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Selection: with tag carbon-mitigation [27 articles] 

 

Natural climate solutions

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 44. (31 October 2017), pp. 11645-11650, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1710465114

Abstract

[Significance] Most nations recently agreed to hold global average temperature rise to well below 2 °C. We examine how much climate mitigation nature can contribute to this goal with a comprehensive analysis of “natural climate solutions” (NCS): 20 conservation, restoration, and/or improved land management actions that increase carbon storage and/or avoid greenhouse gas emissions across global forests, wetlands, grasslands, and agricultural lands. We show that NCS can provide over one-third of the cost-effective climate mitigation needed between now and 2030 to stabilize ...

 

Well below 2 °C: mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 39. (26 September 2017), pp. 10315-10323, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1618481114

Abstract

The historic Paris Agreement calls for limiting global temperature rise to “well below 2 °C.” Because of uncertainties in emission scenarios, climate, and carbon cycle feedback, we interpret the Paris Agreement in terms of three climate risk categories and bring in considerations of low-probability (5%) high-impact (LPHI) warming in addition to the central (∼50% probability) value. The current risk category of dangerous warming is extended to more categories, which are defined by us here as follows: >1.5 °C as dangerous; >3 ...

 

Three years to safeguard our climate

  
Nature, Vol. 546, No. 7660. (28 June 2017), pp. 593-595, https://doi.org/10.1038/546593a

Abstract

Christiana Figueres and colleagues set out a six-point plan for turning the tide of the world’s carbon dioxide by 2020. [Excerpt] [...] According to an April report1 (prepared by Carbon Tracker in London, the Climate Action Tracker consortium, the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany and Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut), should emissions continue to rise beyond 2020, or even remain level, the temperature goals set in Paris become almost unattainable. The UN Sustainable Development Goals that were agreed ...

 

Strengthening protected areas for biodiversity and ecosystem services in China

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 7. (14 February 2017), pp. 1601-1606, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1620503114

Abstract

[Significance] Following severe environmental degradation from rapid economic development, China is now advancing policies to secure biodiversity and ecosystem services. We report the first nationwide assessment, showing that protected areas (PAs) are not well delineated to protect either biodiversity or key ecosystem services. This serious deficiency exists in many countries. We propose creating a national park system in China to help guide development along a path of green growth, improving the well-being of both people and nature. This involves establishing new, strictly ...

 

GECO 2015 - Global energy and climate outlook: road to Paris

  
Vol. EUR 27239 EN (2015), https://doi.org/10.2791/198028

Abstract

This report presents the modelling work quoted in the EC communication "The Paris Protocol - a blueprint for tackling global climate change beyond 2020" in the EU's Energy Union package. It examines the effects of a Baseline scenario where current trends continue beyond 2020, and of a Global Mitigation scenario in line with keeping global warming below 2°C. The analysis uses the POLES and GEM-E3 models in a framework where economic welfare is maximised while tackling climate change. In the Baseline, ...

References

  1. Arezki, R., Blanchard, O., 2014. Seven Questions about the Recent Oil Price Slump. http://blog-imfdirect.imf.org/2014/12/22/seven-questions-about-the-recent-oil-price-slump .
  2. AR5 database, 2015. IPCC Assessment Report 5 database. https://secure.iiasa.ac.at/web-apps/ene/AR5DB/dsd?Action=htmlpage&page=welcome .
  3. Assunção, J., Gandour, C., Rocha, R., 2015. Deforestation slowdown in the Brazilian Amazon: prices or policies?. Environment and Development Economics, available on CJO2015. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355770X15000078 .
  4. BGR (German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources) 2013. Energy Study 2013.
 

Making forestry decisions with multiple criteria: a review and an assessment

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 255, No. 8-9. (May 2008), pp. 3222-3241, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2008.01.038

Abstract

This paper provides a survey of the literature on multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) applications to forestry problems undertaken in the last 30 years or so. More than 250 references regarding 9 forestry topics and 9 different MCDM approaches have been categorized and evaluated. This provides a unified source of references that could be useful for forest management students, researchers and practitioners. The paper ends with an assessment of the literature presented, aiming to reach some conclusions, as well as indicate future ...

 

Environmental tipping points significantly affect the cost−benefit assessment of climate policies

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, No. 15. (14 April 2015), pp. 4606-4611, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1503890112

Abstract

[Significance] Most current cost−benefit analyses of climate change suggest global climate policy should be relatively weak. However, relatively few studies account for the market or nonmarket impacts of passing environmental tipping points that cause abrupt and irreversible damages. We use a stochastic dynamic model of the climate and economy to quantify the effect of tipping points on climate change policy. We show that environmental tipping points can profoundly alter cost−benefit analysis, justifying a much more stringent climate policy, which takes the form ...

 

Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 47. (25 November 2014), pp. E5016-E5022, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1419550111

Abstract

[Significance] Land use is a principal driver of carbon emissions, either directly through land change processes such as deforestation or indirectly via transportation and industries supporting natural resource use. To minimize the effects of land use on the climate system, natural ecosystems are needed to offset gross emissions through carbon sequestration. Managing this critically important service must be achieved tactically if it is to be cost-effective. We have developed a high-resolution carbon mapping approach that can identify biogeographically explicit targets for carbon ...

 

Life cycle impacts of forest management and wood utilization on carbon mitigation: knowns and unknowns

  
Carbon Management, Vol. 2, No. 3. (June 2011), pp. 303-333, https://doi.org/10.4155/cmt.11.24

Abstract

This review on research on life cycle carbon accounting examines the complexities in accounting for carbon emissions given the many different ways that wood is used. Recent objectives to increase the use of renewable fuels have raised policy questions, with respect to the sustainability of managing our forests as well as the impacts of how best to use wood from our forests. There has been general support for the benefits of sustainably managing forests for carbon mitigation as expressed by the ...

 

IPCC fifth assessment synthesis report - Climate Change 2014 synthesis report

  
(1 November 2014)

Abstract

The Synthesis Report (SYR) of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) provides an overview of the state of knowledge concerning the science of climate change, emphasizing new results since the publication of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 (AR4). The SYR synthesizes the main findings of the AR5 (IPCC) based on contributions from Working Group I (The Physical Science Basis), Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability), and Working Group III (Mitigation of Climate Change), plus two additional IPCC reports ...

 

Greater ecosystem carbon in the Mojave Desert after ten years exposure to elevated CO2

  
Nature Clim. Change, Vol. 4, No. 5. (6 May 2014), pp. 394-397, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2184

Abstract

Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas inducing climate change. Increased global CO2 emissions, estimated at 8.4 Pg C yr−1 at present, have accelerated from 1% yr−1 during 1990–1999 to 2.5% yr−1 during 2000–2009 (ref. 1). The carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems is the greatest unknown in the global C budget because the actual magnitude, location and causes of terrestrial sinks are uncertain2; estimates of terrestrial C uptake, therefore, are often based on the residuals between direct measurements of the atmospheric ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 6

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: canopy-density   canopy-irradiance   canopy-opening   capnodis-miliaris   caragana-arborescens   carapa-guianensis   carbohydrates   carbon   carbon-cycle   carbon-dioxide-removal   carbon-emission   carbon-isotope-discrimination   carbon-mitigation   carbon-sequestration   carbon-stock   cardiaspina-fiscella   cardiovascular-benefit   carica-papaya   carnegiea-gigantea   carnivores   carpathian-region   carpinus-betulus   carpinus-cordata   carpinus-orientalis   carpinus-spp   cart   carya-illinoensis   carya-laciniosa   carya-ovata   carya-spp   carya-tomentosa   cascade-of-failures   cassia-fistula   castanea-crenata   castanea-dentata   castanea-mollissima   castanea-sativa   castanea-spp   castanopsis-eyrei   castanopsis-spp   casuarina-equisetifolia   catalonia   catalpa-ovata   catalpa-speciosa   catalpa-spp   catchment-scale   categorical-variables   cathaya-spp   cattle   caucasus   causal-networks   cavitation   ceanothus-thyrsiflorus   cecidomyiidae   cecropia-peltata   cedar-decline   cedrela-fissilis   cedrela-odorata   cedrus-atlantica   cedrus-brevifolia   cedrus-libani   ceiba-chodatii   ceiba-pentandra   cell-structure   cellular-automata   cellulose   celtis-australis   celtis-occidentalis   celtis-reticulata   celtis-spp   central-america   central-asia   central-china   central-europe   central-hardwood-forest   central-mediterranean   cerambycidae   ceratitis-cosyra   ceratocystis-coerulescens   ceratocystis-laricicola   ceratocystis-platani   ceratocystis-polonica   ceratocystis-spp   ceratonia-siliqua   ceratonia-spp   cercidium-microphyllum   cercis-siliquastrum   cercis-spp   cercocarpus-ledifolius   certification   cerura-vinula   chalara-fraxinea   chamaecyparis-lawsoniana   chamaecyparis-nootkatensis   chamaecyparis-obtusa   chamaecyparis-pisifera   chamaecyparis-spp   chamaecytisus-proliferus   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

The equity and legitimacy of markets for ecosystem services

  
Development and Change, Vol. 38, No. 4. (July 2007), pp. 587-613, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7660.2007.00425.x

Abstract

Markets for ecosystem services are being promoted across the developing world, amidst claims that the provision of economic incentives is vital to bring about resource conservation. This article argues that equity and legitimacy are also critical dimensions in the design and implementation of such markets, if social development goals beyond economic gains are to be achieved. The article examines this issue by focusing on two communities involved in a project for carbon sequestration services of forests in the state of Chiapas, ...

 

Carbon sequestration: Managing forests in uncertain times

  
Nature, Vol. 506, No. 7487. (12 February 2014), pp. 153-155, https://doi.org/10.1038/506153a

Abstract

Increasing both forest stocks and timber harvest will buy time while we learn more about how trees absorb carbon, say Valentin Bellassen and Sebastiaan Luyssaert. ...

 

Historical warming reduced due to enhanced land carbon uptake

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, No. 42. (15 September 2013), pp. 16730-16735, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1314047110

Abstract

[Significance] This article provides estimates of the climate benefits due to CO2 fertilization of the terrestrial biosphere. Without these benefits, the atmospheric CO2 concentration would have risen by ∼200 ppm since the preindustrial period instead of the observed ∼115 ppm (an 80% increase), and the global climate would have warmed by an additional 0.31 ± 0.06 °C (a 40% increase). These findings were obtained with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory comprehensive Earth System Model ESM2G. [Abstract] Previous studies have demonstrated ...

 

Wood: The fuel of the future

  
The Economist, No. Apr 6th, 2013. (2013)

Abstract

Excerpt: Which source of renewable energy is most important to the European Union? Solar power, perhaps? (Europe has three-quarters of the world’s total installed capacity of solar photovoltaic energy.) Or wind? The answer is neither. By far the largest so-called renewable fuel used in Europe is wood. ...

 

Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 106, No. 6. (10 January 2009), pp. 1704-1709, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0812721106

Abstract

The severity of damaging human-induced climate change depends not only on the magnitude of the change but also on the potential for irreversibility. This paper shows that the climate change that takes place due to increases in carbon dioxide concentration is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop. Following cessation of emissions, removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide decreases radiative forcing, but is largely compensated by slower loss of heat to the ocean, so that atmospheric temperatures do not drop significantly ...

 

Modeling the role of forests in a regional carbon mitigation plan

  
Renewable Energy, Vol. 52 (April 2013), pp. 175-182, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2012.09.060

Abstract

Biomass from the forest sector can be an important source of renewable energy and can contribute to climate change mitigation and bioenergy development. However, the removal of biomass from forests has significant impacts on the forest ecosystem. For instance, it modifies soil litter which is particularly important to preserve soil characteristics and to sustain a diversity of organisms. Our aim is to analyze alternatives of sustainable forest management and compare how they perform in terms of carbon savings in order to ...

 

Climate study highlights wedge issue

  
Science, Vol. 339, No. 6116. (11 January 2013), pp. 128-129, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.339.6116.128

Abstract

A 2004 paper estimates that humanity could stabilize rapidly rising annual carbon emissions at 2004 levels by 2054 if it embarked on seven massive campaigns that would each prevent 25 billion tons of carbon emissions over 5 decades; the options included building a fleet of nuclear reactors and ending tropical deforestation. The authors dubbed each campaign a "wedge," after the angular shapes formed on a graph used to illustrate the concept. Now, a new study has offered a provocative update to ...

 

Toward a different debate in environmental accounting: the cases of carbon and cost–benefit

  
Accounting, Organizations and Society, Vol. 34, No. 3-4. (April 2009), pp. 499-534, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aos.2008.03.002

Abstract

Many champions of environmental accounting suggest that calculating and internalizing ‘externalities’ is the solution to environmental problems. Many critics of neoliberalism counter that the spread of market-like calculations into ‘non-market’ spheres, is, on the contrary, itself at the root of such problems. This article proposes setting aside this debate and instead closely examining the concrete conflicts, contradictions and resistances engendered by environmental accounting techniques and the perpetually incomplete efforts of accountants and their allies to overcome them. In particular, it explores ...

 

Re-evaluation of forest biomass carbon stocks and lessons from the world's most carbon-dense forests

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 106, No. 28. (14 July 2009), pp. 11635-11640, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0901970106

Abstract

From analysis of published global site biomass data (n = 136) from primary forests, we discovered (i) the world's highest known total biomass carbon density (living plus dead) of 1,867 tonnes carbon per ha (average value from 13 sites) occurs in Australian temperate moist Eucalyptus regnans forests, and (ii) average values of the global site biomass data were higher for sampled temperate moist forests (n = 44) than for sampled tropical (n = 36) and boreal (n = 52) forests (n ...

 

Impacts of climate change on primary production and carbon sequestration of boreal Norway spruce forests: Finland as a model

  
Climatic Change (12 October 2012), pp. 1-15, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-012-0607-1

Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the potential impacts of climate change on the spatial patterns of primary production and net carbon sequestration in relation to water availability in Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) dominated forests throughout Finland (N 60°–N 70°). The Finnish climatic scenarios (FINADAPT) based on the A2 emission scenario were used. According to the results, the changing climate increases the ratio of evapotranspiration to precipitation in southern Finland, while it slightly decreases the ratio in ...

 

Comparison of uncertainties in carbon sequestration estimates for a tropical and a temperate forest

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 256, No. 3. (July 2008), pp. 237-245, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2008.04.010

Abstract

We compare uncertainty through sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the modelling framework CO2FIX V.2. We apply the analyses to a Central European managed Norway spruce stand and a secondary tropical forest in Central America. Based on literature and experience we use three standard groups to express uncertainty in the input parameters: 5%, 10% and 20%. Sensitivity analyses show that parameters exhibiting highest influence on carbon sequestration are carbon content, wood density and current annual increment of stems. Three main conclusions arise ...

 

Carbon accumulation in European forests

  
Nature Geoscience, Vol. 1, No. 7. (22 June 2008), pp. 425-429, https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo233

Abstract

European forests are intensively exploited for wood products, yet they also form a sink for carbon. European forest inventories, available for the past 50 years, can be combined with timber harvest statistics to assess changes in this carbon sink. Analysis of these data sets between 1950 and 2000 from the EU-15 countries excluding Luxembourg, plus Norway and Switzerland, reveals that there is a tight relationship between increases in forest biomass and forest ecosystem productivity but timber harvests grew more slowly. Encouragingly, ...

 

A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 259, No. 4. (05 February 2010), pp. 660-684, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2009.09.001

Abstract

Greenhouse gas emissions have significantly altered global climate, and will continue to do so in the future. Increases in the frequency, duration, and/or severity of drought and heat stress associated with climate change could fundamentally alter the composition, structure, and biogeography of forests in many regions. Of particular concern are potential increases in tree mortality associated with climate-induced physiological stress and interactions with other climate-mediated processes such as insect outbreaks and wildfire. Despite this risk, existing projections of tree mortality are ...

Visual summary

 

A Large and Persistent Carbon Sink in the World’s Forests

  
Science, Vol. 333, No. 6045. (19 August 2011), pp. 988-993, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1201609

Abstract

The terrestrial carbon sink has been large in recent decades, but its size and location remain uncertain. Using forest inventory data and long-term ecosystem carbon studies, we estimate a total forest sink of 2.4 ± 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C year–1) globally for 1990 to 2007. We also estimate a source of 1.3 ± 0.7 Pg C year–1 from tropical land-use change, consisting of a gross tropical deforestation emission of 2.9 ± 0.5 Pg C year–1 partially compensated ...

 

A GIS-based approach to evaluate biomass potential from energy crops at regional scale

  
Environmental Modelling & Software, Vol. 25, No. 6. (07 June 2010), pp. 702-711, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2009.11.008

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to propose a method to maximize energy production from arboreous and herbaceous dedicated crops given the characteristics of the local environment: geo-morphology, climate, natural heritage, current land use. The best energy crops available in the Italian panorama are identified and the problem of maximizing the bioenergy production over an entire regional area is formulated. Each cultivar is thus assigned to the suitable land accounting for sensitive parameters that characterize it and taking into account current ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/carbon-mitigation

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.