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Selection: with tag environment-society-economy [47 articles] 

 

At the nexus of fire, water and society

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (23 May 2016), 20150172, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0172

Abstract

The societal risks of water scarcity and water-quality impairment have received considerable attention, evidenced by recent analyses of these topics by the 2030 Water Resources Group, the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. What are the effects of fire on the predicted water scarcity and declines in water quality? Drinking water supplies for humans, the emphasis of this exploration, are derived from several land cover types, including forests, grasslands and peatlands, which are vulnerable to fire. In the last two ...

 

What causes large fires in Southern France

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 294 (April 2013), pp. 76-85, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2012.06.055

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] 0.8% Of fires were larger than 100 ha but accounted for 71% of total burned area. [::] On the whole area, the main cause was arson. [::] Occurrence mainly linked to shrubland population, minor road, fall-spring drought. [::] Burned area linked to shrubland fall–winter rain, summer drought, unemployment. [::] The areas the most affected were located to the East on the Mediterranean coast. [Abstract] In Southern France, where most wildfires occur, the fire size has never exceeded 6744 ha since 1991, whereas ...

 

Transboundary health impacts of transported global air pollution and international trade

  
Nature, Vol. 543, No. 7647. (29 March 2017), pp. 705-709, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature21712

Abstract

Millions of people die every year from diseases caused by exposure to outdoor air pollution. Some studies have estimated premature mortality related to local sources of air pollution, but local air quality can also be affected by atmospheric transport of pollution from distant sources. International trade is contributing to the globalization of emission and pollution as a result of the production of goods (and their associated emissions) in one region for consumption in another region. The effects of international trade on ...

 

Libros

  
Revista Montes, Vol. 125 (2016), pp. 76-77

Abstract

[Excerpt] [:Libro blanco del sector de aviones contra incendios forestales] [::Autores] Carles Algué y Aitor Martín [\n] [...] España cuenta con uno de los mejores sistemas de extinción de incendios forestales del mundo, en el que los medios aéreos constituyen un pilar clave. Los aviones anti-incendios operados por empresas privadas cada verano en España representan más de un tercio de la capacidad total de lanzamiento de agua disponible, aunque sólo la décima parte del presupuesto total anual destinado a medios aéreos. [...] [:Flora literaria del ...

 

The development of environmental thinking in economics

  
Environmental Values, Vol. 8, No. 4. (November 1999), pp. 413-435, https://doi.org/10.3197/096327199129341897

Abstract

There has always been a sub-group of established economists trying to convey an environmental critique of the mainstream. This paper traces their thinking into the late 20th century via the development of associations and journals in the USA and Europe. There is clearly a divergence between the conformity to neo-classical economics favoured by resource and environmental economists and the acceptance of more radical critiques apparent in ecological economics. Thus, the progressive elements of ecological economics are increasingly incompatible with those practising ...

 

The economic possibilities of conservation

  
The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 27, No. 3. (01 May 1913), pp. 497-519, https://doi.org/10.2307/1883375

Abstract

[Excerpt] It is desirable to confine the idea of conservation to its original application to natural resources. Even in this sense the concept as developed in the conservation movement comprises several distinct purposes, which are not clearly separated in the popular mind. In the first place, it expresses a demand for a fair distribution of the natural resources not yet alienated. [\n] [...] The real heart of the conservation problem presents an issue which taxes the resources of economic theory to the utmost. ...

 

The trouble with negative emissions

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6309. (14 October 2016), pp. 182-183, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah4567

Abstract

In December 2015, member states of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, which aims to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2°C and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. The Paris Agreement requires that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission sources and sinks are balanced by the second half of this century. Because some nonzero sources are unavoidable, this leads to the abstract concept of “negative emissions,” the ...

 

Resources

  
In The development dictionary: a guide to knowledge as power (2010), pp. 228-242
edited by Wolfgang Sachs

Abstract

[Excerpt] ‘Resource’ originally implied life. Its root is the Latin verb surgere, which evoked the image of a spring that continually rises from the ground. Like a spring, a ‘re-source’ rises again and again, even if it has repeatedly been used and consumed. The concept thus highlighted nature’s power of self-regeneration and called attention to her prodigious creativity. Moreover, it implied an ancient idea about the relationship between humans and nature: that the earth bestows gifts on humans who, in turn, are well advised to show diligence in ...

 

Recent advances and remaining uncertainties in resolving past and future climate effects on global fire activity

  
Current Climate Change Reports, Vol. 2, No. 1. (2016), pp. 1-14, https://doi.org/10.1007/s40641-016-0031-0

Abstract

Fire is an integral component of the Earth system that will critically affect how terrestrial carbon budgets and living systems respond to climate change. Paleo and observational records document robust positive relationships between fire activity and aridity in many parts of the world on interannual to millennial timescales. Observed increases in fire activity and aridity in many areas over the past several decades motivate curiosity as to the degree to which anthropogenic climate change will alter global fire regimes and subsequently ...

 

Progress in wilderness fire science: embracing complexity

  
Journal of Forestry (May 2016), pp. 373-383, https://doi.org/10.5849/jof.15-008

Abstract

Wilderness has played an invaluable role in the development of wildland fire science. Since Agee's review of the subject 15 years ago, tremendous progress has been made in the development of models and data, in understanding the complexity of wildland fire as a landscape process, and in appreciating the social factors that influence the use of wilderness fire. Regardless of all we have learned, though, the reality is that fire remains an extraordinarily complex process with variable effects that create essential ...

 

The bio-economy concept and knowledge base in a public goods and farmer perspective

  
Bio-based and Applied Economics, Vol. 1, No. 1. (2012), pp. 47-63

Abstract

Currently an industrial perspective dominates the EU policy framework for a European bio-economy. The Commission’s proposal on the bio-economy emphasises greater resource-efficiency, largely within an industrial perspective on global economic competitiveness, benefiting capital-intensive industries at higher levels of the value chain. However a responsible bio-economy must initially address the sustainable use of resources. Many farmers are not only commodity producers but also providers of quality food and managers of the eco-system. A public goods-oriented bio-economy emphasises agro-ecological methods, organic and low ...

 

The charcoal vision: a win–win–win scenario for simultaneously producing bioenergy, permanently sequestering carbon, while improving soil and water quality

  
Agronomy Journal, Vol. 100, No. 1. (2008), 178, https://doi.org/10.2134/agrojnl2007.0161

Abstract

Processing biomass through a distributed network of fast pyrolyzers may be a sustainable platform for producing energy from biomass. Fast pyrolyzers thermally transform biomass into bio-oil, syngas, and charcoal. The syngas could provide the energy needs of the pyrolyzer. Bio-oil is an energy raw material (∼17 MJ kg−1) that can be burned to generate heat or shipped to a refinery for processing into transportation fuels. Charcoal could also be used to generate energy; however, application of the charcoal co-product to soils ...

 

How chimpanzees cooperate in a competitive world

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 36. (06 September 2016), pp. 10215-10220, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611826113

Abstract

[Significance] Competitive tendencies may make it hard for members of a group to cooperate with each other. Humans use many different “enforcement” strategies to keep competition in check and favor cooperation. To test whether one of our closest relatives uses similar strategies, we gave a group of chimpanzees a cooperative problem that required joint action by two or three individuals. The open-group set-up allowed the chimpanzees a choice between cooperation and competitive behavior like freeloading. The chimpanzees used a combination of partner ...

 

Coordinate efforts on EU invasive species

  
Science, Vol. 353, No. 6303. (01 September 2016), pp. 998-998, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah6700

Abstract

[Excerpt] An ambitious move by the European Union to eradicate, or at least contain, 37 invasive alien species across the region may fail if Member States do not coordinate their efforts. Despite calls for the establishment of a coordinating authority and the recognition of the cost-effectiveness of such a body, the European Parliament had little appetite to fund another centralized regulatory body. It thus elected to establish only a legal framework without a dedicated body or resources to oversee its ...

 

Armed-conflict risks enhanced by climate-related disasters in ethnically fractionalized countries

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 33. (16 August 2016), pp. 9216-9221, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1601611113

Abstract

[Significance] Ethnic divides play a major role in many armed conflicts around the world and might serve as predetermined conflict lines following rapidly emerging societal tensions arising from disruptive events like natural disasters. We find evidence in global datasets that risk of armed-conflict outbreak is enhanced by climate-related disaster occurrence in ethnically fractionalized countries. Although we find no indications that environmental disasters directly trigger armed conflicts, our results imply that disasters might act as a threat multiplier in several of the world’s ...

 

From local scenarios to national maps: a participatory framework for envisioning the future of Tanzania

  
Ecology and Society, Vol. 21, No. 3. (2016), https://doi.org/10.5751/es-08565-210304

Abstract

Tackling societal and environmental challenges requires new approaches that connect top-down global oversight with bottom-up subnational knowledge. We present a novel framework for participatory development of spatially explicit scenarios at national scale that model socioeconomic and environmental dynamics by reconciling local stakeholder perspectives and national spatial data. We illustrate results generated by this approach and evaluate its potential to contribute to a greater understanding of the relationship between development pathways and sustainability. Using the lens of land use and land cover ...

 

The SmartH2O project and the role of social computing in promoting efficient residential water use: a first analysis

  
In Proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software, June 15-19, San Diego, California, USA (2014)

Abstract

SmartH2O is an EU funded project which aims at creating a virtuous feedback cycle between water users and the utilities, providing users information on their consumption in quasi real time, and thus enabling water utilities to plan and implement strategies to reduce/reallocate water consumption. Traditional metering data, usually gathered twice a year, can be used to model consumers’ behaviour at an aggregate level, but the motivations and individual attitudes of consumers are hidden. The advent of smart water meters allows gathering high frequency consumption data that ...

 

Beneficial biofuels - The food, energy, and environment trilemma

  
Science, Vol. 325, No. 5938. (2009), pp. 270-271, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1177970

Abstract

[Summary] Recent analyses of the energy and greenhouse-gas performance of alternative biofuels have ignited a controversy that may be best resolved by applying two simple principles. In a world seeking solutions to its energy, environmental, and food challenges, society cannot afford to miss out on the global greenhouse-gas emission reductions and the local environmental and societal benefits when biofuels are done right. However, society also cannot accept the undesirable impacts of biofuels done wrong. ...

 

The circular economy

  
Nature, Vol. 531, No. 7595. (23 March 2016), pp. 435-438, https://doi.org/10.1038/531435a

Abstract

A new relationship with our goods and materials would save resources and energy and create local jobs, explains Walter R. Stahel. [Excerpt: Systems thinking] There are three kinds of industrial economy: linear, circular and performance. [\n] A linear economy flows like a river, turning natural resources into base materials and products for sale through a series of value-adding steps. At the point of sale, ownership and liability for risks and waste pass to the buyer (who is now owner and user). The owner decides ...

 

Integrating local and scientific knowledge for environmental management

  
Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 91, No. 8. (22 August 2010), pp. 1766-1777, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2010.03.023

Abstract

This paper evaluates the processes and mechanisms available for integrating different types of knowledge for environmental management. Following a review of the challenges associated with knowledge integration, we present a series of questions for identifying, engaging, evaluating and applying different knowledges during project design and delivery. These questions are used as a basis to compare three environmental management projects that aimed to integrate knowledge from different sources in the United Kingdom, Solomon Islands and Australia. Comparative results indicate that integrating different ...

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Bio-based economy in Europe: state of play and future potential - Part 2 Summary of position papers received in response to the European Commission's public on-line consultation

  

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] This report summarises the 35 position papers received from organisations directly or indirectly linked to the bio-based economy in response to the public consultation on the ‘bio-based economy for Europe: state of play and future potential’. [Definition of a bio-based economy] The respondents support a public goods-oriented global and coherent strategy for a sustainable bio-based economy focusing on a recycling community, conservation of ecosystems and equitable sharing. An alternative definition of the bio-economy could be: [\n]A public goods-oriented bio-based economy based on: [::] […] production paradigms that rely ...

 

Il valore economico del cipresso: paesaggio e ambiente

  
In Contributo del Cipresso alla valorizzazione Economica ed Ambientale del Territorio (2004), pp. 88-90

Abstract

[Excerpt] Il cipresso ha un notevole valore ed importanza paesaggistico-ambientale. [\n] I più appariscenti impieghi del cipresso sono quelli legati al suo uso come pianta forestale produttiva e come frangivento. [\n] In zone a clima caldo-arido e battute da brezze (zone litoranee), il cipresso, nella sua varietà horizontalis, considerata la buona resistenza alla forza impattante del vento, può essere impiegato nella costituzione di barriere e cortine frangivento a protezione di retrostanti colture agrarie. Oltretutto il cipresso grazie alla facoltà di rigenerare la chioma in modo efficace e ...

 

Recovery of large carnivores in Europe's modern human-dominated landscapes

  
Science, Vol. 346, No. 6216. (18 December 2014), pp. 1517-1519, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1257553

Abstract

[Editor's summary: Success for Europe's large carnivores?] Despite pessimistic forecasts, Europe's large carnivores are making a comeback. Chapron et al. report that sustainable populations of brown bear, Eurasian lynx, gray wolf, and wolverine persist in one-third of mainland Europe. Moreover, many individuals and populations are surviving and increasing outside protected areas set aside for wildlife conservation. Coexistence alongside humans has become possible, argue the authors, because of improved public opinion and protective legislation. [Abstract] The conservation of large carnivores is a formidable ...

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Reversals of national fortune, and social science methodologies

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 50. (16 December 2014), pp. 17709-17714, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1415280111

Abstract

Among non-European regions colonized by Europeans, regions that were relatively richer five centuries ago (like Mexico, Peru, and India) tend to be poorer today, while regions that originally were relatively poorer (like the United States, Chile, and Australia) tend now to be richer. Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (abbreviated AJR) established the generality of this reversal of fortune. Chanda, Cook, and Putterman (abbreviated CCP) have now reanalyzed it, taking as a unit of analysis populations rather than geographic regions. That is, India's ...

 

Dealing with femtorisks in international relations

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 49. (09 December 2014), pp. 17356-17362, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1400229111

Abstract

The contemporary global community is increasingly interdependent and confronted with systemic risks posed by the actions and interactions of actors existing beneath the level of formal institutions, often operating outside effective governance structures. Frequently, these actors are human agents, such as rogue traders or aggressive financial innovators, terrorists, groups of dissidents, or unauthorized sources of sensitive or secret information about government or private sector activities. In other instances, influential “actors” take the form of climate change, communications technologies, or socioeconomic globalization. ...

 

Monetary valuation of ecosystem services: it matters to get the timeline right

  
Ecological Economics, Vol. 95 (November 2013), pp. 231-235, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2013.09.009

Abstract

In the abundant literature dealing with the monetary valuation, or monetization, of ecosystem services (MES), with very few exceptions, the concept is presented as having emerged in 1997. In fact, there is a long history, starting in the late fifties but largely ignored, of sustained attempts to assign monetary values to nature's services. These early efforts encountered many conceptual and methodological roadblocks, which could not be resolved and led a number of researchers to argue that monetary valuation was not a ...

 

Using and improving the social cost of carbon

  
Science, Vol. 346, No. 6214. (05 December 2014), pp. 1189-1190, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1259774

Abstract

The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a crucial tool for economic analysis of climate policies. The SCC estimates the dollar value of reduced climate change damages associated with a one-metric-ton reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although the conceptual basis, challenges, and merits of the SCC are well established, its use in government cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is relatively new. In light of challenges in constructing the SCC, its newness in government regulation, and the importance of updating, we propose an ...

 

Sustainable biofuels redux

  
Science, Vol. 322, No. 5898. (03 October 2008), pp. 49-50, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1161525

Abstract

[Excerpt] Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices—as will a 2007 legislative mandate for ...

 

Importing Timber, Exporting Ecological Impact

  
Science, Vol. 308, No. 5720. (15 April 2005), pp. 359-360, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1109476

Abstract

Covering 32% of the planet, boreal forests are one of the last relatively intact terrestrial biomes, and are a critical carbon sink in global climate dynamics. Mature and old-growth boreal forests provide a large number of products that are culturally and economically important, from wood-based lumber, pulp, and fuel wood, to numerous nonwood products. Intensive wood harvest and conservation of naturally dynamic intact forests tend to be mutually exclusive; where biodiversity is highly valued, wood harvests are limited or banned outright. ...

 

Modelling and simulating change in reforesting mountain landscapes using a social-ecological framework

  
Landscape Ecology In Landscape Ecology, Vol. 25, No. 2. (1 February 2010), pp. 267-285, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-009-9438-5

Abstract

Natural reforestation of European mountain landscapes raises major environmental and societal issues. With local stakeholders in the Pyrenees National Park area (France), we studied agricultural landscape colonisation by ash (Fraxinus excelsior) to enlighten its impacts on biodiversity and other landscape functions of importance for the valley socio-economics. The study comprised an integrated assessment of land-use and land-cover change (LUCC) since the 1950s, and a scenario analysis of alternative future policy. We combined knowledge and methods from landscape ecology, land change and ...

 

Changes and interactions between forest landscape connectivity and burnt area in Spain

  
Ecological Indicators, Vol. 33 (October 2013), pp. 129-138, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2013.01.018

Abstract

The spatial structure, functionality and dynamics of forest landscapes in peninsular Spain and the Balearic Islands were compared over the last five decades. Two particular features were studied in the sample sites: forest connectivity for wildlife and areas burnt by wildfires. 191 Squares, each 4 km × 4 km, were selected from the SISPARES (the monitoring framework designed to evaluate the trends in the structure of Spanish rural landscapes) environmental strata. Aerial photographs from 1956, 1984, 1998 and 2008 were interpreted ...

 

Computer support for environmental impact assessment: proceedings of the IFIP TC5/WG5.11 Working Conference on Computer Support for Environmental Impact Assessment, CSEIA 93, Como, Italy, 6-8 October, 1993

  
(1994)

Abstract

Any choice with a significant impact on the environment should, in principle, be the outcome of a political process reflecting the social preferences of everyone involved. Unfortunately, this ideal procedure requires a level of time and money that does not justify its application for planning each specific intervention. Different methods, mainly derived from traditional investment analyses, have been proposed for providing a rational basis for environmental decisions that cannot be analysed through a public debate. These methods have proved inadequate, however, ...

 

Earth systems: Model human adaptation to climate change

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7515. (27 August 2014), pp. 365-366, https://doi.org/10.1038/512365a

Abstract

[Excerpt] We can no longer ignore feedbacks between global warming and how people respond, say Paul I. Palmer and Matthew J. Smith. Current models of Earth's climate capture physical and biophysical processes. But the planet has entered a new state: humans are adapting to, as well as causing, environmental changes. This major feedback must be modelled. Projections of the future climate based on simple economic narratives1 — from cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions to unmitigated growth — are unrealistic. Faced with droughts ...

 

People power

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7515. (27 August 2014), pp. 347-347, https://doi.org/10.1038/512347b

Abstract

[Excerpt] Climate models must consider how humans are responding to a warming world. Physics and mathematics can tell us how the Universe began, but as the cosmologist Stephen Hawking noted: “They are not much use in predicting human behaviour because there are far too many equations to solve.” The motives, needs and desires that drive human action have long resisted rational analysis. From the volatility of the stock market to fads and fashions that flare brightly and then vanish, the ability ...

 

Integrated assessment models for ecologists: the present and the future

  
Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol. 23, No. 2. (February 2014), pp. 124-143, https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12100

Abstract

[Aim] Human impacts on the biosphere are a matter of urgent and growing concern, with ecologists increasingly being asked to project biodiversity futures. The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is likely to comprehensively assess such projections, yet despite being widely used and potentially critical tools for analysing socio-environmental futures, integrated assessment models (IAMs) have received little attention from ecological modellers. We aim to raise awareness and understanding of IAMs among ecologists by describing the structure and composition of ...

 

A framework for vulnerability analysis in sustainability science

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 100, No. 14. (08 July 2003), pp. 8074-8079, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1231335100

Abstract

Global environmental change and sustainability science increasingly recognize the need to address the consequences of changes taking place in the structure and function of the biosphere. These changes raise questions such as: Who and what are vulnerable to the multiple environmental changes underway, and where? Research demonstrates that vulnerability is registered not by exposure to hazards (perturbations and stresses) alone but also resides in the sensitivity and resilience of the system experiencing such hazards. This recognition requires revisions and enlargements in ...

 

Beyond the ABC: climate change policy and theories of social change

  
Environment and Planning A, Vol. 42, No. 6. (2010), pp. 1273-1285, https://doi.org/10.1068/a42282

Abstract

In this short and deliberately provocative paper I reflect on what seems to be a yawning gulf between the potential contribution of the social sciences and the typically restricted models and concepts of social change embedded in contemporary environmental policy in the UK, and in other countries too. As well as making a strong case for going beyond what I refer to as the dominant paradigm of 'ABC' - attitude, behaviour, and choice - I discuss the attractions of this model, ...

 

Integrating tipping points into climate impact assessments

  
Climatic Change In Climatic Change, Vol. 117, No. 3. (29 August 2013), pp. 585-597, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-012-0572-8

Abstract

There is currently a huge gulf between natural scientists’ understanding of climate tipping points and economists’ representations of climate catastrophes in integrated assessment models (IAMs). In particular, there are multiple potential tipping points and they are not all low-probability events; at least one has a significant probability of being passed this century under mid-range (2–4 °C) global warming, and they cannot all be ruled out at low (<2 °C) warming. In contrast, the dominant framing of climate catastrophes in IAMs, and in critiques ...

 

Managing complex adaptive systems - A co-evolutionary perspective on natural resource management

  
Ecological Economics, Vol. 63, No. 1. (15 June 2007), pp. 9-21, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.12.014

Abstract

The overexploitation of natural resources and the increasing number of social conflicts following from their unsustainable use point to a wide gap between the objectives of sustainability and current resource management practices. One of the reasons for the difficulties to close this gap is that for evolving complex systems like natural and socio-economic systems, sustainability cannot be a static objective. Instead sustainable development is an open evolutionary process of improving the management of social-ecological systems, through better understanding and knowledge. Therefore, ...

 

Framework for participative reflection on the accomplishment of transdisciplinary research programs

  
Environmental Science & Policy, Vol. 13, No. 8. (22 December 2010), pp. 733-741, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2010.08.002

Abstract

In response to the increasingly complex social–ecological issues facing society, there is a growing trend to conduct environmental research in large collaborative programs. This approach is described as transdisciplinary research as it transcends formal disciplinary boundaries, explicitly acknowledges that many different perspectives are relevant to the resolution of complex problems, and actively involves the users of research. This poses challenges for the evaluation of “impact” as any evaluation process must take into consideration the different expectations, values, culture, language and reward ...

 

What the numbers tell us

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6186. (23 May 2014), pp. 818-821, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6186.818

Abstract

[Excerpt] In 2011, the wrath of the 99% kindled Occupy movements around the world. The protests petered out, but in their wake an international conversation about inequality has arisen, with tens of thousands of speeches, articles, and blogs engaging everyone from President Barack Obama on down. Ideology and emotion drive much of the debate. But increasingly, the discussion is sustained by a tide of new data on the gulf between rich and poor. This special issue uses these fresh waves of data ...

 

Perceptions of water use

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 14. (08 April 2014), pp. 5129-5134, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1316402111

Abstract

[Significance] Public perceptions of water use are explored using an online survey (N = 1,020). Results show that participants underestimated water use by a factor of 2 on average, with large underestimates for high water-use activities. High numeracy scores, older age, and male sex were associated with more accurate perceptions of water use. Overall, perception of water use is more accurate than the perception of energy consumption and savings previously reported, however perceptions of both resources show significant underestimation. [Abstract] In a ...

 

Quantifying causal mechanisms to determine how protected areas affect poverty through changes in ecosystem services and infrastructure

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 11. (18 March 2014), pp. 4332-4337, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1307712111

Abstract

[Significance] Scholars are accumulating evidence about the effects of environmental programs on social outcomes. Quantifying these effects is important, but to design better programs we need to understand how these effects arise. Little is known about the mechanisms through which ecosystem conservation programs affect human welfare. Our study demonstrates that, with existing data and appropriate empirical designs, scientists and policymakers can elucidate these previously unidentified mechanisms. We estimate how Costa Rica’s protected area system reduced poverty in neighboring communities. Nearly two-thirds ...

 

Culturing the Forest

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6175. (07 March 2014), pp. 1078-1079, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1250655

Abstract

Examining the widespread resurgence of woodlands, the authors build a multifaceted view of forests as social-ecological systems. ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 12

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: endangered-species   endemic-species   endophtic-fungi   energy   energy-consumption   engineering   england   english   enological-parameters   ensemble   enso   enterolobium-cyclocarpum   entransy   entropy   environment-society-economy   environmental-factors   environmental-modelling   environmental-policy   environmental-predictors   envisat-asar   enzykl-holzgew-handb-atlas-dendrol   ephedra-distachya   epinotia-solandriana   epirrita-autumnata   epistemology   eppo   equador   equity   erica-arborea   erica-australis   erica-spp   erica-tetralix   erica-vagans   erodibility   erosion   erosivity   error-clustering   error-spatial-correlation   errors   erwinia-salicis   eryobotria-japonica   erythrina-abyssinica   erythrina-poeppigiana   erythrina-sandwicensis   erythrina-variegata   escarpment   esdac   essential-oils   estonia   ethics   eu-27   eucaliptus-camaldulensis   eucalyptus-citriodora   eucalyptus-coccifera   eucalyptus-diversicolor   eucalyptus-globulus   eucalyptus-gunii   eucalyptus-nitens   eucalyptus-regnans   eucalyptus-spp   euclystis-spp   eucryphia-cordifolia   eugenia-malaccensis   euonymus-europaea   euonymus-europaeus   euonymus-latifolia   euonymus-spp   euonymus-verrucosa   euproctis-chrysorrhoea   europe   europe-2020   european-black-poplar   european-commission   european-conifer   european-council   european-parliament   european-research-council   european-soil-data-centre   european-union   euterpe-oleracea   eutrophication   evaporation   evapotranspiration   even-aged-forest   evergreen   evolution   evolutionary-techniques   evolutionary-tools   evonymus-europaea   ex-situ-conservation   exotic-plants   expat   experimental-approach   experimental-mathematics   expert-judgement   expert-systems   extinction   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Taking a bite out of biodiversity

  
Science, Vol. 343, No. 6173. (21 February 2014), pp. 838-838, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.343.6173.838-a

Abstract

[excerpt] In the Review “Status and ecological effects of the world's largest carnivores” (10 January, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1241484), W. J. Ripple et al. claim that meat consumption by humans is one of many threats to carnivores and biodiversity. We argue that human carnivory is in fact the single greatest threat to overall biodiversity. Livestock production accounts for up to 75% of all agricultural lands and 30% of Earth's land surface, making it the single largest anthropogenic land use. Meat and feedstock production ...

 

Assessing Viability and Sustainability: a Systems-based Approach for Deriving Comprehensive Indicator Sets

  
Ecology and Society, Vol. 5, No. 2. (2001), 12+

Abstract

Performance assessment in holistic approaches such as integrated natural resource management has to deal with a complex set of interacting and self-organizing natural and human systems and agents, all pursuing their own "interests" while also contributing to the development of the total system. Performance indicators must therefore reflect the viability of essential component systems as well as their contributions to the viability and performance of other component systems and the total system under study. A systems-based derivation of a comprehensive set ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/environment-society-economy

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.