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Selection: with tag degradation [12 articles] 

 

Little evidence for fire-adapted plant traits in Mediterranean climate regions

  
Trends in Plant Science, Vol. 16, No. 2. (20 February 2011), pp. 69-76, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2010.10.007

Abstract

As climate change increases vegetation combustibility, humans are impacted by wildfires through loss of lives and property, leading to an increased emphasis on prescribed burning practices to reduce hazards. A key and pervading concept accepted by most environmental managers is that combustible ecosystems have traditionally burnt because plants are fire adapted. In this opinion article, we explore the concept of plant traits adapted to fire in Mediterranean climates. In the light of major threats to biodiversity conservation, we recommend caution in ...

 

Remote sensing monitoring of land restoration interventions in semi-arid environments with a before–after control-impact statistical design

  
International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, Vol. 59 (July 2017), pp. 42-52, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jag.2017.02.016

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] A rapid, standardised and objective assessment of the biophysical impact of restoration interventions is proposed. [::] The intervention impact is evaluated by a before–after control-impact sampling design. [::] The method provides a statistical test of the no-change hypothesis and the estimation of the relative magnitude of the change. [::] The method is applicable to NDVI and other remote sensing-derived variables. [Abstract] Restoration interventions to combat land degradation are carried out in arid and semi-arid areas to improve vegetation cover and land productivity. Evaluating the success ...

 

A review of the combination among global change factors in forests, shrublands and pastures of the Mediterranean Region: beyond drought effects

  
Global and Planetary Change, Vol. 148 (January 2017), pp. 42-54, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2016.11.012

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Different global change factors combine causing unprecedented ecological effects. [::] Much more complex interactions arise when combinations occur together. [::] Drought should be considered when designing and applying management policies. [::] Conserving Mediterranean terrestrial ecosystems is a collective effort. [Abstract] Climate change, alteration of atmospheric composition, land abandonment in some areas and land use intensification in others, wildfires and biological invasions threaten forests, shrublands and pastures all over the world. However, the impacts of the combinations between global change factors are not well understood despite ...

 

Estimating watershed degradation over the last century and its impact on water-treatment costs for the world’s large cities

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 32. (09 August 2016), pp. 9117-9122, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1605354113

Abstract

[Significance] Urban water-treatment costs depend on the water quality at the city’s source, which in turn depends on the land use in the source watersheds. Here, we show that globally urban source watershed degradation is widespread, with 9 in 10 cities losing significant amounts of natural land cover in their source watersheds to agriculture and development. This watershed degradation has impacted the cost of water treatment for about one in three large cities globally, increasing those costs by about half. This increase ...

 

From local scenarios to national maps: a participatory framework for envisioning the future of Tanzania

  
Ecology and Society, Vol. 21, No. 3. (2016), https://doi.org/10.5751/es-08565-210304

Abstract

Tackling societal and environmental challenges requires new approaches that connect top-down global oversight with bottom-up subnational knowledge. We present a novel framework for participatory development of spatially explicit scenarios at national scale that model socioeconomic and environmental dynamics by reconciling local stakeholder perspectives and national spatial data. We illustrate results generated by this approach and evaluate its potential to contribute to a greater understanding of the relationship between development pathways and sustainability. Using the lens of land use and land cover ...

 

The future of the Brazilian Amazon

  
Science, Vol. 291, No. 5503. (19 January 2001), pp. 438-439, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.291.5503.438

Abstract

The Brazilian Amazon is currently experiencing the world's highest absolute rate of forest destruction and is likely to suffer even greater degradation in the future because of government plans to invest $40 billion from 2000 to 2007 in dozens of major new highways and infrastructure projects. We developed two computer models that integrate spatial data on deforestation, logging, mining, highways and roads, navigable rivers, vulnerability to wildfires, protected areas, and existing and planned infrastructure projects, in an effort to predict the ...

 

Does land degradation increase poverty in developing countries?

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 5. (11 May 2016), e0152973, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0152973

Abstract

Land degradation is a global problem that particularly impacts the poor rural inhabitants of low and middle-income countries. We improve upon existing literature by estimating the extent of rural populations in 2000 and 2010 globally on degrading and improving agricultural land, taking into account the role of market access, and analyzing the resulting impacts on poverty. Using a variety of spatially referenced datasets, we estimate that 1.33 billion people worldwide in 2000 were located on degrading agricultural land (DAL), of which ...

 

Soil carbon sequestration impacts on global climate change and food security

  
Science, Vol. 304, No. 5677. (2004), pp. 1623-1627, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1097396

Abstract

The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon. The rate of soil organic carbon sequestration with adoption of recommended technologies depends on soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature, farming system, and soil management. Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, ...

 

Soil carbon stocks under present and future climate with specific reference to European ecoregions

  
Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, Vol. 81, No. 2. (1 June 2008), pp. 113-127, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10705-007-9147-x

Abstract

World soils and terrestrial ecosystems have been a source of atmospheric abundance of CO2 ever since settled agriculture began about 10–13 millennia ago. The amount of CO2-C emitted into the atmosphere is estimated at 136 ± 55 Pg from terrestrial ecosystems, of which emission from world soils is estimated at 78 ± 12 Pg. Conversion of natural to agricultural ecosystems decreases soil organic carbon (SOC) pool by 30–50% over 50–100 years in temperate regions, and 50–75% over 20–50 years in tropical climates. The projected global warming, with estimated increase in ...

 

Is my species distribution model fit for purpose? Matching data and models to applications

  
Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol. 24, No. 3. (February 2015), pp. 276-292, https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12268

Abstract

Species distribution models (SDMs) are used to inform a range of ecological, biogeographical and conservation applications. However, users often underestimate the strong links between data type, model output and suitability for end-use. We synthesize current knowledge and provide a simple framework that summarizes how interactions between data type and the sampling process (i.e. imperfect detection and sampling bias) determine the quantity that is estimated by a SDM. We then draw upon the published literature and simulations to illustrate and evaluate the ...

Visual summary

 

Ultimate drivers of native biodiversity change in agricultural systems

  
F1000Research, Vol. 2 (14 October 2013), 214, https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.2-214.v1

Abstract

The ability to address land degradation and biodiversity loss while maintaining the production of plant and animal products is a key global challenge. Biodiversity decline as a result of vegetation clearance, cultivation, grazing, pesticide and herbicide application, and plantation establishment, amongst other factors, has been widely documented in agricultural ecosystems. In this paper we identify six ultimate drivers that underlie these proximate factors and hence determine what native biodiversity occurs in modern agricultural landscapes; (1) historical legacies; (2) environmental change; (3) ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 10

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: database   dataset   dating   dddas   de-facto-standard   dead-wood   debris   debris-floods   debris-flows   deciduous   deciduous-forest   decision-making   decision-making-procedure   decision-support-system   decline   decline-effect   decline-symptomology   deep-reproducible-research   deep-uncertainty   definition   deforestation   degenerated-soil   deglaciation   degradation   degradation-velocity   dehesas   delonix-regia   democracy   dendrochronology   dendroctonus   dendroctonus-frontalis   dendroctonus-micans   dendroctonus-ponderosae   dendroctonus-pseudotsugae   dendroecology   dendrology   denmark   density-related-behaviour   deposition   derived-data   desalinisation   description   desertification   deserts   design-diversity   devil-in-details   diabetes   diabetes-mellitus   diagram-data   diameter-differentiation   dictionary   die-off   dieback   diesel   differentiation   digital-preservation   digital-society   dimensional-analysis   dimensionality-reduction   dimensionless   dioryctria-splendidella   diospyros-kaki   diospyros-spp   diospyros-virginiana   diplodia-pinea   diprion-pini   dipteryx-panamensis   direct-reciprocity   disaster-recovery   disaster-response   disasters   discharge   disciplinary-barrier   disconcerting-learning   discount-rate   disease   diseases   disjunction   dispersal   dispersal-limitation   dispersal-models   dissent   distance-analysis   distance-correlation   distilled-gin   distribution   distribution-limit   disturbance-ecology   disturbance-interactions   disturbances   diversity   django   dna   dna-fingerprinting   dobrogea   dodonaea-viscosa   dormancy   dormouse   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/degradation

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.