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Selection: with tag carbon-emission [42 articles] 

 

Trajectories of the Earth system in the Anthropocene

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (06 August 2018), 201810141, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1810141115

Abstract

We explore the risk that self-reinforcing feedbacks could push the Earth System toward a planetary threshold that, if crossed, could prevent stabilization of the climate at intermediate temperature rises and cause continued warming on a “Hothouse Earth” pathway even as human emissions are reduced. Crossing the threshold would lead to a much higher global average temperature than any interglacial in the past 1.2 million years and to sea levels significantly higher than at any time in the Holocene. We examine the ...

 

Where there is fire, there is smoke

  
Science, Vol. 361, No. 6400. (27 July 2018), pp. 341-341, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aau6672

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] High-intensity wildfires (those exceeding 200,000 kW/m2) in very high biomass forests may consume 9 to 14% of the biomass [...]. This is substantially less than half of the 140 to 450 tons of biomass per hectare consumed when logging slash (i.e., dense waste wood) is burned after logging operations in these same kinds of forest [...]. Moreover, such logging burns consume at least 10 times as much biomass as hazard reduction burns designed to reduce wildfire risk [...] ...

 

Uncertainty in forecasts of long-run economic growth

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (14 May 2018), 201713628, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1713628115

Abstract

[Significance] This study develops estimates of uncertainty in projections of global and regional per-capita economic growth rates through 2100, comparing estimates from expert forecasts and an econometric approach designed to analyze long-run trends and variability. Estimates from both methods indicate substantially higher uncertainty than is assumed in current studies of climate change impacts, damages, and adaptation. Results from this study suggest a greater than 35% probability that emissions concentrations will exceed those assumed in the most severe of the available climate change ...

 

Climate-vegetation-fire interactions and feedbacks: trivial detail or major barrier to projecting the future of the Earth system?

  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, Vol. 7, No. 6. (1 November 2016), pp. 910-931, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.428

Abstract

Fire is a complex process involving interactions and feedbacks between biological, socioeconomic, and physical drivers across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This complexity limits our ability to incorporate fire into Earth system models and project future fire activity under climate change. Conceptual, empirical, and process models have identified the mechanisms and processes driving fire regimes, and provide a useful basis to consider future fire activity. However, these models generally deal with only one component of fire regimes, fire frequency, and do ...

 

Pathways limiting warming to 1.5°C: a tale of turning around in no time?

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 376, No. 2119. (13 April 2018), 20160457, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2016.0457

Abstract

We explore the feasibility of limiting global warming to 1.5°C without overshoot and without the deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies. For this purpose, we perform a sensitivity analysis of four generic emissions reduction measures to identify a lower bound on future CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes. Final energy demand reductions and electrification of energy end uses as well as decarbonization of electricity and non-electric energy supply are all considered. We find the lower bound of ...

 

Land use strategies to mitigate climate change in carbon dense temperate forests

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 115, No. 14. (03 April 2018), pp. 3663-3668, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1720064115

Abstract

[Significance] Regional quantification of feasibility and effectiveness of forest strategies to mitigate climate change should integrate observations and mechanistic ecosystem process models with future climate, CO2, disturbances from fire, and management. Here, we demonstrate this approach in a high biomass region, and found that reforestation, afforestation, lengthened harvest cycles on private lands, and restricting harvest on public lands increased net ecosystem carbon balance by 56% by 2100, with the latter two actions contributing the most. Forest sector emissions tracked with our life ...

 

Why current negative-emissions strategies remain ‘magical thinking’

  
Nature, Vol. 554, No. 7693. (22 February 2018), pp. 404-404, https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-02184-x

Abstract

[Excerpt] Decarbonization of the world’s economy would bring colossal disruption of the status quo. It’s a desire to avoid that change — political, financial and otherwise — that drives many of the climate sceptics. Still, as this journal has noted numerous times, it’s clear that many policymakers who argue that emissions must be curbed, and fast, don’t seem to appreciate the scale of what’s required. [...] [\n] The 2015 Paris agreement gave politicians an answer: negative emissions. Technology to reduce the amount ...

 

Extreme weather explicitly blamed on humans for the first time

  
Nature, Vol. 552, No. 7685. (2017), pp. 291-292, https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-017-08808-y

Abstract

Scientists take the bold step of saying phenomena wouldn’t have happened without global warming. [Excerpt] [...] Now, for the first time, climate researchers are reporting that some weather events would have been outright impossible without the warming influence of humanity’s greenhouse-gas emissions. [\n] This kind of confident assertion rarely makes its way into the scientific literature. Yet it appeared in three studies included in a special annual edition of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) dedicated to attributing the causes of ...

 

The real cost of energy

  
Nature, Vol. 553, No. 7682. (2017), pp. S145-S147, https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-017-07510-3

Abstract

All energy production has environmental and societal effects. But calculating them — and pricing energy accordingly — is no easy task. [Excerpt] [...] Electricity production is rife with externalities. Mining for raw materials often causes water pollution, habitat destruction and socio-economic harm. Burning coal pollutes the air, sickening and killing people, and introduces toxic mercury into the aquatic food chain. Nuclear-power plants require the clean-up and maintenance of radioactive materials after decommissioning. Energy production uses water, sometimes at the expense of agriculture and ...

 

Warning signs for stabilizing global CO 2 emissions

  
Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 12, No. 11. (01 November 2017), 110202, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aa9662

Abstract

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels and industry comprise ~90% of all CO2 emissions from human activities. For the last three years, such emissions were stable, despite continuing growth in the global economy. Many positive trends contributed to this unique hiatus, including reduced coal use in China and elsewhere, continuing gains in energy efficiency, and a boom in low-carbon renewables such as wind and solar. However, the temporary hiatus appears to have ended in 2017. For 2017, we project emissions ...

 

Global carbon budget 2017

  
Earth System Science Data Discussions (13 November 2017), pp. 1-79, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-2017-123

Abstract

Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the "global carbon budget" – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify the five major components of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production ...

 

Towards real-time verification of CO2 emissions

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 7, No. 12. (13 November 2017), pp. 848-850, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-017-0013-9

Abstract

The Paris Agreement has increased the incentive to verify reported anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions with independent Earth system observations. Reliable verification requires a step change in our understanding of carbon cycle variability. [\n] Emissions of CO2 from fossil fuels and industry did not change from 2014 to 2016, yet there was a record increase in CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. This apparent inconsistency is explained by the response of the natural carbon cycle to the 2015–2016 El Niño event, but it raises ...

 

World’s carbon emissions set to spike by 2% in 2017

  
Nature, Vol. 551, No. 7680. (13 November 2017), https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2017.22995

Abstract

Increased coal use in China appears to be driving the first increase in global greenhouse-gas output since 2014. [Excerpt] [...] Humanity’s carbon emissions are likely to surge by 2% in 2017, driven mainly by increased coal consumption in China, scientists reported on 13 November. The unexpected rise would end a three-year period in which emissions have remained flat despite a growing global economy. [...] Several factors caused the world’s CO2 emissions to level out from 2014 to 2016, including an economic slowdown ...

 

Spreading like wildfire

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 7, No. 11. (November 2017), pp. 755-755, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3432

Abstract

The 2017 wildfire season has seen unusually high fire levels in many parts of the world, with extensive and severe fires occurring in Chile, the Mediterranean, Russia, the US, Canada and even Greenland. Is this a sign of things to come? [Excerpt] During January and February, Chile experienced what their president Michelle Bachelet called “The greatest forest disaster in our history”. The nation was not adequately equipped to tackle these fires, leading the government to enact a state of emergency and accept ...

 

Fossil CO2 and GHG emissions of all world countries

  
Vol. 107877 (2017), https://doi.org/10.2760/709792

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] [::Policy context] Part of the Paris Agreement is the implementation of a transparency framework to be implemented bottom-up based on the national GHG emission inventories of all Parties reported to the UNFCCC. In addition, 5-yearly global stocktakes are planned from 2023 onwards to monitor emission trends and the efforts of the individual Parties. Reported inventories however neither cover the entire globe, nor the entire time period. The Commission’s in-house Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) estimates anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions for all world countries thereby contributing ...

 

Forest fires

  
In EMEP/EEA air pollutant emission inventory guidebook 2016 - Technical guidance to prepare national emission inventories, Vol. 21/2016 (2016), 11.B, https://doi.org/10.2800/247535

Abstract

[Excerpt: Overview] This chapter describes emissions from (naturally or man-induced) burning of non-managed and managed forests and other vegetation, excluding agricultural burning of stubble, etc. This includes domestic fires (fuel wood-, crop residue-, dung and charcoal burning) as well as open vegetation fires (forest, shrub- , grass- and cropland burning). According to Barbosa (2006, personal communication), 95 % of the forest fires in the Mediterranean region are related to human impact (negligence, arson, etc.). For the boreal area, Molicone et al. (2006) estimate 87 % of forest ...

 

How have past fire disturbances contributed to the current carbon balance of boreal ecosystems?

  
Biogeosciences, Vol. 13, No. 3. (04 February 2016), pp. 675-690, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-675-2016

Abstract

Boreal fires have immediate effects on regional carbon budgets by emitting CO2 into the atmosphere at the time of burning, but they also have legacy effects by initiating a long-term carbon sink during post-fire vegetation recovery. Quantifying these different effects on the current-day pan-boreal (44–84° N) carbon balance and quantifying relative contributions of legacy sinks by past fires is important for understanding and predicting the carbon dynamics in this region. Here we used the global dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE–SPITFIRE (Organising Carbon and ...

 

Well below 2 °C: mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 39. (26 September 2017), pp. 10315-10323, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1618481114

Abstract

The historic Paris Agreement calls for limiting global temperature rise to “well below 2 °C.” Because of uncertainties in emission scenarios, climate, and carbon cycle feedback, we interpret the Paris Agreement in terms of three climate risk categories and bring in considerations of low-probability (5%) high-impact (LPHI) warming in addition to the central (∼50% probability) value. The current risk category of dangerous warming is extended to more categories, which are defined by us here as follows: >1.5 °C as dangerous; >3 ...

 

A new global burned area product for climate assessment of fire impacts

  
Global Ecology and Biogeography, Vol. 25, No. 5. (May 2016), pp. 619-629, https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12440

Abstract

[Aim] This paper presents a new global burned area (BA) product developed within the framework of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme, along with a first assessment of its potentials for atmospheric and carbon cycle modelling. [Innovation] Methods are presented for generating a new global BA product, along with a comparison with existing BA products, in terms of BA extension, fire size and shapes and emissions derived from biomass burnings. [Main conclusions] Three years of the global BA product were ...

 

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: science overview and knowledge needs

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 317 (April 2014), pp. 1-8, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.12.014

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Wildland fires have influenced the global carbon cycle for ∼420 million years. [::] Fire moves carbon among terrestrial and atmospheric pools. [::] Fires emit carbon dioxide (CO2), black carbon and other aerosols. [::] Climate change alters fire regimes, potentially increasing wildfire emissions. [::] The global carbon cycle accounting should include wildland fire emissions. [Abstract] Wildland fires have influenced the global carbon cycle for ∼420 million years of Earth history, interacting with climate to define vegetation characteristics and distributions, trigger abrupt ecosystem shifts, and move carbon among ...

 

Wildfires in a warmer climate: emission fluxes, emission heights, and black carbon concentrations in 2090-2099

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 121, No. 7. (16 April 2016), pp. 3195-3223, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015jd024142

Abstract

Global warming is expected to considerably impact wildfire activity and aerosol emission release in the future. Due to their complexity, the future interactions between climate change, wildfire activity, emission release, and atmospheric aerosol processes are still uncertain. Here we use the process-based fire model SPITFIRE within the global vegetation model JSBACH to simulate wildfire activity for present-day climate conditions and future Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). The modeled fire emission fluxes and fire radiative power serve as input for the aerosol-climate model ...

 

The trouble with negative emissions

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6309. (14 October 2016), pp. 182-183, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah4567

Abstract

In December 2015, member states of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, which aims to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2°C and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. The Paris Agreement requires that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission sources and sinks are balanced by the second half of this century. Because some nonzero sources are unavoidable, this leads to the abstract concept of “negative emissions,” the ...

 

Impact of anthropogenic climate change on wildfire across western US forests

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (10 October 2016), 201607171, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1607171113

Abstract

[Significance] Increased forest fire activity across the western United States in recent decades has contributed to widespread forest mortality, carbon emissions, periods of degraded air quality, and substantial fire suppression expenditures. Although numerous factors aided the recent rise in fire activity, observed warming and drying have significantly increased fire-season fuel aridity, fostering a more favorable fire environment across forested systems. We demonstrate that human-caused climate change caused over half of the documented increases in fuel aridity since the 1970s and doubled the ...

 

Fire history and the global carbon budget: a 1°x 1° fire history reconstruction for the 20th century

  
Global Change Biology, Vol. 11, No. 3. (March 2005), pp. 398-420, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2005.00920.x

Abstract

A yearly global fire history is a prerequisite for quantifying the contribution of previous fires to the past and present global carbon budget. Vegetation fires can have both direct (combustion) and long-term indirect effects on the carbon cycle. Every fire influences the ecosystem carbon budget for many years, as a consequence of internal reorganization, decomposition of dead biomass, and regrowth. We used a two-step process to estimate these effects. First we synthesized the available data available for the 1980s or 1990s ...

 

The FAOSTAT database of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture - IOPscience

  
Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 8, No. 1. (2013), 015009, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/8/1/015009

Abstract

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture, including crop and livestock production, forestry and associated land use changes, are responsible for a significant fraction of anthropogenic emissions, up to 30% according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Yet while emissions from fossil fuels are updated yearly and by multiple sources—including national-level statistics from the International Energy Agency (IEA)—no comparable efforts for reporting global statistics for agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) emissions exist: the latest complete assessment was the ...

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Tackle climate change in Europe

  
In MEPs' Action Plans for a One Planet Europe (2014)

Abstract

[Excerpt] In order to give certainty to investors and a clear position for international negotiations, the EU is developing a new framework of climate and energy laws for 2030. The recent European Parliament own-initiative report on the 2030 climate and energy targets goes further than the agreement reached by the European Council. A major weakness of the Commission’s assessment of the impact of decarbonisation is that it considers only costs, and fail to account for the benefits of climate and energy policies. WWF believes it is not ...

References

  1. DG for Climate Action, 2013. Special Eurobarometer 409 - Climate change. (pp.45-48). TNS Opinion and Social, European Commission, Brussels. http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/eb_special_419_400_en.htm#409
  2. European Commission, 2014. Commission staff working document impact assessment: Accompanying the document Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions A policy framework for climate and energy in the period from 2020 up to 2030. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/ALL/?uri=CELEX:52014SC0015
 

Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, No. 47. (25 November 2014), pp. E5016-E5022, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1419550111

Abstract

[Significance] Land use is a principal driver of carbon emissions, either directly through land change processes such as deforestation or indirectly via transportation and industries supporting natural resource use. To minimize the effects of land use on the climate system, natural ecosystems are needed to offset gross emissions through carbon sequestration. Managing this critically important service must be achieved tactically if it is to be cost-effective. We have developed a high-resolution carbon mapping approach that can identify biogeographically explicit targets for carbon ...

 

Consequences of climate change damages for economic growth

  
OECD Economics Department Working Papers, Vol. 2014, No. 1135. (2014)

Abstract

This report focuses on the effects of climate change impacts on economic growth. Simulations with the OECD’s dynamic global general equilibrium model ENV-Linkages assess the consequences of a selected number of climate change impacts in the various world regions at the macroeconomic and sectoral level. This is complemented with an assessment of very long-run implications, using the AD-RICE model. The analysis finds that the effect of climate change impacts on annual global GDP is projected to increase over time, leading to ...

References

  1. Agrawala, S. and S. Fankhauser (2008), “Economic Aspects of Adaptation to Climate Change”, OECD Publishing.
  2. Agrawala, S., F. Bosello, C. Carraro, E. De Cian, E. Lanzi, K.C. De Bruin and R.B. Dellink (2011), “Plan or React? Analysis of adaptation costs and benefits using Integrated Assessment Models”, Climate Change Economics, Vol. 2(3), pp. 175-208.
  3. Berrittella, M., Bigano, A., Roson, R. and R.S.J. Tol (2006), “A general equilibrium analysis of climate change
 

Quantifying fire-wide carbon emissions in interior Alaska using field measurements and Landsat imagery

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 119, No. 8. (1 August 2014), 2014JG002657, https://doi.org/10.1002/2014jg002657

Abstract

Carbon emissions from boreal forest fires are projected to increase with continued warming and constitute a potentially significant positive feedback to climate change. The highest consistent combustion levels are reported in interior Alaska and can be highly variable depending on the consumption of soil organic matter. Here we present an approach for quantifying emissions within a fire perimeter using remote sensing of fire severity. Combustion from belowground and aboveground pools was quantified at 22 sites (17 black spruce and five white ...

 

Climate impacts: Fire fuels change

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 4, No. 8. (August 2014), pp. 662-662, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2333

Abstract

[Excerpt] The burning of vegetation — biomass burning — impacts on climate and air pollution. The fires produce gases and particles that interact and change the atmosphere and clouds. Most biomass burning is human-caused, resulting from land-clearing and land-use change, with a small proportion due to natural causes. Mark Jacobson, of Stanford University, USA, uses a 3D global model to simulate biomass burning [...] Over a 20-year period, biomass burning caused a net temperature increase of 0.4 °C globally, largely because of ...

 

Effects of biomass burning on climate, accounting for heat and moisture fluxes, black and brown carbon, and cloud absorption effects

  
Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheres, Vol. 119, No. 14. (27 July 2014), 2014JD021861, https://doi.org/10.1002/2014jd021861

Abstract

This paper examines the effects on climate and air pollution of open biomass burning (BB) when heat and moisture fluxes, gases and aerosols (including black and brown carbon, tar balls, and reflective particles), cloud absorption effects (CAEs) I and II, and aerosol semidirect and indirect effects on clouds are treated. It also examines the climate impacts of most anthropogenic heat and moisture fluxes (AHFs and AMFs). Transient 20 year simulations indicate BB may cause a net global warming of ~0.4 K because ...

 

Forest Cover Changes in Tropical South and Central America from 1990 to 2005 and Related Carbon Emissions and Removals

  
Remote Sensing, Vol. 4, No. 5. (11 May 2012), pp. 1369-1391, https://doi.org/10.3390/rs4051369

Abstract

This paper outlines the methods and results for monitoring forest change and resulting carbon emissions for the 1990–2000 and 200–2005 periods carried out over tropical Central and South America. To produce our forest change estimates we used a systematic sample of medium resolution satellite data processed to forest change maps covering 1230 sites of 20 km by 20 km, each located at the degree confluence. Biomass data were spatially associated to each individual sample site so that annual carbon emissions could ...

 

An incentive mechanism for reducing emissions from conversion of intact and non-intact forests

  
Climatic Change In Climatic Change, Vol. 83, No. 4. (1 August 2007), pp. 477-493, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-006-9231-2

Abstract

This paper presents a new accounting mechanism in the context of the UNFCCC issue on reducing emissions from deforestation in developing countries, including technical options for determining baselines of forest conversions. This proposal builds on the recent scientific achievements related to the estimation of tropical deforestation rates and to the assessment of ‘intact’ forest areas. The distinction between ‘intact’ and ‘non intact’ forests used here arises from experience with satellite-based deforestation measurements and allows accounting for carbon losses from forest degradation. ...

 

Renewable energy: back the renewables boom

  
Nature, Vol. 507, No. 7492. (19 March 2014), pp. 300-302, https://doi.org/10.1038/507300a

Abstract

Low-carbon technologies are getting better and cheaper each year, but continued public-policy support is needed to sustain progress, says Jessika E. Trancik. [Excerpt] [...] Public policies to encourage the development and adoption of renewable-energy technologies are essential, because low-carbon performance is not visible to most consumers and carbon is not priced in the global market. [...] The speed of energy-technology innovation is only just coming to light as long-term data sets become available. My analyses of 30 or more years of data2–4 show ...

 

Modeling biomass burning and related carbon emissions during the 21st century in Europe

  
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 118, No. 4. (December 2013), pp. 1732-1747, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013jg002444

Abstract

In this study we present an assessment of the impact of future climate change on total fire probability, burned area, and carbon (C) emissions from fires in Europe. The analysis was performed with the Community Land Model (CLM) extended with a prognostic treatment of fires that was specifically refined and optimized for application over Europe. Simulations over the 21st century are forced by five different high-resolution Regional Climate Models under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B. Both original and bias-corrected ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 6

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: bracon-hylobii   brasil   brassica-spp   brassicaceae   brenneria-goodwinii   bretziella-fagacearum   britain   british-columbia   british-forestry   british-isles   british-native-trees   broadleaved   brosimum-rubescens   browsing   bryophyte   bryophytes   bsd-3clause   bucida-buceras   buddleja-spp   bugs   bulgaria   buprestidae   bureaucracy   burnt-area   burnt-scar-mapping   bursaphelenchus-xylophilus   bursera-simaruba   burundi   butea-monosperma   buteo-buteo   butterfly   buxus-colchicus   buxus-hyrcana   buxus-sempervirens   buxus-spp   by-products   byctiscus-betulae   byctiscus-populi   c   c-factor   c-plus-plus   cabi   calamagrostis-argentea   calcium   california   callophylum-brasiliense   calluna-vulgaris   calocedrus-decurrens   calophyllum-inophyllum   calorific-values   calotropis-procera   camellia-reticulata   cameraria-ohridella   campanula-spp   canada   cananga-odorata   cancer-treament   cancer-treatment   candida   candidatus-phytoplasma-ulmi   canis-aureus   canis-lupus   canker   canopy-density   canopy-irradiance   canopy-opening   capnodis-miliaris   capreolus-capreolus   caracal-caracal   caragana-arborescens   carapa-guianensis   carbohydrates   carbon   carbon-capture-and-storage   carbon-cycle   carbon-dioxide-fertilisation   carbon-dioxide-removal   carbon-emission   carbon-isotope-discrimination   carbon-mitigation   carbon-monoxide   carbon-sequestration   carbon-stock   cardiaspina-fiscella   cardiovascular-benefit   carduus-personata   carica-papaya   carnegiea-gigantea   carnivores   carpathian-region   carpinus-betulus   carpinus-caucasica   carpinus-cordata   carpinus-orientalis   carpinus-spp   cart   carya-illinoensis   carya-laciniosa   carya-ovata   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Rapid growth in CO2 emissions after the 2008–2009 global financial crisis

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 2, No. 1. (4 December 2011), pp. 2-4, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1332

Abstract

Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production grew 5.9% in 2010, surpassed 9 Pg of carbon (Pg C) for the first time, and more than offset the 1.4% decrease in 2009. The impact of the 2008–2009 global financial crisis (GFC) on emissions has been short-lived owing to strong emissions growth in emerging economies, a return to emissions growth in developed economies, and an increase in the fossil-fuel intensity of the world economy. ...

 

Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

  
Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 77 (October 2013), pp. 767-780, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2013.06.003

Abstract

We apply ensemble projection for future wildfire using output from 15 GCMs. We develop and evaluate both regressions and a parameterization for fire predictions. We investigate the impacts of climate change on fuel load by the midcentury. We examine fire-induced changes in OC/BC by the midcentury. We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046–2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables ...

 

Assessing REDD+ performance of countries with low monitoring capacities: the matrix approach

  
Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 7, No. 1. (01 March 2012), 014031, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/7/1/014031

Abstract

Estimating emissions from deforestation and degradation of forests in many developing countries is so uncertain that the effects of changes in forest management could remain within error ranges (i.e. undetectable) for several years. Meanwhile UNFCCC Parties need consistent time series of meaningful performance indicators to set credible benchmarks and allocate REDD+ incentives to the countries, programs and activities that actually reduce emissions, while providing social and environmental benefits. Introducing widespread measuring of carbon in forest land (which would be required to estimate ...

 

Game theory: building up cooperation

  
Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, No. 9. (14 July 2013), pp. 782-783, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1962

Abstract

Can we achieve the ambitious mitigation targets needed to avert dangerous global warming? Research now shows that local sanctioning institutions may succeed where global agreements fall short. ...

 

Dynamic data driven ensemble for wildfire behaviour assessment: a case study

  
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 413 (2013), pp. 11-22, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41151-9_2

Abstract

Wildfire information has long been collected in Europe, with particular focus on forest fires. The European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS) of the European Commission complements and harmonises the information collected by member countries and covers the forest fire management cycle. This latter ranges from forest fire preparedness to post-fire impact analysis. However, predicting and simulating fire event dynamics requires the integrated modelling of several sources of uncertainty. Here we present a case study of a novel conceptualization based on a Semantic ...

 

An architecture for adaptive robust modelling of wildfire behaviour under deep uncertainty

  
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, Vol. 413 (2013), pp. 367-380, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41151-9_35

Abstract

Wildfires in Europe - especially in the Mediterranean region - are one of the major treats at landscape scale. While their immediate impact ranges from endangering human life to the destruction of economic assets, other damages exceed the spatio-temporal scale of a fire event. Wildfires involving forest resources are associated with intense carbon emissions and alteration of surrounding ecosystems. The induced land cover degradation has also a potential role in exacerbating soil erosion and shallow landslides. A component of the complexity in assessing ...

Visual summary

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/carbon-emission

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.