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Selection: with tag climatic-niche-shift [27 articles] 

 

Divergence of species responses to climate change

  
Science Advances, Vol. 3, No. 5. (17 May 2017), e1603055, https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1603055

Abstract

Climate change can have profound impacts on biodiversity and the sustainability of many ecosystems. Various studies have investigated the impacts of climate change, but large-scale, trait-specific impacts are less understood. We analyze abundance data over time for 86 tree species/groups across the eastern United States spanning the last three decades. We show that more tree species have experienced a westward shift (73%) than a poleward shift (62%) in their abundance, a trend that is stronger for saplings than adult trees. The ...

 

Terrestrial ecosystems, soil and forests

  
In Climate change, impacts and vulnerability in Europe 2016 - An indicator-based report, Vol. 1/2017 (January 2017), pp. 153-182, https://doi.org/10.2800/534806

Abstract

[Excerpt: Key messages] [::] Observed climate change has had many impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, such as changes in soil conditions, advances in phenological stages, altitudinal and latitudinal migration of plant and animal species (generally northwards and upwards), and changes in species interactions and species composition in communities, including local extinctions. [::] The relative importance of climate change as a major driver of biodiversity and ecosystem change is projected to increase further in the future. In addition to climate change, human efforts to mitigate and adapt to ...

References

  1. Alkemade, R., Bakkenes, M., Eickhout, B., 2011. Towards a general relationship between climate change and biodiversity: An example for plant species in Europe. Regional Environmental Change 11, 143–150. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-010-0161-1 .
  2. Allen, C. D., Macalady, A. K., Chenchouni, H., Bachelet, D., McDowell, N., Vennetier, M., Kitzberger, T., Rigling, A., Breshears, D. D., Hogg, E. H. (Ted), Gonzalez, P., Fensham, R., Zhang, Z., Castro, J., Demidova, N., Lim, J.-H., Allard, G., Running, S. W., Semerci, A.,
 

Executive summary

  
In Climate change, impacts and vulnerability in Europe 2016 - An indicator-based report, Vol. 1/2017 (January 2017), pp. 12-30, https://doi.org/10.2800/534806

Abstract

[Excerpt: Key messages] [::] All of the key findings from the 2012 European Environment Agency (EEA) report on climate change, impacts and vulnerability in Europe are still valid. [::] Climate change is continuing globally and in Europe. Land and sea temperatures are increasing; precipitation patterns are changing, generally making wet regions in Europe wetter, particularly in winter, and dry regions drier, particularly in summer; sea ice extent, glacier volume and snow cover are decreasing; sea levels are rising; and climate-related extremes such as heat waves, heavy precipitation ...

References

  1. Ciscar, J.-C., Feyen, L., Soria, A., Lavalle, C., Raes, F., Perry, M., Nemry, F., Demirel, H., Rozsai, M., Dosio, A., Donatelli, M., Srivastava, A. K., Fumagalli, D., Niemeyer, S., Shrestha, S., Ciaian, P., Himics, M., Van Doorslaer, B., Barrios, S., Ibáñez, N., Forzieri, G., Rojas, R., Bianchi, A., Dowling, P., Camia, A., Libertà, G., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., Barredo, J. I., Paci, D., Pycroft, J., Saveyn, B., Van Regemorter, D., Revesz, T., Vandyck, T.,
 

Climate change, impacts and vulnerability in Europe 2016 - An indicator-based report

  
Vol. 1/2017 (January 2017), https://doi.org/10.2800/534806

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] Key messages [::] All of the key findings from the 2012 European Environment Agency (EEA) report on climate change, impacts and vulnerability in Europe are still valid. [::] Climate change is continuing globally and in Europe. Land and sea temperatures are increasing; precipitation patterns are changing, generally making wet regions in Europe wetter, particularly in winter, and dry regions drier, particularly in summer; sea ice extent, glacier volume and snow cover are decreasing; sea levels are rising; and climate-related extremes such as heat waves, heavy ...

 

Landscape genomics and a common garden trial reveal adaptive differentiation to temperature across Europe in the tree species Alnus glutinosa

  
Molecular Ecology, Vol. 23, No. 19. (1 October 2014), pp. 4709-4721, https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12813

Abstract

The adaptive potential of tree species to cope with climate change has important ecological and economic implications. Many temperate tree species experience a wide range of environmental conditions, suggesting high adaptability to new environmental conditions. We investigated adaptation to regional climate in the drought-sensitive tree species Alnus glutinosa (Black alder), using a complementary approach that integrates genomic, phenotypic and landscape data. A total of 24 European populations were studied in a common garden and through landscape genomic approaches. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used ...

 

Range expansions transition from pulled to pushed waves as growth becomes more cooperative in an experimental microbial population

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 25. (21 June 2016), pp. 6922-6927, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1521056113

Abstract

[Significance] Species undergo range shifts in response to changing climate or following an introduction to a new environment. Invasions often incur significant economic cost and threaten biodiversity. Ecological theory predicts two distinct types of expansion waves, pulled and pushed, depending on the degree of cooperativity in the population. Although pulled and pushed invasions differ dramatically in how population-level properties such as the expansion rate depend on the organism-level properties such as rates of growth and dispersal, these theoretical predictions have not been ...

 

Strong upslope shifts in Chimborazo's vegetation over two centuries since Humboldt

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (14 September 2015), 201509938, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1509938112

Abstract

[Significance] Tropical regions harbor the majority of the world’s biodiversity, but there is debate about whether montane species here are able to track global warming at the same rate as in temperate regions. By following in Humboldt's footsteps and revisiting his pioneering documentation of vegetation elevation ranges, we show that the limit of plant growth has already been strongly pushed upslope. Although the rate of plant range shifts matches that found in other studies, the total magnitude of change in vegetation and ...

Visual summary

 

Why does phenology drive species distribution?

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 365, No. 1555. (12 October 2010), pp. 3149-3160, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2010.0142

Abstract

Despite the numerous studies which have been conducted during the past decade on species ranges and their relationship to the environment, our understanding of how environmental conditions shape species distribution is still far from complete. Yet, some process-based species distribution models have been able to simulate plants and insects distribution at a global scale. These models strongly rely on the completion of the annual cycle of the species and therefore on their accomplished phenology. In particular, they have shown that the ...

 

Oak seedling survival and growth along resource gradients in Mediterranean forests: implications for regeneration in current and future environmental scenarios

  
Oikos, Vol. 117, No. 11. (28 October 2008), pp. 1683-1699, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2008.16814.x

Abstract

Understanding seedling performance across resource gradients is crucial for defining the regeneration niche of plant species under current environmental conditions and for predicting potential changes under a global change scenario. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to determine how seedling survival and growth of two evergreen and two deciduous Quercus species vary along gradients of light and soil properties in two Mediterranean forests with contrasting soils and climatic conditions. Half the seedlings were subjected to an irrigation treatment during the first ...

 

Unifying niche shift studies: insights from biological invasions

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 29, No. 5. (7 August 2014), pp. 260-269, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2014.02.009

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We propose a unifying framework for assessing niche shifts from empirical data. [::] We base it on a review of studies of niche changes during biological invasions. [::] It decomposes niche changes and accounts for environmental availability and analogy. [::] This unifying framework allows proper comparison of existing and future niche studies. [::] It can also guide management under global change and the design of niche change experiments. [Summary] Assessing whether the climatic niche of a species may change ...

 

Quantifying the benefit of early climate change mitigation in avoiding biodiversity loss

  
Nature Clim. Change, Vol. 3, No. 7. (12 July 2013), pp. 678-682, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1887

Abstract

Climate change is expected to have significant influences on terrestrial biodiversity at all system levels, including species-level reductions in range size and abundance, especially amongst endemic species1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. However, little is known about how mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions could reduce biodiversity impacts, particularly amongst common and widespread species. Our global analysis of future climatic range change of common and widespread species shows that without mitigation, 57±6% of plants and 34±7% of animals are likely to lose ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 7

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: chamaerops-humilis   change   change-factor   channel-network   chaos   characteristics   charcoal   charcoal-analysis   check-list   chemical-analisys   chemical-composition   chemical-control   chemicals   chemosystematics   chenopodium-spp   chernobyl   chestnut-disease   chile   chilopsis-linearis   chimborazo   china   chionosphaera-cuniculicola   chionosphaera-spp   chloroplast-dna   chlorosis   cholera   chorisia-speciosa   choristoneura-conflictana   choristoneura-fumiferana   choristoneura-spp   chorology   chosenia-arbutifolia   chromium   chrysomela-populi   chrysomela-scripta   chrysomela-tremulae   chrysophyllum-albidum   chrysoptharta-bimaculata   chytridiopsis-typographi   cinchona-pubescens   cinnamomum-camphora   circular-economy   cistus-spp   citation-errors   citation-metrics   citeulike   citizen-science   citizen-sensor   citrus-aurantium   classification   classification-trees   clc   clear-cutting   clematis-alpina   clematis-vitalba   cliamte-change   cliffs   climate   climate-change   climate-change-impacts   climate-change-velocity   climate-engineering   climate-equity   climate-extremes   climate-growth-relations   climate-history   climate-models   climate-policy   climate-projections   climate-signal   climate-zones   climatic-conditions   climatic-gradient   climatic-niche   climatic-niche-shift   clostera-anachoreta   clostera-anastomosis   cloud-condensation   cloud-formation   cloudiness   clusia-rosea   clustering   co-evolution   co2   coal   coastal-settlement   coastline   coccoloba-uvifera   cocos-nucifera   codelet   coeloides-bostrichorum   coffea-arabica   coffea-canephora   cognitive-biases   cognitive-breakdown   cognitive-complexity   cognitive-load   cognitive-structure   cold-tolerance   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

A Significant Upward Shift in Plant Species Optimum Elevation During the 20th Century

  
Science, Vol. 320, No. 5884. (27 June 2008), pp. 1768-1771, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1156831

Abstract

Spatial fingerprints of climate change on biotic communities are usually associated with changes in the distribution of species at their latitudinal or altitudinal extremes. By comparing the altitudinal distribution of 171 forest plant species between 1905 and 1985 and 1986 and 2005 along the entire elevation range (0 to 2600 meters above sea level) in west Europe, we show that climate warming has resulted in a significant upward shift in species optimum elevation averaging 29 meters per decade. The shift is ...

 

Poleward expansion of mangroves is a threshold response to decreased frequency of extreme cold events

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 2. (30 January 2013), pp. 201315800-727, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1315800111

Abstract

[Significance] Coastal mangrove forests support a diverse array of associated species and provide ecosystem services to human communities. Mangroves cannot tolerate extreme freezing temperatures and so are generally limited to tropical environments. However, climate change in the form of increasing temperatures has the potential to facilitate increases in mangrove abundance near tropical–temperate transition zones. Here, we use 28 y of satellite imagery to demonstrate that increases in mangrove area have already occurred along the northeast coast of Florida. These increases correspond ...

 

Climate change might drive the invasive tree Robinia pseudacacia into nature reserves and endangered habitats

  
Biological Conservation, Vol. 143, No. 2. (01 February 2010), pp. 382-390, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2009.10.024

Abstract

Static networks of nature reserves disregard the dynamics of species ranges in changing environments. In fact, climate warming has been shown to potentially drive endangered species out of reserves. Less attention has been paid to the related problem that a warmer climate may also foster the invasion of alien species into reserve networks. Here, we use niche-based predictive modelling to assess to which extent the Austrian Natura 2000 network and a number of habitat types of conservation value outside this network ...

 

Managing forests and fire in changing climates

  
Science, Vol. 342, No. 6154. (04 October 2013), pp. 41-42, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1240294

Abstract

With projected climate change, we expect to face much more forest fire in the coming decades. Policy-makers are challenged not to categorize all fires as destructive to ecosystems simply because they have long flame lengths and kill most of the trees within the fire boundary. Ecological context matters: In some ecosystems, high-severity regimes are appropriate, but climate change may modify these fire regimes and ecosystems as well. Some undesirable impacts may be avoided or reduced through global strategies, as well as ...

 

Vulnerability of Pinus cembra L. in the Alps and the Carpathian mountains under present and future climates

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 259, No. 4. (05 February 2010), pp. 750-761, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2009.10.001

Abstract

Proactive management should be applied within a forest conservation context to prevent extinction or degradation of those forest ecosystems that we suspect will be affected by global warming in the next century. The aim of this study is to estimate the vulnerability under climate change of a localized and endemic tree species Pinus cembra that occurs in the alpine timberline. We used the Random Forest ensemble classifier and available bioclimatic and ecological data to model present and future suitable areas for ...

 

Niche syndromes, species extinction risks, and management under climate change

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 28, No. 9. (September 2013), pp. 517-523, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2013.05.010

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Species can survive beyond the bounds of the fundamental niche. [::] The ‘tolerance niche’ informs extinction risk and management options. [::] Relations among the realized, fundamental, and tolerance niche can be examined. [::] These ‘niche syndromes’ have not previously been characterized. [::] Characterizing niche syndromes can advance basic and applied research goals. [Summary] The current distributions of species are often assumed to correspond with the total set of environmental conditions under which species can persist. When this assumption is incorrect, extinction risk estimated from species distribution ...

 

Changes in landscape structure in the northwestern Alps over the last 7000 years: lessons from soil charcoal

  
Journal of Vegetation Science, Vol. 11, No. 5. (October 2000), pp. 705-714, https://doi.org/10.2307/3236577

Abstract

Current land-use abandonment and the current rise in temperature in the Alps both suggest that tree limits may change. When it is assumed that the climate of the early mid-Holocene between 8000 and 5000 yr before present is analogous to that of the predicted climate of the late 21st century, palaeo-ecological studies of the early Holocene may provide data for the prediction of the vegetation pattern in a century from now. It appears that mid-Holocene charcoal assemblages can be used to ...

 

Effects of climate change on the distribution of Iberian tree species

  
Applied Vegetation Science, Vol. 11, No. 2. (April 2008), pp. 169-178, https://doi.org/10.3170/2008-7-18348

Abstract

Question: Will the predicted climate changes affect species distribution in the Iberian Peninsula? Location: Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal). Methods: We modelled current and future tree distributions as a function of climate, using a computational framework that made use of one machine learning technique, the random forest (RF) algorithm. This algorithm provided good predictions of the current distribution of each species, as shown by the area under the corresponding receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Species turnover, richness and the change in ...

 

Comparative phylogeography and postglacial colonization routes in Europe

  
Molecular Ecology, Vol. 7, No. 4. (April 1998), pp. 453-464, https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-294x.1998.00289.x

Abstract

The Quaternary cold periods in Europe are thought to have heavily influenced the amount and distribution of intraspecific genetic variation in both animals and plants. The phylogeographies of 10 taxa, including mammals (Ursus arctos, Sorex spp., Crocidura suaveolens, Arvicola spp.), amphibians (Triturus spp.), arthropods (Chorthippus parallelus), and plants (Abies alba, Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus spp.), were analysed to elucidate general trends across Europe. Only a small degree of congruence was found amongst the phylogeographies of the 10 taxa, but the ...

 

Central European vegetation response to abrupt climate change at 8.2 ka

  
Geology, Vol. 29, No. 6. (2001), pp. 551-554, https://doi.org/10.1130/0091-7613(2001)029<0551:cevrta>2.0.co;2

Abstract

Oxygen isotope records show, a major climatic reversal at 8.2 ka in Greenland and Europe. Annually laminated sediments from two lakes in Switzerland and Germany were sampled contiguously to assess the response of European vegetation to climate change ca. 8.2 ka with time resolution and precision comparable to those of the Greenland ice cores. The pollen assemblages show pronounced and immediate responses (0-20 yr) of terrestrial vegetation to the climatic change at 8.2 ka. A sudden collapse of Corylus avellana (hazel) ...

 

Crop pests and pathogens move polewards in a warming world

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 11. (1 September 2013), pp. 985-988, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1990

Abstract

Global food security is threatened by the emergence and spread of crop pests and pathogens. Spread is facilitated primarily by human transportation, but there is increasing concern that climate change allows establishment in hitherto unsuitable regions. However, interactions between climate change, crops and pests are complex, and the extent to which crop pests and pathogens have altered their latitudinal ranges in response to global warming is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate an average poleward shift of 2.7±0.8 km yr−1 since 1960, in observations ...

 

Impacts of climate change on natural forest productivity – evidence since the middle of the 20th century

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 12, No. 5. (May 2006), pp. 862-882, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2006.01134.x

Abstract

Changes to forest production drivers (light, water, temperature, and site nutrient) over the last 55 years have been documented in peer-reviewed literature. The main objective of this paper is to review documented evidence of the impacts of climate change trends on forest productivity since the middle of the 20th century. We first present a concise overview of the climate controls of forest production, provide evidence of how the main controls have changed in the last 55 years, followed by a core ...

 

Comment on “Climatic Niche Shifts Are Rare Among Terrestrial Plant Invaders”

  
Science, Vol. 338, No. 6104. (12 October 2012), pp. 193-193, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1225980

Abstract

Petitpierre et al. (Reports, 16 March 2012, p. 1344) conclude that niche shifts are rare for terrestrial plant invaders and that this justifies the use of correlative modeling to project species geographic ranges for biological invasions and climate change. We draw attention to the limitations of their conceptual assumptions and the importance of niche shifts excluded from their analyses. ...

 

Response to Comment on “Climatic Niche Shifts Are Rare Among Terrestrial Plant Invaders”

  
Science, Vol. 338, No. 6104. (12 October 2012), pp. 193-193, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1226051

Abstract

Webber et al. take a critical view of our findings that niche expansions are rare in plant invaders, arguing mainly that we did not include nonanalog climates in our analyses. Yet, their concerns include misunderstandings and go beyond the scope of our study, which was purposely restricted to analog climates. We further explain why our results remain robust to other factors of niche dynamics in the native range. We conclude that the implications of our findings remain valid for projections of ...

 

Climatic Niche Shifts Are Rare Among Terrestrial Plant Invaders

  
Science, Vol. 335, No. 6074. (16 March 2012), pp. 1344-1348, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1215933

Abstract

The assumption that climatic niche requirements of invasive species are conserved between their native and invaded ranges is key to predicting the risk of invasion. However, this assumption has been challenged recently by evidence of niche shifts in some species. Here, we report the first large-scale test of niche conservatism for 50 terrestrial plant invaders between Eurasia, North America, and Australia. We show that when analog climates are compared between regions, fewer than 15% of species have more than 10% of ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/climatic-niche-shift

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.