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Selection: with tag education [40 articles] 

 

Reboot for the AI revolution

  
Nature, Vol. 550, No. 7676. (17 October 2017), pp. 324-327, https://doi.org/10.1038/550324a

Abstract

As artificial intelligence puts many out of work, we must forge new economic, social and educational systems, argues Yuval Noah Harari. [Excerpt] The ongoing artificial-intelligence revolution will change almost every line of work, creating enormous social and economic opportunities — and challenges. Some believe that intelligent computers will push humans out of the job market and create a new 'useless class'; others maintain that automation will generate a wide range of new human jobs and greater prosperity for all. Almost everybody agrees ...

 

Specific reduction in cortisol stress reactivity after social but not attention-based mental training

  
Science Advances, Vol. 3, No. 10. (04 October 2017), e1700495, https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1700495

Abstract

Psychosocial stress is a public health burden in modern societies. Chronic stress–induced disease processes are, in large part, mediated via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. We asked whether the contemplative mental training of different practice types targeting attentional, socio-affective (for example, compassion), or socio-cognitive abilities (for example, perspective-taking) in the context of a 9-month longitudinal training study offers an effective means for psychosocial stress reduction. Using a multimethod approach including subjective, endocrine, autonomic, and immune ...

 

Structural plasticity of the social brain: differential change after socio-affective and cognitive mental training

  
Science Advances, Vol. 3, No. 10. (04 October 2017), e1700489, https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1700489

Abstract

Although neuroscientific research has revealed experience-dependent brain changes across the life span in sensory, motor, and cognitive domains, plasticity relating to social capacities remains largely unknown. To investigate whether the targeted mental training of different cognitive and social skills can induce specific changes in brain morphology, we collected longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data throughout a 9-month mental training intervention from a large sample of adults between 20 and 55 years of age. By means of various daily mental exercises and ...

 

Mapping indicators of female welfare at high spatial resolution

  
(2017)

Abstract

Improved understanding of geographic variation and inequity in health status, wealth, and access to resources within countries is increasingly being recognized as central to meeting development goals. Development and health indicators assessed at national scales conceal important inequities, with the rural poor often least well represented. High-resolution data on key social and health indicators are fundamental for targeting limited resources, especially where development funding has recently come under increased pressure. Globally, around 80% of countries regularly produce sex-disaggregated statistics at a ...

References

  1. Alegana, V.A., Atkinson, P.M., Pezzulo, C., Sorichetta, A., Weiss, D., Bird, T., ErbachSchoenberg, E., Tatem, A.J., 2015. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 12 (105), 20150073+. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2015.0073 .
  2. Banerjee, S., Gelfand, A.E., Polasek, W., 2000. Geostatistical modelling for spatial interaction data with application to postal service performance. Journal of statistical planning and inference 90(1), 87-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0378-3758(00)00111-7 .
 

Exploring the high-resolution mapping of gender-disaggregated development indicators

  
Journal of The Royal Society Interface, Vol. 14, No. 129. (05 April 2017), 20160825, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2016.0825

Abstract

Improved understanding of geographical variation and inequity in health status, wealth and access to resources within countries is increasingly being recognized as central to meeting development goals. Development and health indicators assessed at national or subnational scale can often conceal important inequities, with the rural poor often least well represented. The ability to target limited resources is fundamental, especially in an international context where funding for health and development comes under pressure. This has recently prompted the exploration of the potential ...

 

Supplementary Information from Exploring the high-resolution mapping of gender disaggregated development indicators

  

Abstract

[Excerpt: Datasets] The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) is a program of national household surveys implemented across a large number of LMICs. The DHS Program collects and analyses data on population demographic and health characteristics through more than 300 surveys in over 90 countries. The gender-disaggregated data we investigated in this report come from DHS datasets. [\n] [...] [Models specification] [::Bayesian model specification] The Gaussian Function (GF) in INLA is represented as a Gaussian Markov Random Function (GMRF). Computations in INLA are carried out using the GMRF by approximating a ...

References

  1. Alegana, V.A., Atkinson, P.M., Pezzulo, C., Sorichetta, A., Weiss, D., Bird, T., ErbachSchoenberg, E., Tatem, A.J., 2015. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications. Journal of The Royal Society Interface 12 (105), 20150073+. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2015.0073 .
  2. Bosco, C., de Rigo, D., Dijkstra, T.A., Sander, G., Wasowski, J., 2013. Multi-scale robust modelling of landslide susceptibility: regional rapid assessment and catchment robust fuzzy ensemble. IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology
 

The mismeasurement of science

  
Current Biology, Vol. 17, No. 15. (07 August 2007), pp. R583-R585, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2007.06.014

Abstract

[Excerpt:Impact factors and citations] Crucially, impact factors are distorted by positive feedback — many citations are not based on reading the paper but by reading other papers, particularly reviews. One study even suggested that, of cited articles, only some 20% had actually been read. [...] Nevertheless, citations are now being used to make quantitative comparisons between scientists. [...] [Changes in behaviour] Unfortunately, the use of these measures is having damaging effects on perceptions and on behaviour; these I list below. Please note that ...

 

Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals leads to lower world population growth

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 50. (13 December 2016), pp. 14294-14299, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611386113

Abstract

[Significance] The future of world population growth matters for future human well-being and interactions with the natural environment. We show the extent to which world population growth could be reduced by fully implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) whose health and education targets have direct and indirect consequences on future mortality and fertility trends. Although this assessment is consistent with the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways scenarios used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change context, it is inconsistent with the prediction range of ...

 

Encourage governments to heed scientific advice

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7622. (28 September 2016), pp. 587-587, https://doi.org/10.1038/537587a

Abstract

To stop evidence-based policy losing its clout, researchers need to engage with policymakers and understand their needs, says Bill Colglazier. [Excerpt] [...] Most governments do want to consider and harness science, technology and innovation. [...] Why, then, is science losing its clout in the current political debates? In my view, the explanation is relatively simple. In the short term, politics, or more precisely value judgements, trump science. This is especially true when there are scientific uncertainties. [\n] Value judgements come in three varieties. ...

 

Equality in maternal and newborn health: modelling geographic disparities in utilisation of care in five East African countries

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 8. (25 August 2016), e0162006, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162006

Abstract

Geographic accessibility to health facilities represents a fundamental barrier to utilisation of maternal and newborn health (MNH) services, driving historically hidden spatial pockets of localized inequalities. Here, we examine utilisation of MNH care as an emergent property of accessibility, highlighting high-resolution spatial heterogeneity and sub-national inequalities in receiving care before, during, and after delivery throughout five East African countries. We calculated a geographic inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility at 300 x 300 m using a dataset of 9,314 facilities ...

 

The past, present and future of the PhD thesis

  
Nature, Vol. 535, No. 7610. (6 July 2016), pp. 7-7, https://doi.org/10.1038/535007a

Abstract

Writing a PhD thesis is a personal and professional milestone for many researchers. But the process needs to change with the times. [Excerpt] According to one of those often-quoted statistics that should be true but probably isn’t, the average number of people who read a PhD thesis all the way through is 1.6. And that includes the author. More interesting might be the average number of PhD theses that the typical scientist — and reader of Nature — has read from start ...

 

The battle lines are drawn

  
Science, Vol. 353, No. 6294. (30 June 2016), pp. 38-38, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf9243

Abstract

[Excerpt] [\n] [...] In his new book, The War on Science, Shawn Otto documents the modern clash between what he calls the “authoritarians” (governments, large corporations, and religious groups) and the “antiauthoritarians” (scientists and other liberal thinkers). Drawing on recent examples ranging from the evolution debate to vaccine skepticism, Otto describes the emergence of an antiscience movement whose focus is to disrupt the creation of evidence-based policy for the sake of preserving profitable business models or entrenched religious dogma. [\n] Otto is at his ...

 

Promoting interdisciplinarity through climate change education

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 8. (14 July 2013), pp. 713-716, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1844

Abstract

Climate change is a complex scientific and social problem. Effectively dealing with it presents an immense challenge, yet educating students about it offers educators in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fruitful opportunities for promoting interdisciplinarity, retaining talented young people in STEM fields and enhancing multiple literacies of all students. We offer three illustrative examples of interdisciplinary climate change-related STEM education projects. Each of these models is designed deliberately for implementation in the first two years of collegiate-level STEM courses; thus, ...

 

On the cutting edge: teaching help for geoscience faculty

  
Science, Vol. 327, No. 5969. (25 February 2010), pp. 1095-1096, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183028

Abstract

In contrast to science, which makes progress at the level of the community and where individual work builds on all that has come before, teaching science has often been an individual enterprise. Typically, faculty create courses in isolation, without the benefit of knowledge of others' classroom experiences or research on how students learn (1, 2). Building a culture of sharing and communal improvement in support of undergraduate geoscience teaching is the goal of the On the Cutting Edge professional development program. ...

 

Education: animating possible worlds

  
Science, Vol. 308, No. 5718. (01 April 2005), pp. 29e-29e, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.308.5718.29e

Abstract

Global warming's future impact depends on factors such as human population growth and fossil fuel use. High school and introductory college classes can learn how these and other variables might influence temperatures, sea levels, and more at a new tutorial hosted by California State University, Los Angeles. The Java applet helps students work through scenarios for the future sketched by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. For example, animations illustrate flooding in areas such as Florida and Indonesia under different sets ...

 

Science 101: building the foundations for real understanding

  
Science, Vol. 330, No. 6012. (02 December 2010), pp. 1764-1765, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1186994

Abstract

It's not just about evolution anymore. Growing anti-science sentiment in the United States now infuses public discourse on conservation, vaccination, distribution of research funds, and climate change (1). Low rates of scientific literacy (2) exacerbate the problem. Although the public recognizes its indebtedness to the products of scientific knowledge, few understand much about the nature of that knowledge or the processes that generated it (3). Without a basic understanding of how science works, the public is vulnerable to antiscience propaganda, which ...

 

Climate confusion among U.S. teachers

  
Science, Vol. 351, No. 6274. (11 February 2016), pp. 664-665, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aab3907

Abstract

Although more than 95% of active climate scientists attribute recent global warming to human causes (1, 2) and most of the general public accepts that climate change is occurring, only about half of U.S. adults believe that human activity is the predominant cause (3), which is the lowest among 20 nations polled in 2014 (4). We examine how this societal debate affects science classrooms and find that, whereas most U.S. science teachers include climate science in their courses, their insufficient grasp ...

 

Climate change sparks battles in classroom

  
Science, Vol. 333, No. 6043. (04 August 2011), pp. 688-689, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.333.6043.688

Abstract

An informal survey this spring of 800 members of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) found that climate change was second only to evolution in triggering protests from parents and school administrators. Online message boards for science teachers tell similar tales. Unlike biology teachers defending the teaching of evolution, however, earth science teachers don't have the protection of the First Amendment's language about religion. But the teachers feel their arguments are equally compelling: Science courses should reflect the best scientific ...

 

Outside the pipeline: reimagining science education for nonscientists

  
Science, Vol. 340, No. 6130. (18 April 2013), pp. 314-317, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1230855

Abstract

Educational policy increasingly emphasizes knowledge and skills for the preprofessional “science pipeline” rather than helping students use science in daily life. We synthesize research on public engagement with science to develop a research-based plan for cultivating competent outsiders: nonscientists who can access and make sense of science relevant to their lives. Schools should help students access and interpret the science they need in response to specific practical problems, judge the credibility of scientific claims based on both evidence and institutional cues, ...

 

Global human capital: integrating education and population

  
Science, Vol. 333, No. 6042. (28 July 2011), pp. 587-592, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1206964

Abstract

Almost universally, women with higher levels of education have fewer children. Better education is associated with lower mortality, better health, and different migration patterns. Hence, the global population outlook depends greatly on further progress in education, particularly of young women. By 2050, the highest and lowest education scenarios—assuming identical education-specific fertility rates—result in world population sizes of 8.9 and 10.0 billion, respectively. Better education also matters for human development, including health, economic growth, and democracy. Existing methods of multi-state demography can ...

 

Arguing to learn in science: the role of collaborative, critical discourse

  
Science, Vol. 328, No. 5977. (22 April 2010), pp. 463-466, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183944

Abstract

Argument and debate are common in science, yet they are virtually absent from science education. Recent research shows, however, that opportunities for students to engage in collaborative discourse and argumentation offer a means of enhancing student conceptual understanding and students' skills and capabilities with scientific reasoning. As one of the hallmarks of the scientist is critical, rational skepticism, the lack of opportunities to develop the ability to reason and argue scientifically would appear to be a significant weakness in contemporary educational ...

 

ENSO as an integrating concept in Earth science

  
Science, Vol. 314, No. 5806. (2006), pp. 1740-1745, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1132588
Keywords: climate   education   el-nino   enso   uncertainty  

Abstract

The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle of alternating warm El Niño and cold La Niña events is the dominant year-to-year climate signal on Earth. ENSO originates in the tropical Pacific through interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, but its environmental and socioeconomic impacts are felt worldwide. Spurred on by the powerful 1997-1998 El Niño, efforts to understand the causes and consequences of ENSO have greatly expanded in the past few years. These efforts reveal the breadth of ENSO's influence on ...

 

Which people use which scientific papers? An evaluation of data from F1000 and Mendeley

  
Journal of Informetrics, Vol. 9, No. 3. (July 2015), pp. 477-487, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2015.04.001

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] This study used the Mendeley API to download Mendeley counts for a comprehensive F1000Prime data set. [::] F1000Prime is a post-publication peer review system for papers from the biomedical area. [::] The F1000 papers are provided with tags from experts in this area which can characterise a paper more exactly (such as “good for teaching”). [::] Regression models with Mendeley counts as dependent variables have been calculated. [::] In the case of a well written article that provides a good overview of a topic, ...

 

Bio-based economy in Europe: state of play and future potential - Part 2 Summary of position papers received in response to the European Commission's public on-line consultation

  

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] This report summarises the 35 position papers received from organisations directly or indirectly linked to the bio-based economy in response to the public consultation on the ‘bio-based economy for Europe: state of play and future potential’. [Definition of a bio-based economy] The respondents support a public goods-oriented global and coherent strategy for a sustainable bio-based economy focusing on a recycling community, conservation of ecosystems and equitable sharing. An alternative definition of the bio-economy could be: [\n]A public goods-oriented bio-based economy based on: [::] […] production paradigms that rely ...

 

What is the question?

  
Science, Vol. 347, No. 6228. (20 March 2015), pp. 1314-1315, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaa6146

Abstract

Over the past 2 years, increased focus on statistical analysis brought on by the era of big data has pushed the issue of reproducibility out of the pages of academic journals and into the popular consciousness (1). Just weeks ago, a paper about the relationship between tissue-specific cancer incidence and stem cell divisions (2) was widely misreported because of misunderstandings about the primary statistical argument in the paper (3). Public pressure has contributed to the massive recent adoption of reproducible research ...

Visual summary


 

Reproducible research can still be wrong: adopting a prevention approach

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 6. (11 February 2015), pp. 1645-1646, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1421412111

Abstract

[Excerpt] Reproducibility—the ability to recompute results—and replicability—the chances other experimenters will achieve a consistent result—are two foundational characteristics of successful scientific research. Consistent findings from independent investigators are the primary means by which scientific evidence accumulates for or against a hypothesis. Yet, of late, there has been a crisis of confidence among researchers worried about the rate at which studies are either reproducible or replicable. To maintain the integrity of science research and the public’s trust in science, the scientific community ...

Visual summary

 

Curricula for ICT in education - Version #1.01

  
(2013)

Abstract

[Overview] The National Policy on ICT in school education has set the goal of preparing youth to participate creatively in the establishment, sustenance and growth of a knowledge society leading to all round socio-economic development of the nation and to be geared for global competitiveness. The National Curriculum Framework which guides the teaching-learning effort in schools cautions that technology used as a mere medium to disseminate infor- mation tends to bypass the teacher. It expresses a firm belief that teachers and children ...

 

Universal education is key to enhanced climate adaptation

  
Science, Vol. 346, No. 6213. (28 November 2014), pp. 1061-1062, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1257975

Abstract

Over the coming years, enormous amounts of money will likely be spent on adaptation to climate change. The international community recently made pledges of up to $100 billion per year by 2020 for the Green Climate Fund. Judging from such climate finance to date, funding for large projects overwhelmingly goes to engineers to build seawalls, dams, or irrigation systems (1). But with specific projections of future changes in climate in specific locations still highly uncertain, such heavy concrete (in both meanings) ...

 

Seven complex lessons in education for the future

  
(2001)

Abstract

Examines fundamental problems often overlooked or neglected in education. These problems are presented as "seven complex lessons" that should be covered in an education of the future in all societies in every culture, according to means and rules appropriate to those societies and cultures. ...

 

Cyberinfrastructure vision for 21st century discovery

  
No. NSF 07-28. (2007)

Abstract

[Executive summary] NSF’s Cyberinfrastructure Vision for 21st Century Discovery is presented in a set of interrelated chapters that describe the various challenges and opportunities in the complementary areas that make up cyberinfrastructure: computing systems, data, information resources, networking, digitally enabled-sensors, instruments, virtual organizations, and observatories, along with an interoperable suite of software services and tools. This technology is complemented by the interdisciplinary teams of professionals that are responsible for its development, deployment and its use in transformative approaches to scientific and ...

 

Uprooting researchers can drive them out of science

  
Nature, Vol. 510, No. 7505. (18 June 2014), pp. 313-313, https://doi.org/10.1038/510313a

Abstract

Making early-career scientists change institutions frequently is disruptive and — with modern technology — unnecessary, says Russell Garwood. [Excerpt] For some scientists, of course, the opportunity to move around is wonderful. It is perfect for people with wanderlust, who lack personal ties or who thrive in varied surroundings and on ephemeral contracts. However, for many others this migration-centred system is hugely disruptive, and can add to the forces that squeeze talented scientists out of academia and into other careers. The ‘young’ people ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 11

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: doronicum-hungaricum   doronicum-orientale   dothistroma-pini   dothistroma-septosporum   downscaling   dracaena-draco   dracaena-drago   drinking-water   drought-stress   drought-tolerance   droughts   dry-summers   dry-years   dryas-octopetala   dryocoetus-autographus   dryocopus-martius   dss   dublin-core   duplicated-entry-to-be-removed   durio-zibethinus   dutch-elm   dutch-elm-disease   dynamic-data-driven-application-system   dynamic-downscaling   dynamic-programming   dynamic-vegetation-models   e-obs   e-rusle   early-dissemination   early-medieval   earth-observation   earth-system   earthquakes   east-africa   east-china-see   east-europe   ebola   ecological-change   ecological-corridor   ecological-footprint   ecological-networks   ecological-restoration   ecological-zones   ecology   economic-impacts   economic-value   economics   economy-bias   ecophysiology   ecoprovinces   ecosystem   ecosystem-change   ecosystem-conservation   ecosystem-decline   ecosystem-disservices   ecosystem-functions   ecosystem-heterogeneity   ecosystem-invasibility   ecosystem-management   ecosystem-processes   ecosystem-resilience   ecosystem-services   ecotype   edge-effect   edible-plants   editorial   editorial-policy   education   eemian   efdac   effective-gene-flow   effectiveness   effects   efficienct   effis   eficp   efics   efsa   efsa-scientific-opinion   egypt   el-nino   elaeagnus-angustifolia   elatobium-abietinum   elderberry-wine   electronics   elevation   elisa   ellenberg-climatic-quotient   ellenberg-numbers   elm-phloem-necrosis   elsevier   emergency-events   emergency-management   emergent-engineering   emergent-property   empetrum-nigrum   empirical-equation   emulation   end-of-history-bias   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Core foundations of abstract geometry

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, No. 35. (27 August 2013), pp. 14191-14195, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1312640110

Abstract

Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious geometric representations that guide their navigation and their analysis of object shape? In what way might these early-arising representations support later-developing Euclidean intuitions? To approach these questions, we investigated the relations among young children’s use of geometry in tasks assessing: navigation; visual form analysis; and the interpretation of symbolic, purely geometric maps. ...

 

Interdisciplinary graduate training in teaching labs

  
Science, Vol. 338, No. 6114. (21 December 2012), pp. 1542-1543, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1216570

Abstract

Modern research and training in the life sciences require cross-disciplinary programs, integrating concepts and methods from biology, physics, chemistry, and mathematics. We describe the structure and outcomes from an example of one such approach, the Physiology Course at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and discuss how similar intensive, team-building research courses are also being applied to improve graduate education in universities. These courses are based on teaching laboratories that have students address contemporary research questions by combining ...

 

Enhancing transdisciplinary dialogue in curricula development

  
Ecological Economics, Vol. 38, No. 1. (July 2001), pp. 1-5, https://doi.org/10.1016/s0921-8009(01)00168-9

Abstract

A crucial step towards realizing transdisciplinary understanding is to address transdisciplinary issues in university curricula, and to train students in critically analyzing and understanding disciplinary metaphors. We present an experimental exercise at Stockholm University with the aim of finding a constructive way to introduce transdisciplinary elements in disciplinary courses and thus increase student awareness of disciplinary metaphors. The exercise required a minimum of formal university decision procedures and thus circumvented the institutional barriers that tend to obstruct the establishment of full ...

 

Higher education's sustainability imperative: how to practically respond?

  
International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Vol. 13, No. 1. (2012), pp. 19-33, https://doi.org/10.1108/14676371211190281

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe four phases for how universities have addressed a sustainability agenda and offer specific lessons for how and where experiences on one campus, the University of Colorado Boulder, have been met with success and other challenges. The authors offer general reflections for executing university-wide sustainability initiatives with a central intent of illuminating central barriers against, and incentives for, a coordinated and integrated approach to campus sustainability. Design/methodology/approach – The approach for arriving at ...

 

The literacies of science

  
In Crossing borders in literacy and science instruction: perspectives on theory and practice (2004), pp. 33-47, https://doi.org/10.1598/0872075192.2
edited by E. Wendy Saul

Abstract

One starting point for a dialogue between literacy education and science education is the way in which science uses multiple literacies. Literacy education usually begins with an emphasis on language and on texts: how they're made, what they mean. Science education begins with questions about how things happen in the world. We might imagine a scientist studying literacy to be a bit like an ethnographer. An ethnographer of science and its literacies will come across other scientists making and using texts, ...

 

More than the sum of their parts? Interdisciplinarity and sustainability

  
In Sustainability education : perspectives and practice across higher education (2010)
 

Learning for change: an educational contribution to sustainability science

  
Sustainability Science, Vol. 8, No. 1. (January 2013), pp. 103-119, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-012-0181-5

Abstract

Transition to sustainability is a search for ways to improve the social capacity to guide interactions between nature and society toward a more sustainable future and, thus, a process of social learning in its broadest sense. Accordingly, it is not only learning that is at issue but education and educational science, of which the latter is about exploring the preconditions of and opportunities for learning and education—whether individual or social, in formal or informal settings. Analyzing how educational science deals with ...

 

Diffusion of sustainable development in universities’ curricula: an empirical example from Cardiff University

  
Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 18, No. 7. (17 May 2010), pp. 637-644, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2009.07.005

Abstract

During the last decade an increasing number of higher education institutions (HEIs) have been incorporating and institutionalizing the principles of Sustainable development (SD) into their curricula, research, operations, outreach, and assessment and reporting. This article focuses on the adoption and diffusion of SD in curricula by analyzing the results from the curricula audit of over 5800 course descriptions from 19 of the 28 schools from Cardiff University. The audit was done using the Sustainability Tool for Auditing UNiversities Curricula in Higher ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/education

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.