscape - wildfire interactions in southern Europe: Implications for landscape management

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 92, No. 10. (October 2011), pp. 2389-2402, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2011.06.028

Abstract

[Abstract] Every year approximately half a million hectares of land are burned by wildfires in southern Europe, causing large ecological and socio-economic impacts. Climate and land use changes in the last decades have increased fire risk and danger. In this paper we review the available scientific knowledge on the relationships between landscape and wildfires in the Mediterranean region, with a focus on its application for defining landscape management guidelines and policies that could be adopted in order to promote landscapes with ...

 

Constraints on global fire activity vary across a resource gradient

  
Ecology, Vol. 92, No. 1. (2011), pp. 121-132, https://doi.org/10.1890/09-1843.1

Abstract

We provide an empirical, global test of the varying constraints hypothesis, which predicts systematic heterogeneity in the relative importance of biomass resources to burn and atmospheric conditions suitable to burning (weather/climate) across a spatial gradient of long-term resource availability. Analyses were based on relationships between monthly global wildfire activity, soil moisture, and mid-tropospheric circulation data from 2001 to 2007, synthesized across a gradient of long-term averages in resources (net primary productivity), annual temperature, and terrestrial biome.We demonstrate support for the varying ...

 

How drought-induced forest die-off alters microclimate and increases fuel loadings and fire potentials

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 25, No. 8. (2016), 819, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf15028

Abstract

Forest die-offs associated with drought and heat have recently occurred across the globe, raising concern that associated changes in fuels and microclimate could link initial die-off disturbance to subsequent fire disturbance. Despite widespread concern, little empirical data exist. Following forest die-off in the Northern Jarrah Forest, south-western Australia, we quantified fuel dynamics and associated microclimate for die-off and control plots. Sixteen months post die-off, die-off plots had significantly increased 1-h fuels (11.8 vs 9.8 tonnes ha–1) but not larger fuel classes ...

 

Does increased forest protection correspond to higher fire severity in frequent-fire forests of the western United States?

  
Ecosphere, Vol. 7, No. 10. (October 2016), e01492, https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1492

Abstract

There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly after decades of fire suppression. This view has led to recent proposals—both administrative and legislative—to reduce or eliminate forest protections and increase some forms of logging based on the belief that ...

 

The status of our scientific understanding of lodgepole pine and mountain pine beetles - A focus on forest ecology and fire behavior

  
Global Fire Initiative technical report, Vol. 2008, No. 2. (2008), pp. 1-13

Abstract

A synthesis of our current knowledge about the effects of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on lodgepole pine forests and fire behavior, with a geographic focus on Colorado and southern Wyoming. [Excerpt: Implications for future forests] Models for predicting future climates have progressed dramatically in recent years, but their accuracy is questionable for planning purposes, particularly at local levels. Nonetheless, model predictions suggest significant alterations in climate from past observed patterns. These predictions are supported by recent climate events that themselves had largely been predicted several years ago. Therefore, the potential ...

 

On the relationships between forest fires and weather conditions in Greece from long-term national observations (1894-2010)

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 22, No. 4. (2013), 493, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf12003

Abstract

Historical fire records and meteorological observations, spanning more than 1 century (1894–2010), were gathered and assembled in a database, to provide long-term fire–weather associations. We investigated the relationships between forest fire activity and meteorological parameters and sought to find temporal patterns and trends in these historical records and to identify any linkages between meteorological parameters and fire occurrence in the eastern Mediterranean region. Trend analysis of the time series revealed a statistically significant increase in the number of fires and air ...

 

Climate, CO2 and human population impacts on global wildfire emissions

  
Biogeosciences, Vol. 13, No. 1. (15 January 2016), pp. 267-282, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-267-2016

Abstract

Wildfires are by far the largest contributor to global biomass burning and constitute a large global source of atmospheric traces gases and aerosols. Such emissions have a considerable impact on air quality and constitute a major health hazard. Biomass burning also influences the radiative balance of the atmosphere and is thus not only of societal, but also of significant scientific interest. There is a common perception that climate change will lead to an increase in emissions as hot and dry weather ...

 

Ground-truthing the Drought Code: field verification of overwinter recharge of forest floor moisture

  
Vol. 268 (1996)

Abstract

[Excerpt:Executive summary] Users of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System are required to precede computation of the Drought Code (DC) component each spring by first calculating a mathematical model of overwinter recharge of moisture in the forest floor. Practical limitations of the mathematical model, required for operational simplicity, have resulted in requests from users for a field sampling procedure that can be used to verify the model, where, and when desired. [\n] This report describes a standard procedure for destructively sampling ...

 

Impact of anthropogenic climate change on wildfire across western US forests

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201607171, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1607171113

Abstract

[Significance] Increased forest fire activity across the western United States in recent decades has contributed to widespread forest mortality, carbon emissions, periods of degraded air quality, and substantial fire suppression expenditures. Although numerous factors aided the recent rise in fire activity, observed warming and drying have significantly increased fire-season fuel aridity, fostering a more favorable fire environment across forested systems. We demonstrate that human-caused climate change caused over half of the documented increases in fuel aridity since the 1970s and doubled the ...

 

Assessing live fuel moisture for fire management applications

  
In Fire in ecosystem management: shifting the paradigm from suppression to prescription, Vol. 20 (1998), pp. 49-55

Abstract

The variation associated with sampling live fuel moisture was examined for several shrub and canopy fuels in southern California, Arizona, and Colorado. Ninety-five % confidence intervals ranged from 5 to % . Estimated sample sizes varied greatly. The value of knowing the live fuel moisture content in fire decision making is unknown. If the fuel moisture is highly variable, then it is possible for the confidence intervals to span one or more fire behavior or danger classes. Errors in live fuel ...

 

Fire hazard and flammability of European forest types

  
In Post-Fire Management and Restoration of Southern European Forests, Vol. 24 (2012), pp. 79-92, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2208-8_4

Abstract

This chapter discusses the fire hazard and flammability of the forest types of Europe. It does not present an in-depth treatment of the subject of fire hazard and fuel flammability but after briefly listing and discussing the factors affecting flammability and its relation to fire hazard it focuses on the specifics of the European forest types and on expected changes under a global warming scenario, in an effort to provide support for post-fire management decisions. ...

 

Combining forest structure data and fuel modelling to classify fire hazard in Portugal

  
Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 66, No. 4. (2009), pp. 415-415, https://doi.org/10.1051/forest%2f2009013

Abstract

Fire management activities can greatly benefit from the description of wildland fuel to assess fire hazard. [\n] A forest typology developed from the Portuguese National Forest Inventory that combines cover type (the dominant overstorey species) and forest structure defined as a combination of generic stand density (closed or open) and height (low or tall) is translated into fuel models. Fire behaviour simulations that accounted for the fire environment modification induced by stand structure resulted in an objective and quantitative assessment of fire ...

 

Progress in wilderness fire science: embracing complexity

  
Journal of Forestry (May 2016), pp. 373-383, https://doi.org/10.5849/jof.15-008

Abstract

Wilderness has played an invaluable role in the development of wildland fire science. Since Agee's review of the subject 15 years ago, tremendous progress has been made in the development of models and data, in understanding the complexity of wildland fire as a landscape process, and in appreciating the social factors that influence the use of wilderness fire. Regardless of all we have learned, though, the reality is that fire remains an extraordinarily complex process with variable effects that create essential ...

 

The potential predictability of fire danger provided by numerical weather prediction

  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology (5 August 2016), https://doi.org/10.1175/jamc-d-15-0297.1

Abstract

A global fire danger rating system driven by atmospheric model forcing has been developed with the aim of providing early warning information to civil protection authorities. The daily predictions of fire danger conditions are based on the US Forest Service National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS), the Canadian forest service Fire Weather Index Rating System (FWI) and the Australian McArthur (MARK-5) rating systems. Weather forcings are provided in real time by the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) forecasting ...

 

Forest Service survey finds record 66 million dead trees in Southern Sierra Nevada

  
(June 2016)

Abstract

[Excerpt] The U.S. Forest Service today announced that it has identified an additional 26 million trees dead in California since October 2015. These trees are located in six counties across 760,000 acres in the southern Sierra Nevada region of the state, and are in addition to the 40 million trees that died statewide from 2010 to October 2015, bringing the total to at least 66 million dead trees. Four consecutive years of severe drought in California, a dramatic rise in bark ...

 

Forest-landscape structure mediates effects of a spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreak on subsequent likelihood of burning in Alaskan boreal forest

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 369 (June 2016), pp. 38-46, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2016.03.036

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We measured forest-landscape structure effects on disturbance patterns in Alaska. [::] Disturbance patterns and interactions were related to tree-species composition. [::] Bark beetles lead to increased probability of fire in mixed-spruce stands. [::] Results can inform management of disturbance in Alaska with climate change. [Abstract] Characterizing how variation in forest landscape structure shapes patterns of natural disturbances and mediates interactions between multiple disturbances is critical for anticipating ecological consequences of climate change in high-latitude forest ecosystems. During the 1990s, a massive spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus ...

 

Solar radiation and forest fuel moisture

  
Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. 67, No. 4. (1943), pp. 149-176

Abstract

A major contribution to progress in forest fire prevention and control during the past 10 years has been the development and widespread application of methods of rating forest fire danger. Fire danger rating systems are now in use in all the forest regions of the United States. They have been described by Gisborne, Brown and Davis, Curry et al., Matthews, Jemison, and others. Under each of these systems the major factors affecting fire danger are measured and the measurements are integrated ...

 

Possible land management uses of common cypress to reduce wildfire initiation risk: a laboratory study

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 159 (August 2015), pp. 68-77, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.05.020

Abstract

The flammability of Cupressus sempervirens has been fully characterized. Two contrasted bench-scale methodologies have been used to ratify the results. Cypress showed low ignitability and consumability and high sustainability and combustibility. The low ignitability of C. sempervirens suggests a potential resistance to moderate wildfires. Cypress stands could be a promising land management tool to reduce the wildfire initiation risk. Accurate determination of flammability is required in order to improve knowledge about vegetation fire risk. Study of the flammability of different plant species ...

 

How to predict the spread and intensity of forest and range fires

  
No. INT-143. (1983)

Abstract

This manual documents procedures for estimating the rate of forward spread, intensity, flame length, and size of fires burning in forests and rangelands. Contains instructions for obtaining fuel and weather data, calculating fire behavior, and interpreting the results for application to actual fire problems. ...

 

Simulating the spread of wildfires using a geographic information system and remote sensing

  
(1994)
Keywords: fire-fuel   forest-fires   grass-gis   rros   rspread   wildfires  
 

Climate impacts: Fire fuels change

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 4, No. 8. (August 2014), pp. 662-662, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2333

Abstract

[Excerpt] The burning of vegetation — biomass burning — impacts on climate and air pollution. The fires produce gases and particles that interact and change the atmosphere and clouds. Most biomass burning is human-caused, resulting from land-clearing and land-use change, with a small proportion due to natural causes. Mark Jacobson, of Stanford University, USA, uses a 3D global model to simulate biomass burning [...] Over a 20-year period, biomass burning caused a net temperature increase of 0.4 °C globally, largely because of ...

 

Mechanism behind mega-heatwaves pinpointed

  

Abstract

Two recent record hot spells traced to feedback loop between dry soils and trapped air. [Excerpt] The 'mega-heatwaves' that parched Europe in 2003 and Russia in 2010 were exacerbated by a vicious feedback loop between soil and atmosphere, researchers report today in Nature Geoscience1. Drying ground added more heat into air close to Earth's surface, a process that repeated over time to produce record-breaking warmth that shrivelled crops, set forests ablaze and claimed tens of thousands of lives. Without the extraordinarily dry ...

 

Highly reduced mass loss rates and increased litter layer in radioactively contaminated areas

  
Oecologia In Oecologia (2014), pp. 1-9, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-014-2908-8

Abstract

The effects of radioactive contamination from Chernobyl on decomposition of plant material still remain unknown. We predicted that decomposition rate would be reduced in the most contaminated sites due to an absence or reduced densities of soil invertebrates. If microorganisms were the main agents responsible for decomposition, exclusion of large soil invertebrates should not affect decomposition. In September 2007 we deposited 572 bags with uncontaminated dry leaf litter from four species of trees in the leaf litter layer at 20 forest ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 13

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: extrapolation-error   extreme-events   extreme-weather   f-script   fabaceae   factor-analysis   fagus-crenata   fagus-engleriana   fagus-grandifolia   fagus-hayatae   fagus-japonica   fagus-longipetiolata   fagus-lucida   fagus-mexicana   fagus-moesiaca   fagus-multinervis   fagus-orientalis   fagus-silvatica   fagus-spp   fagus-sylvatica   fagus-taurica   faidherbia-albida   fallopia-spp   false-observations-propagation   false-positive   family-heritability   fao-ecozones   faostat   fapar   feather-moss   featured-publication   feedback   feedforward-networks   fennoscandia   fertile-islands   fertilization   ficus-altissima   ficus-aurea   ficus-benghalensis   ficus-carica   ficus-citrifolia   ficus-elastica   ficus-macrophylla   ficus-religiosa   field-measurements   filbert   financial-modelling   fine-roots   finland   fir-decline   fire   fire-ecology   fire-emissions   fire-fuel   fire-regimes   fire-season   fire-severity   fise   fish-resources   fitness   fitzroya-cupressoides   flagship-species   flammability   flash-flood   fleshy-fruit   flood-control   flood-frequency   flood-tolerance   flooding-tolerance   floodplain   floodplain-forest   floods   flora   floss   flow-accumulation   flowering-period   flowering-phenology   fluvial   fodder-tree   foliage   food-plant   food-security   food-web   forecast   forest-bioeconomy   forest-biomass   forest-classification   forest-communities   forest-conservation   forest-conversion   forest-damage   forest-degradation   forest-disturbance   forest-dynamics   forest-ecology   forest-ecosystem   forest-ecosystems   forest-edges   inrmm-list-of-tags   postfire-recovery  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

How risk management can prevent future wildfire disasters in the wildland-urban interface

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 2. (14 January 2014), pp. 746-751, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1315088111

Abstract

[Significance] Recent wildfire events throughout the world have highlighted the consequences of residential development in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) including hundreds to thousands of homes burned during a single wildfire to, more tragically, firefighter and homeowner fatalities. Despite substantial investments in modifying wildland fuels near populated areas, losses appear to be increasing. In this article, we examine the conditions under which WUI wildfire disasters occur and introduce a wildfire risk assessment framework. By using this framework, we examine how prefire mitigation ...

 

Managing forests and fire in changing climates

  
Science, Vol. 342, No. 6154. (04 October 2013), pp. 41-42, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1240294

Abstract

With projected climate change, we expect to face much more forest fire in the coming decades. Policy-makers are challenged not to categorize all fires as destructive to ecosystems simply because they have long flame lengths and kill most of the trees within the fire boundary. Ecological context matters: In some ecosystems, high-severity regimes are appropriate, but climate change may modify these fire regimes and ecosystems as well. Some undesirable impacts may be avoided or reduced through global strategies, as well as ...

 

Fire modeling and information system technology

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 10, No. 4. (2001), pp. 343-352, https://doi.org/10.1071/WF01033

Abstract

Fire modeling and information system technology play an important supporting role in fuel and fire management. Modeling is used to examine alternative fuel treatment options, project potential ecosystem changes, and assess risk to life and property. Models are also used to develop fire prescriptions, conduct prescribed fire operations, and predict fire behavior. Fire models and information systems have greatly influenced fuel assessment methods. As an example, we examine the evolution of technology used to put Rothermel’s fire spread model into application. ...

 

Dynamic data driven ensemble for wildfire behaviour assessment: a case study

  
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 413 (2013), pp. 11-22, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41151-9_2

Abstract

Wildfire information has long been collected in Europe, with particular focus on forest fires. The European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS) of the European Commission complements and harmonises the information collected by member countries and covers the forest fire management cycle. This latter ranges from forest fire preparedness to post-fire impact analysis. However, predicting and simulating fire event dynamics requires the integrated modelling of several sources of uncertainty. Here we present a case study of a novel conceptualization based on a Semantic ...

 

An architecture for adaptive robust modelling of wildfire behaviour under deep uncertainty

  
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 413 (2013), pp. 367-380, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41151-9_35

Abstract

Wildfires in Europe - especially in the Mediterranean region - are one of the major treats at landscape scale. While their immediate impact ranges from endangering human life to the destruction of economic assets, other damages exceed the spatio-temporal scale of a fire event. Wildfires involving forest resources are associated with intense carbon emissions and alteration of surrounding ecosystems. The induced land cover degradation has also a potential role in exacerbating soil erosion and shallow landslides. A component of the complexity in assessing ...

Visual summary

 

A Review of Fine Fuel Moisture Modelling

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 1, No. 4. (1991), pp. 215-234, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf9910215

Abstract

Models describing the moisture content of forest fuels are an integral component of most fire behaviour prediction systems. In this paper, models of all aspects of moisture change in fine, dead, surface litter are examined and reviewed. Included are models describing the changes in moisture content associated with isother mal vapour exchange by sorption processes, and the effects of precipitation and condensation of liquid water. Models for predicting fuel temperature and humidity, and equilibrium moisture content are also assessed. Critical reviews ...

 

A data-driven model for large wildfire behaviour prediction in Europe

  
Procedia Computer Science, Vol. 18 (2013), pp. 1861-1870, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.procs.2013.05.355

Abstract

The European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS) has been established by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Directorate General for Environment (DG ENV) of the European Commission (EC) in close collaboration with the Member States and neighbour countries. EFFIS is intended as complementary system to national and regional systems in the countries, providing harmonised information required for international collaboration on forest fire prevention and fighting and in cases of trans-boundary fire events. However, one missing component in the system is ...

 

Assessment of forest fire impacts and emissions in the European Union based on the European Forest Fire Information System

  
In Wildland Fires and Air Pollution, Vol. 8 (2008), pp. 197-208, https://doi.org/10.1016/s1474-8177(08)00008-9

Abstract

An analysis on the number of forest fires and burned area distribution as retrieved by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS) database is presented. On average, from 2000 to 2005 about 95,000 fires occurred annually in 23 European countries, burning almost 600,000 ha of forest land every year. Of these about two-thirds or 65,000 fires occurred in 5 European Union (EU) Mediterranean countries (France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain) where on average half a million hectares of forest land were burned ...

 

Aids to determining fuel models for estimating fire behavior

  
Vol. (Gen. Tech. Rep.) INT-122 (1982)

Abstract

This report presents photographic examples, tabulations, and a similarity chart to assist fire behavior officers, fuel management specialists, and other field personnel in selecting a fuel model appropriate for a specific field situation. Proper selection of a fuel model is a critical step in the mathematical modeling of fire behavior and fire danger rating. This guide will facilitate the selection of the proper fire behavior fuel model and will allow comparison with fire danger rating fuel models. The 13 fire behavior fuel ...

 

The concept of fire environment

  
Fire Management today, Vol. 64, No. 1. (2004), pp. 49-52

Abstract

Fire environment is the complex of fuel, topographic, and airmass factors that influences or modifies the inception, growth, and behavior of fire. ...

 

Parametric study of an eruptive fire behaviour model

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 15, No. 2. (2006), 169, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf05050

Abstract

The application of a mathematical model to predict dynamic fire behaviour with different types of fuels is explored. This model predicts the occurrence of eruptive fire behaviour that is observed mainly in steep slopes and canyons. The practical range of the parameters involved in the model is estimated and their average values for four main fuel types are presented. The predicted differences in dynamic fire behaviour between light and heavy fuels are justified by observations. Given the importance of time as ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/fire-fuel

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.