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Selection: with tag digital-society [24 articles] 

 

Reboot for the AI revolution

  
Nature, Vol. 550, No. 7676. (17 October 2017), pp. 324-327, https://doi.org/10.1038/550324a

Abstract

As artificial intelligence puts many out of work, we must forge new economic, social and educational systems, argues Yuval Noah Harari. [Excerpt] The ongoing artificial-intelligence revolution will change almost every line of work, creating enormous social and economic opportunities — and challenges. Some believe that intelligent computers will push humans out of the job market and create a new 'useless class'; others maintain that automation will generate a wide range of new human jobs and greater prosperity for all. Almost everybody agrees ...

 

To slow or not? Challenges in subsecond networks

  
Science, Vol. 355, No. 6327. (23 February 2017), pp. 801-802, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aai8618

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] today's electronic exchanges are an all-machine playing field with extreme subsecond operating times that lie far beyond the ∼1-s real-time response and intervention of any human. High-speed algorithms now receive, process, and respond to information on the scale of microseconds, and the only guaranteed future speed barrier is the speed of light. Hundreds of orders are executed across multiple exchange nodes within 1 ms (millisecond). [...] The need to develop a systems-level understanding concerning regulation in subsecond networks, is ...

 

Robots and free software

  
In A World with Robots, Vol. 84 (2017), pp. 63-76, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-46667-5_5

Abstract

This article examines whether the arguments put forward by Free Software advocates in the context of computers also apply for robots. It summarises their key arguments and explores whether or not they appear transferable to robot cases. Doing so, it comes to the conclusion that, in the majority of cases, the reasons that may make the use of Free Software over proprietary software preferable in other technologies, equally apply in the case of robots. ...

 

Chilling effects: online surveillance and Wikipedia use

  
Berkeley Technology Law Journal, Vol. 31, No. 1. (2016), 117

Abstract

This article discusses the results of the first empirical study providing evidence of regulatory “chilling effects” of Wikipedia users associated with online government surveillance. The study explores how traffic to Wikipedia articles on topics that raise privacy concerns for Wikipedia users decreased after the widespread publicity about NSA/PRISM surveillance revelations in June 2013. Using an interdisciplinary research design, the study tests the hypothesis, based on chilling effects theory, that traffic to privacy-sensitive Wikipedia articles reduced after the mass surveillance revelations. The ...

 

Involve social scientists in defining the Anthropocene

  
Nature, Vol. 540, No. 7632. (7 December 2016), pp. 192-193, https://doi.org/10.1038/540192a

Abstract

The causes of Earth's transition are human and social, write Erle Ellis and colleagues, so scholars from those disciplines must be included in its formalization. ...

 

Do voting advice applications have an effect on electoral participation and voter turnout? Evidence from the 2007 Swiss federal elections

  
In Electronic Participation, Vol. 6229 (2010), pp. 211-224, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15158-3_18

Abstract

Voting Advice Applications (VAAs) render a valuable platform for tackling one of democracy’s central challenges: low voter turnout. Studies indicate that lack of information and cost-benefit considerations cause voters to abstain from voting. VAAs are online voting assistance tools which match own political preferences with those of candidates and parties in elections. By assisting voters in their decision-making process prior to casting their votes, VAAs not only rebut rational choice reasoning against voting but also narrow existing information gaps. In this ...

 

Can Tweets Predict Citations? Metrics of Social Impact Based on Twitter and Correlation with Traditional Metrics of Scientific Impact

  
Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 13, No. 4. (16 December 2011), e123, https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.2012

Abstract

[Background] Citations in peer-reviewed articles and the impact factor are generally accepted measures of scientific impact. Web 2.0 tools such as Twitter, blogs or social bookmarking tools provide the possibility to construct innovative article-level or journal-level metrics to gauge impact and influence. However, the relationship of the these new metrics to traditional metrics such as citations is not known. [Objective] (1) To explore the feasibility of measuring social impact of and public attention to scholarly articles by analyzing buzz in social media, ...

 

Five years from now, CMOs will spend more on IT than CIOs do

  
(2014)

Abstract

[Excerpt] Marketing is now a fundamental driver of IT purchasing, and that trend shows no signs of stopping –or even slowing down –any time soon. In fact, Gartner analyst Laura McLellan recently predicted that by 2017, CMOs will spend more on IT than their counterpart CIOs. At first, that prediction may sound a bit over the top. (In just five years from now, CMOs are going to be spending more on IT than CIOs do?) But, consider this: 1) As ...

 

Digital diaspora in the enterprise: arrival of the CDO and CCO

  
(2014)

Abstract

While the C-suite sometimes seems too crowded today, it's also clear that technology is underrepresented in the leadership circle as digital in all its forms deeply infuses the modern organization. ...

 

Link decay in leading information science journals

  
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 58, No. 1. (01 January 2007), pp. 15-24, https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.20513

Abstract

Web citations have become common in scholarly publications as the amount of online literature increases. Yet, such links are not persistent and many decay over time, causing accessibility problems for readers. The present study investigates the link decay phenomenon in three leading information science journals. Articles spanning a period of 7 years (1997-2003) were downloaded, and their links were extracted. From these, a measure of link decay, the half-life, was computed to be approximately 5 years, which compares favorably against other ...

 

Accessibility and decay of web citations in five open access ISI journals

  
Internet Research, Vol. 22, No. 2. (2012), pp. 234-247, https://doi.org/10.1108/10662241211214584

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to scrutinize the accessibility and decay of web references (URLs) cited in five open access social sciences journals indexed by ISI. Design/methodology/approach – After acquiring all the papers published by these journals during 2002-2007, their web citations were extracted and analyzed from an accessibility point of view. Moreover, for initially missed citations complementary pathways such as using Internet Explorer and the Google search engine were employed. Findings – The study revealed that at first check ...

 

URL decay in MEDLINE—a 4-year follow-up study

  
Bioinformatics, Vol. 24, No. 11. (01 June 2008), pp. 1381-1385, https://doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btn127

Abstract

Motivation: Internet-based electronic resources, as given by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), are being increasingly used in scientific publications but are also becoming inaccessible in a time-dependant manner, a phenomenon documented across disciplines. Initial reports brought attention to the problem, spawning methods of effectively preserving URL content while some journals adopted policies regarding URL publication and begun storing supplementary information on journal websites. Thus, a reexamination of URL growth and decay in the literature is merited to see if the problem has ...

 

From computer ethics to responsible research and innovation in ICT: the transition of reference discourses informing ethics-related research in information systems

  
Information & Management (February 2014), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.im.2014.01.001

Abstract

The discourse concerning computer ethics qualifies as a reference discourse for ethics-related IS research. Theories, topics and approaches of computer ethics are reflected in IS. The paper argues that there is currently a broader development in the area of research governance, which is referred to as ‘responsible research and innovation’ (RRI). RRI applied to information and communication technology (ICT) addresses some of the limitations of computer ethics and points toward a broader approach to the governance of science, technology and innovation. ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 10

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: database   dataset   dating   dddas   de-facto-standard   dead-wood   debris   debris-floods   debris-flows   deciduous   deciduous-forest   decision-making   decision-making-procedure   decision-support-system   decline   decline-effect   decline-symptomology   deep-reproducible-research   deep-uncertainty   definition   deforestation   degenerated-soil   deglaciation   degradation   degradation-velocity   dehesas   delonix-regia   democracy   dendrochronology   dendroctonus   dendroctonus-frontalis   dendroctonus-micans   dendroctonus-ponderosae   dendroctonus-pseudotsugae   dendroecology   dendrology   denmark   density-related-behaviour   deposition   derived-data   desalinisation   description   desertification   deserts   design-diversity   devil-in-details   diabetes   diabetes-mellitus   diagram-data   diameter-differentiation   dictionary   die-off   dieback   diesel   differentiation   digital-preservation   digital-society   dimensional-analysis   dimensionality-reduction   dimensionless   dioryctria-splendidella   diospyros-kaki   diospyros-spp   diospyros-virginiana   diplodia-pinea   diprion-pini   dipteryx-panamensis   direct-reciprocity   disaster-recovery   disaster-response   disasters   discharge   disciplinary-barrier   disconcerting-learning   discount-rate   disease   diseases   disjunction   dispersal   dispersal-limitation   dispersal-models   dissent   distance-analysis   distance-correlation   distilled-gin   distribution   distribution-limit   disturbance-ecology   disturbance-interactions   disturbances   diversity   django   dna   dna-fingerprinting   dobrogea   dodonaea-viscosa   dormancy   dormouse   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Why free software is more important now than ever before

  
Wired, Vol. 2013, No. 9. (28 November 2013)

Abstract

[Excerpt] It is now 30 years since I launched the campaign for freedom in computing, that is, for software to be free or “libre” (we use that word to emphasize that we’re talking about freedom, not price). Some proprietary programs, such as Photoshop, are very expensive; others, such as Flash Player, are available gratis — either way, they subject their users to someone else’s power. Much has changed since the beginning of the free software movement: Most people in advanced countries now ...

 

Is digital inclusion a good thing? How can we make sure it is?

  
Communications Magazine, IEEE, Vol. 48, No. 2. (February 2010), pp. 112-118, https://doi.org/10.1109/mcom.2010.5402673

Abstract

Activities directed at "including" more people in the use of digital technology are predicated on the assumption that such inclusion is invariably a good thing. It appears so, when judged solely by immediate practical convenience. However, if we also judge in terms of human rights, whether digital inclusion is good or bad depends on what kind of digital world we are to be included in. If we wish to work toward digital inclusion as a goal, it behooves us to make ...

 

Free software, free society: selected essays of Richard M. Stallman

  
(2010)
edited by Joshua Gay

Abstract

Introduction (by Lawrence Lessig). Every generation has its philosopher — a writer or an artist who captures the imagination of a time. Sometimes these philosophers are recognized as such; often it takes generations before the connection is made real. But recognized or not, a time gets marked by the people who speak its ideals, whether in the whisper of a poem, or the blast of a political movement. Our generation has a philosopher. He is not an artist, or a ...

 

Facebook use predicts declines in subjective well-being in young adults

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 8. (14 August 2013), e69841, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069841

Abstract

Over 500 million people interact daily with Facebook. Yet, whether Facebook use influences subjective well-being over time is unknown. We addressed this issue using experience-sampling, the most reliable method for measuring in-vivo behavior and psychological experience. We text-messaged people five times per day for two-weeks to examine how Facebook use influences the two components of subjective well-being: how people feel moment-to-moment and how satisfied they are with their lives. Our results indicate that Facebook use predicts negative shifts on both of ...

 

The Case Against Patents

  
No. Working Paper 2012-035A. (June 2012), pp. 1-24, https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2148738

Abstract

Introduction. The case against patents can be summarized briefly: there is no empirical evidence that they serve to increase innovation and productivity, unless the latter is identified with the number of patents awarded – which, as evidence shows, has no correlation with measured productivity. This is at the root of the “patent puzzle”: in spite of the enormeous increase in the number of patents and in the strength of their legal protection we have neither seen a dramatic acceleration in the rate ...

 

Open Letter on Software Patents from Linux developers

  
(21 September 2003)

Abstract

Open Letter to the Honourable Pat Cox, the President of the European Parliament, members of the European Parliament: Dear Mr. Cox, We have been following with growing concern that Europe has been extending patentability to computer programs. Now European Parliament is about to vote on a directive that could put a stop to this development, or make it worse, depending on how it is amended by the Parliament. US experience shows that, unlike traditional patents, software patents do not encourage innovation and R&D, quite ...

 

Does 'Strategic Patenting' Threaten Innovation? And What Could Happen If it Did

  
SSRN Electronic Journal (2012), https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1985495

Abstract

Recent buyouts of Nortel’s patent portfolios by a consortium including Microsoft, Apple and Sony and Motorola Mobility’s by Google have focused attention on the role of intellectual property (IP) in business strategies. IP changed a lot these last fifteen years. New patent-eligible subject matters (biotechnology, software) and regulatory developments in the United States have since the mid-80s led to a rapid growth of patenting, to a fast raise of patents’s value but also to the deterioration of their average quality. It also ...

 

Let’s limit the effect of software patents, since we can’t eliminate them

  
Wired In Solutions to the Software Patent Problem, Vol. 20, No. 11. (November 2012)

Abstract

Patents threaten every software developer, and the patent wars we have long feared have broken out. Software developers and software users – which in our society, is most people – need software to be free of patents. The patents that threaten us are often called “software patents,” but that term is misleading. Such patents are not about any specific program. Rather, each patent describes some practical idea, and says that anyone carrying out the idea can be sued. So it’s clearer to ...

 

Open data - An engine for innovation, growth and transparent governance

  
No. COM(2011) 882 final. (December 2011)
 

A Digital Agenda for Europe

  
No. COM(2010) 245 final/2. (August 2010)
This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/digital-society

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.