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Selection: with tag cooperation [67 articles] 

 

Science of preparedness

  
Science, Vol. 357, No. 6356. (14 September 2017), pp. 1073-1073, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aap9025

Abstract

Our hearts go out to those affected by hurricanes Harvey and Irma and by earlier monsoons across South Asia. These events are compelling reminders of the important role that science must play in preparing for disasters. But preparation is challenging, as reflected in the many facets of the “science of preparedness.” Certainly, modeling and forecasting storms are critical, but so are analyses of how agencies, communities, and individuals interact to understand and implement preparedness initiatives. [Excerpt] [...] Long-range estimates of the number ...

 

Behavioral self-organization underlies the resilience of a coastal ecosystem

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 30. (25 July 2017), pp. 8035-8040, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1619203114

Abstract

[Significance] Theoretical models suggest that spatial self-organization enhances the resistance of ecosystems to disturbance. However, experiments investigating this important prediction are lacking. Our paper provides clear experimental evidence that spatial self-organization profoundly increases the ability of ecosystems to persist in the face of disturbance. The mechanisms underlying this positive impact of self-organization are driven by the combination of ecological and behavioral processes. Specifically, large-scale banded patterns in mussel beds created by ecological feedback processes facilitate fast behavioral aggregation of individual mussels into ...

 

Regular patterns link individual behavior to population persistence

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 30. (25 July 2017), pp. 7747-7749, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1709063114

Abstract

[Excerpt] Resisting and recovering from disturbances is a necessity for most species. The strategy is sometimes collective, depending on the aggregation of interacting individuals into regular patterns. However, relating patterns of abundance across scales to both individual behavior and population persistence remains a major challenge for ecology. Such patterns are found in many ecosystems, ranging from microbes to forests, with their regularity taking the form of evenly sized and spaced bands and patches of aggregated individuals. Regular patterns are said to ...

 

The tragedy of the commons

  
Science, Vol. 162, No. 3859. (13 December 1968), pp. 1243-1248, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.162.3859.1243

Abstract

The population problem has no technical solution; it requires a fundamental extension in morality. [Excerpt] [...] A technical solution may be defined as one that requires a change only in the techniques of the natural sciences, demanding little or nothing in the way of change in human values or ideas of morality. In our day (though not in earlier times) technical solutions are always welcome. Because of previous failures in prophecy, it takes courage to assert that a desired technical solution is ...

 

When free software isn't (practically) superior

  
GNU Operating System (2011)

Abstract

[Excerpt] The Open Source Initiative's mission statement reads, “Open source is a development method for software that harnesses the power of distributed peer review and transparency of process. The promise of open source is better quality, higher reliability, more flexibility, lower cost, and an end to predatory vendor lock-in.” [\n] For more than a decade now, the Free Software Foundation has argued against this “open source” characterization of the free software movement. Free software advocates have primarily argued against this framing because ...

 

Collaborative influence - Develop five skills

  
Leadership Excellence, Vol. 22, No. 3. (March 2005), pp. 20-20

Abstract

[Excerpt] Organizations live or die on relationships. Your ability to create successful collaborative relationships can make or break your career. Effective executives have one skill in common — collaborative influence — the ability to get things done by getting people to collaborate and building strong collaborative networks. [Five Essential Skills] Five skills are essential to increasing your collaborative influence. [::1. Collaborative Intention] Maintaining a non-defensive presence and making a conscious personal commitment to seeking mutual gains in your relationships. [...] [::2. Truthfulness] Committing to ...

 

Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 11. (15 March 2016), pp. 2982-2987, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1518798113

Abstract

[Significance] The remarkable ecological success of the human species has been attributed to our capacity to overcome environmental challenges through the development of complex technologies. Complex technologies are typically beyond the inventive capacities of individuals and result from a population process by which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population’s ability to develop technologies is positively affected by its size and connectedness. Here, we present an experiment demonstrating that partially connected groups ...

 

The natural selection of bad science

  
Open Science, Vol. 3, No. 9. (01 September 2016), 160384, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160384

Abstract

Poor research design and data analysis encourage false-positive findings. Such poor methods persist despite perennial calls for improvement, suggesting that they result from something more than just misunderstanding. The persistence of poor methods results partly from incentives that favour them, leading to the natural selection of bad science. This dynamic requires no conscious strategizing—no deliberate cheating nor loafing—by scientists, only that publication is a principal factor for career advancement. Some normative methods of analysis have almost certainly been selected to further ...

 

Enabling open science: Wikidata for Research (Wiki4R)

  
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Vol. 1 (22 December 2015), e7573, https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.1.e7573

Abstract

Wiki4R will create an innovative virtual research environment (VRE) for Open Science at scale, engaging both professional researchers and citizen data scientists in new and potentially transformative forms of collaboration. It is based on the realizations that (1) the structured parts of the Web itself can be regarded as a VRE, (2) such environments depend on communities, (3) closed environments are limited in their capacity to nurture thriving communities. Wiki4R will therefore integrate Wikidata, the multilingual semantic backbone behind Wikipedia, into ...

 

Social semantics: altruism, cooperation, mutualism, strong reciprocity and group selection

  
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 20, No. 2. (1 March 2007), pp. 415-432, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2006.01258.x

Abstract

From an evolutionary perspective, social behaviours are those which have fitness consequences for both the individual that performs the behaviour, and another individual. Over the last 43 years, a huge theoretical and empirical literature has developed on this topic. However, progress is often hindered by poor communication between scientists, with different people using the same term to mean different things, or different terms to mean the same thing. This can obscure what is biologically important, and what is not. The potential for ...

 

Repression of competition and the evolution of cooperation

  
Evolution, Vol. 57, No. 4. (April 2003), pp. 693-705, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0014-3820.2003.tb00283.x

Abstract

Repression of competition within groups joins kin selection as the second major force in the history of life shaping the evolution of cooperation. When opportunities for competition against neighbors are limited within groups, individuals can increase their own success only by enhancing the efficiency and productivity of their group. Thus, characters that repress competition within groups promote cooperation and enhance group success. Leigh first expressed this idea in the context of fair meiosis, in which each chromosome has an equal chance ...

 

How chimpanzees cooperate in a competitive world

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 36. (06 September 2016), pp. 10215-10220, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611826113

Abstract

[Significance] Competitive tendencies may make it hard for members of a group to cooperate with each other. Humans use many different “enforcement” strategies to keep competition in check and favor cooperation. To test whether one of our closest relatives uses similar strategies, we gave a group of chimpanzees a cooperative problem that required joint action by two or three individuals. The open-group set-up allowed the chimpanzees a choice between cooperation and competitive behavior like freeloading. The chimpanzees used a combination of partner ...

 

Coordinate efforts on EU invasive species

  
Science, Vol. 353, No. 6303. (01 September 2016), pp. 998-998, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah6700

Abstract

[Excerpt] An ambitious move by the European Union to eradicate, or at least contain, 37 invasive alien species across the region may fail if Member States do not coordinate their efforts. Despite calls for the establishment of a coordinating authority and the recognition of the cost-effectiveness of such a body, the European Parliament had little appetite to fund another centralized regulatory body. It thus elected to establish only a legal framework without a dedicated body or resources to oversee its ...

 

Uncalculating cooperation is used to signal trustworthiness

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 31. (02 August 2016), pp. 8658-8663, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1601280113

Abstract

[Significance] Human prosociality presents an evolutionary puzzle, and reciprocity has emerged as a dominant explanation: cooperating today can bring benefits tomorrow. Reciprocity theories clearly predict that people should only cooperate when the benefits outweigh the costs, and thus that the decision to cooperate should always depend on a cost–benefit analysis. Yet human cooperation can be very uncalculating: good friends grant favors without asking questions, romantic love “blinds” us to the costs of devotion, and ethical principles make universal moral prescriptions. Here, we ...

 

Extraordinary intelligence and the care of infants

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 25. (21 June 2016), pp. 6874-6879, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1506752113

Abstract

[Significance] One mystery of human evolution is why our cognition differs qualitatively from our closest evolutionary relatives. Here we show how natural selection for large brains may lead to premature newborns, which themselves require more intelligence to raise, and thus may select for even larger brains. As we show, these dynamics can be self-reinforcing and lead to runaway selection for extremely high intelligence and helpless newborns. We test a prediction of this account: the helplessness of a primate’s newborns should strongly predict ...

 

Three lessons rarely taught

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6291. (June 2016), pp. 1358-1358, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.352.6291.1358

Abstract

[Excerpt] After earning two advanced degrees, completing three postdocs, working in three countries, and finally reaching the stage when I am setting up my own lab, I realize that three lessons taught by three great mentors have influenced how I think about doing science. These lessons, each of which came at just the right time in my career, have helped me probe new intellectual territories and enjoy my work. [\n] [...] [::Play around] The first lesson came from my Ph.D. supervisor in my ...

 

Small groups and long memories promote cooperation

  
Scientific Reports, Vol. 6 (1 June 2016), 26889, https://doi.org/10.1038/srep26889

Abstract

Complex social behaviors lie at the heart of many of the challenges facing evolutionary biology, sociology, economics, and beyond. For evolutionary biologists the question is often how group behaviors such as collective action, or decision making that accounts for memories of past experience, can emerge and persist in an evolving system. Evolutionary game theory provides a framework for formalizing these questions and admitting them to rigorous study. Here we develop such a framework to study the evolution of sustained collective action ...

 

Orchestrating a powerful group

  
Science, Vol. 352, No. 6283. (14 April 2016), pp. 378-378, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.352.6283.378

Abstract

[Excerpt] As I entered my assistant professor years in the early 1990s and worked to assemble my research team, I considered each candidate individually. I took on students based on grades and test scores, and my relationships with them were one-on-one. I didn't consider their teamwork abilities or soft skills—or the group dynamic as a whole. [...] [\n] [...] I now think of each group member as a critical puzzle piece for my collective. I assemble teams of individuals with different but complementary ...

 

Studying evolving software ecosystems based on ecological models

  
In Evolving Software Systems (2014), pp. 297-326, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-45398-4_10

Abstract

Research on software evolution is very active, but evolutionary principles, models and theories that properly explain why and how software systems evolve over time are still lacking. Similarly, more empirical research is needed to understand how different software projects co-exist and co-evolve, and how contributors collaborate within their encompassing software ecosystem. In this chapter, we explore the differences and analogies between natural ecosystems and biological evolution on the one hand, and software ecosystems and software evolution on the other hand. The aim is to learn from research in ...

 

Grant giving: global funders to focus on interdisciplinarity

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 7569. (16 September 2015), pp. 313-315, https://doi.org/10.1038/525313a

Abstract

Granting bodies need more data on how much they are spending on work that transcends disciplines, and to what end, explains Rick Rylance. [Excerpt] Three arguments are often made in favour of interdisciplinary research. [::] First, complex modern problems such as climate change and resource security are not amenable to single-discipline investigation; they often require many types of expertise across the biological, physical and social disciplines. [::] Second, discoveries are said to be more likely on the boundaries between fields, where the ...

 

Interdisciplinarity: how to catalyse collaboration

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 7569. (16 September 2015), pp. 315-317, https://doi.org/10.1038/525315a

Abstract

Turn the fraught flirtation between the social and biophysical sciences into fruitful partnerships with these five principles, urge Rebekah R. Brown, Ana Deletic and Tony H. F. Wong. [Excerpt] An urgent push to bridge the divide between the biophysical and the social sciences is crucial. It is the only way to drive global sustainable development that delivers social inclusion, environmental sustainability and economic prosperity1. Sustainability is the classic 'wicked' problem, characterized by poorly defined requirements, unclear boundaries and contested causes that no ...

 

Interdisciplinary research by the numbers

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 7569. (16 September 2015), pp. 306-307, https://doi.org/10.1038/525306a

Abstract

An analysis reveals the extent and impact of research that bridges disciplines. [Excerpt] Interdisciplinary work is considered crucial by scientists, policymakers and funders — but how widespread is it really, and what impact does it have? Scholars say that the concept is complex to define and measure, but efforts to map papers by the disciplines of the journals they appear in and by their citation patterns are — tentatively — revealing the growth and influence of interdisciplinary research. [\n][...] [Interdisciplinary research takes time to ...

Visual summary

 

Why interdisciplinary research matters

  
Nature, Vol. 525, No. 305. (2015), https://doi.org/10.1038/525305a

Abstract

Scientists must work together to save the world. A special issue asks how they can scale disciplinary walls. [Excerpt] Scientists must work together to save the world. A special issue asks how they can scale disciplinary walls. To solve the grand challenges facing society — energy, water, climate, food, health — scientists and social scientists must work together. But research that transcends conventional academic boundaries is harder to fund, do, review and publish — and those who attempt it struggle for recognition ...

 

Bio-based economy in Europe: state of play and future potential - Part 2 Summary of position papers received in response to the European Commission's public on-line consultation

  

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] This report summarises the 35 position papers received from organisations directly or indirectly linked to the bio-based economy in response to the public consultation on the ‘bio-based economy for Europe: state of play and future potential’. [Definition of a bio-based economy] The respondents support a public goods-oriented global and coherent strategy for a sustainable bio-based economy focusing on a recycling community, conservation of ecosystems and equitable sharing. An alternative definition of the bio-economy could be: [\n]A public goods-oriented bio-based economy based on: [::] […] production paradigms that rely ...

 

Collective credit allocation in science.

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 111, No. 34. (26 August 2014), pp. 12325-12330, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1401992111

Abstract

[Significance] The increasing dominance of multiauthor papers is straining the credit system of science: although for single-author papers, the credit is obvious and undivided, for multiauthor papers, credit assignment varies from discipline to discipline. Consequently, each research field runs its own informal credit allocation system, which is hard to decode for outsiders. Here we develop a discipline-independent algorithm to decipher the collective credit allocation process within science, capturing each coauthor’s perceived contribution to a publication. The proposed method provides scientists and policy-makers ...

 

Competitive science: is competition ruining science?

  
Infection and Immunity, Vol. 83, No. 4. (01 April 2015), pp. 1229-1233, https://doi.org/10.1128/iai.02939-14

Abstract

Science has always been a competitive undertaking. Despite recognition of the benefits of cooperation and team science, reduced availability of funding and jobs has made science more competitive than ever. Here we consider the benefits of competition in providing incentives to scientists and the adverse effects of competition on resource sharing, research integrity, and creativity. The history of science shows that transformative discoveries often occur in the absence of competition, which only emerges once fields are established and goals are defined. ...

 

A decline in prosocial language helps explain public disapproval of the US Congress

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 21. (26 May 2015), pp. 6591-6594, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1500355112

Abstract

[Significance] Past laboratory research has shown that talking about helping others can make a positive impression upon a listener. We tested whether this basic social-cognitive phenomenon can help explain how governments gain the confidence of the public they serve. A computerized text analysis of the debates of the US Congress over the past 20 y found that the density of prosocial language strongly predicted public approval ratings 6 mo later. These results suggest that both individuals and governments can gain social approval ...

 

Two-Person Cooperative Games

  
Econometrica, Vol. 21, No. 1. (1953), pp. 128-140, https://doi.org/10.2307/1906951

Abstract

In this paper, the author extends his previous treatment of 'The Bargaining Problem" to a wider class of situations in which threats can play a role. A new approach is introduced involving the elaboration of the threat concept. [Introduction] The theory presented here was developed to treat economic (or other) situations involving two individuals whose interests are neither completely opposed nor completely coincident. The word cooperative is used because the two individuals are supposed to be able to discuss the situation ...

 

Core services: reward bioinformaticians

  
Nature, Vol. 520, No. 7546. (8 April 2015), pp. 151-152, https://doi.org/10.1038/520151a

Abstract

Biological data will continue to pile up unless those who analyse it are recognized as creative collaborators in need of career paths, says Jeffrey Chang. [Excerpt] The US Precision Medicine Initiative, announced in January, relies on bioinformatics. The US$215-million project calls for collecting medical, physiological and genomic data from more than one million people in the United States, and aims to find patterns across individuals to improve health care. It does not address a worsening deficiency in the scientific community: biological data ...

 

Collapse of cooperation in evolving games

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 49. (9 December 2014), pp. 17558-17563, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1408618111

Abstract

[Significance] This study offers a new perspective on an age-old question: When does cooperation emerge in populations? Two-player games used to study this question produce an array of counterintuitive results. And yet a consensus has emerged that, in an evolving population, cooperation tends to triumph over cheating––through reciprocity and generosity. But, what happens when players can influence not only their tendencies to cooperate, but also the rewards they reap for cooperation? We analyze coevolution of strategies and payoffs and find that, ...

 

The Open Science Peer Review Oath

  
F1000Research (12 November 2014), https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.5686.1

Abstract

One of the foundations of the scientific method is to be able to reproduce experiments and corroborate the results of research that has been done before. However, with the increasing complexities of new technologies and techniques, coupled with the specialisation of experiments, reproducing research findings has become a growing challenge. Clearly, scientific methods must be conveyed succinctly, and with clarity and rigour, in order for research to be reproducible. Here, we propose steps to help increase the transparency of the scientific ...

References

  1. Ioannidis JP: Why most published research findings are false. PLoS Med. 2005; 2(8): e124.
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  3. Prinz F, Schlange T, Asadullah K: Believe it or not: how much can we rely on published data on potential drug targets? Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2011; 10(9): 712.
  4. Hines WC,
 

Cooperation and control in multiplayer social dilemmas

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 46. (18 November 2014), pp. 16425-16430, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1407887111

Abstract

[Significance] Many of the world’s most pressing problems, like the prevention of climate change, have the form of a large-scale social dilemma with numerous involved players. Previous results in evolutionary game theory suggest that multiplayer dilemmas make it particularly difficult to achieve mutual cooperation because of the lack of individual control in large groups. Herein, we extend the theory of zero-determinant strategies to multiplayer games to describe which strategies maintain cooperation. Moreover, we propose two simple models of alliances in multiplayer ...

References

  1. Hardin G (1968) The tragedy of the commons. The population problem has no technical solution; it requires a fundamental extension in morality. Science 162(3859):1243–1248.
  2. Olson M (1971) The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups (Harvard Univ Press, Cambridge, MA), Revised Ed.
  3. Nowak MA (2006) Five rules for the evolution of cooperation. Science 314(5805): 1560–1563.
  4. Boyd R, Richerson PJ (1988) The evolution of reciprocity
 

Competitive interactions between forest trees are driven by species' trait hierarchy, not phylogenetic or functional similarity: implications for forest community assembly

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 15, No. 8. (August 2012), pp. 831-840, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01803.x

Abstract

The relative importance of competition vs. environmental filtering in the assembly of communities is commonly inferred from their functional and phylogenetic structure, on the grounds that similar species compete most strongly for resources and are therefore less likely to coexist locally. This approach ignores the possibility that competitive effects can be determined by relative positions of species on a hierarchy of competitive ability. Using growth data, we estimated 275 interaction coefficients between tree species in the French mountains. We show that ...

 

The influence of phylogenetic relatedness on species interactions among freshwater green algae in a mesocosm experiment

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 102, No. 5. (September 2014), pp. 1288-1299, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12271

Abstract

1. A long-standing hypothesis in ecology and evolutionary biology is that closely related species are more ecologically similar to each other and therefore compete more strongly than distant relatives do. A recent hypothesis posits that evolutionary relatedness may also explain the prevalence of mutualisms, with facilitative interactions being more common among distantly related species. Despite the importance of these hypotheses for understanding the structure and function of ecological communities, experimental tests to determine how evolutionary relatedness influences competition ...

 

Evolutionary history and the strength of species interactions: testing the phylogenetic limiting similarity hypothesis

  
Ecology, Vol. 95, No. 5. (May 2014), pp. 1407-1417, https://doi.org/10.1890/13-0986.1

Abstract

A longstanding concept in community ecology is that closely related species compete more strongly than distant relatives. Ecologists have invoked this “limiting similarity hypothesis” to explain patterns in the structure and function of biological communities and to inform conservation, restoration, and invasive-species management. However, few studies have empirically tested the validity of the limiting similarity hypothesis. Here we report the results of a laboratory microcosm experiment in which we used a model system of 23 common, co-occurring North American freshwater green ...

 

The effect of problem severity, managerial and organizational capacity, and agency structure on intergovernmental collaboration: evidence from local emergency management

  
Public Administration Review, Vol. 70, No. 2. (March 2010), pp. 279-288, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-6210.2010.02134.x

Abstract

Like most public managers nowadays, local emergency managers operate within complex, uncertain environments. Rapid changes in the scope and severity of the issues increase the extent of intergovernmental collaboration necessary to address such challenges. Using a large data set of county emergency management agency directors, variations in intergovernmental collaboration reflect influences from problem severity, managerial capacity, and structural factors. The results demonstrate that public managers who perceive problems as severe, possess specific managerial skills, lead high-capacity organizations, and operate in less ...

 

The evolutionary origin of human hyper-cooperation

  
Nature Communications, Vol. 5 (27 August 2014), 4747, https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms5747

Abstract

Proactive, that is, unsolicited, prosociality is a key component of our hyper-cooperation, which in turn has enabled the emergence of various uniquely human traits, including complex cognition, morality and cumulative culture and technology. However, the evolutionary foundation of the human prosocial sentiment remains poorly understood, largely because primate data from numerous, often incommensurable testing paradigms do not provide an adequate basis for formal tests of the various functional hypotheses. We therefore present the results of standardized prosociality experiments in 24 groups ...

 

All models are wrong: reflections on becoming a systems scientist

  
Syst. Dyn. Rev., Vol. 18, No. 4. (1 December 2002), pp. 501-531, https://doi.org/10.1002/sdr.261

Abstract

Thoughtful leaders increasingly recognize that we are not only failing to solve the persistent problems we face, but are in fact causing them. System dynamics is designed to help avoid such policy resistance and identify high-leverage policies for sustained improvement. What does it take to be an effective systems thinker, and to teach system dynamics fruitfully? Understanding complex systems requires mastery of concepts such as feedback, stocks and flows, time delays, and nonlinearity. Research shows that these concepts are highly counterintuitive ...

 

Nurture your scientific curiosity early in your research career

  
Nature Genetics, Vol. 45, No. 2. (29 January 2013), pp. 116-118, https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.2527

Abstract

Uncertainty makes scientific research challenging and at the same time exciting. Whereas curiosity and passion for uncovering the unknown drive future generations of researchers, the landscape of science has changed. We investigated whether the requirements for having a successful research career are changing, and whether junior researchers are aware of these requirements. Structured discussion with peers and more experienced researchers can point the way forward to an excellent career. ...

 

Improving the culture of interdisciplinary collaboration in ecology by expanding measures of success

  
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 12, No. 1. (February 2014), pp. 39-47, https://doi.org/10.1890/120370

Abstract

[Abstract] Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential to understand ecological systems at scales critical to human decision making. Current reward structures are problematic for scientists engaged in interdisciplinary research, particularly early career researchers, because academic culture tends to value only some research outputs, such as primary-authored publications. Here, we present a framework for the costs and benefits of collaboration, with a focus on early career stages, and show how the implementation of novel measures of success can help defray the costs of collaboration. ...

 

Collaboration and productivity in scientific synthesis

  
BioScience, Vol. 61, No. 11. (01 November 2011), pp. 900-910, https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2011.61.11.9

Abstract

Scientific synthesis has transformed ecological research and presents opportunities for advancements across the sciences; to date, however, little is known about the antecedents of success in synthesis. Building on findings from 10 years of detailed research on social interactions in synthesis groups at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, we demonstrated with large-scale quantitative analyses that face-to-face interaction has been vital to success in synthesis groups, boosting the production of peer-reviewed publications. But it has been about more than ...

 

IDEO's culture of helping

  
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 2014, No. 1. (2014)

Abstract

[Excerpt] Few things leaders can do are more important than encouraging helping behavior within their organizations. In the top-performing companies it is a norm that colleagues support one another’s efforts to do the best work possible. That has always been true for pragmatic reasons: If companies were to operate at peak efficiency without what organizational scholars call “citizenship behavior,” tasks would have to be optimally assigned 100% of the time, projects could not take any unexpected turns, and no part ...

 

Harmonizing National Forest Inventories

  
Journal of Forestry (June 2009), pp. 179-187

Abstract

National forest inventories are a primary source of data for national and large area assessments of sustainability and biodiversity and for international forest resource reporting. However, the ability of countries to produce compatible estimates using these data is impeded by the diversity of their national inventory definitions, sampling designs, plot configurations, measured variables, and measurement protocols. In addition, because the differing features of these inventories have historical, commercial, and environmental justification, prospects for standardizing inventories are minimal. The best current alternative ...

 

What goes around comes around: knowledge hiding, perceived motivational climate, and creativity

  
Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 57, No. 1. (01 February 2014), pp. 172-192, https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2012.0122

Abstract

Knowledge hiding prevents colleagues from generating creative ideas, but it may also have negative consequences for the creativity of a knowledge hider. Drawing on social exchange theory, we propose that when employees hide knowledge, they trigger a reciprocal distrust loop in which coworkers are unwilling to share knowledge with them. We further suggest that these effects are contingent on motivational climate, in such a way that the negative effects of an individual's hiding knowledge on his/her own creativity are enhanced in ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 8

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: coldwaves   coleophora-laricella   collaborative-design   collection   collective-intelligence   colli-euganei   collinearity   colombia   colophospermum-mopane   color-photos   colorado   colutea-arborescens   combretum-imberbe   combustion-emission   command-line   common-bird-index   common-name-alder   common-name-ash   common-name-beech   common-name-yew   communicating-uncertainty   community   community-modelling   community-structure   community-structures   comparison   competition   complexes   complexity   complexity-vs-uncertainty   component-based   compsidia-populnea   compsilura-concinnata   computational-science   computational-science-automation   computer-science   cone-crop   conefor-sensinode   conflicts   congo   coniferales   coniferophyta   coniferopsida   conifers   connectivity   conocarpus-erectus   consensus   conservation   conservation-biology   conservation-strategies   console   constrained-innovation   constrained-spatial-multi-frequency-analysis   context-aware   continental-scale   continuity   control-problem   controversial-monetarisation   conyza-canadensis   cooperation   coppice   coppice-forest   coppice-sessile-oak   coppice-stools   copyleft   cordia-boissieri   cordia-sebestena   cork   cornus-florida   cornus-mas   cornus-nuttallii   cornus-officinalis   cornus-sanguinea   cornus-spp   coroebus-florentinus   correlation-analysis   correlative-approach   corridors   corrigenda   corroboration   corsica   corsican-nuthatch   corsican-pine   corylus-avellana   corylus-colurna   corylus-spp   corymbia-calophylla   cosmetic-use   cossus-cossus   cost-benefit-analysis   costal-dunes   costs   cotinus-coggygria   cotoneaster-integerrimus   cotoneaster-nebrodensis   cotoneaster-spp   cotton   couroupita-guianensis   cowania-mexicana   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Crowd-sourcing: strength in numbers

  
Nature, Vol. 506, No. 7489. (26 February 2014), pp. 422-423, https://doi.org/10.1038/506422a

Abstract

Researchers are finding that online, crowd-sourced collaboration can speed up their work if they choose the right problem. [Excerpt] [...] Yet this open approach has taken root as an ongoing crowd-sourcing project called Polymath. [...] Polymath 8 was a triumph for the collaborative approach, says Tao. If mathematicians had been attacking the problem in the standard way, with what he describes as “a flood of mini-papers”, it might have taken years to get the bound down that far. Polymath has not always ...

 

Parallel lines

  
Nature, Vol. 506, No. 7489. (26 February 2014), pp. 407-408, https://doi.org/10.1038/506407b

Abstract

A collaborative online mathematics project holds lessons for other disciplines. [Excerpt] Crowd-sourcing has reached mathematics, and at first glance it might seem as if this stereotypically solitary discipline is finally catching up with what other sciences have been doing for years. But, as we explore on page 422, the maths project Polymath, which invites participants to pitch in with ideas and results that might help to solve whatever problem the coordinator has set, is in some ways ahead of the curve. Not ...

 

The relationship between acquaintanceship and coauthorship in scientific collaboration networks

  
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 62, No. 11. (November 2011), pp. 2121-2132, https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21629

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between acquaintanceship and coauthorship patterns in a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, geographically distributed research center. Two social networks are constructed and compared: a network of coauthorship, representing how researchers write articles with one another, and a network of acquaintanceship, representing how those researchers know each other on a personal level, based on their responses to an online survey. Statistical analyses of the topology and community structure of these networks point to the importance of small-scale, local, personal networks ...

 

Climate policies under wealth inequality

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 6. (11 February 2014), pp. 2212-2216, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1323479111

Abstract

[Significance] One of the greatest challenges in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change, which involves public goods and common-pool resources, is achieving cooperation among peoples. There are great disparities in wealth among nations, and this heterogeneity can make agreements much more difficult to achieve (e.g., regarding implementation of climate change mitigation). This paper incorporates wealth inequality into a public goods dilemma, including an asymmetric distribution of wealth representative of existing inequalities among nations. Without homophily (imitation of like agents), ...

 

A bottom-up institutional approach to cooperative governance of risky commons

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 9. (14 July 2013), pp. 797-801, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1927

Abstract

Avoiding the effects of climate change may be framed as a public goods dilemma1, in which the risk of future losses is non-negligible2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, while realizing that the public good may be far in the future3, 7, 8, 9. The limited success of existing attempts to reach global cooperation has been also associated with a lack of sanctioning institutions and mechanisms to deal with those who do not contribute to the welfare of the planet or fail ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/cooperation

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Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.