From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Selection: with tag bias-toward-primacy-of-theory-over-reality [46 articles] 

 

Europe’s Joint Research Centre, although improving, must think bigger

  
Nature, Vol. 550, No. 7674. (3 October 2017), pp. 8-8, https://doi.org/10.1038/550008a

Abstract

External report criticizes lack of exploratory research. [Excerpt] The European Union’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) uses the label EU Science Hub now. Whether the rebranding will increase its profile is one question. What science gets done inside this hub is another. In response to that query, there is some positive news. It is doing what it should be, and doing it well: collecting scientific and technical evidence in support of EU policies. That’s according to the report of an external evaluation released ...

 

Fears rise for US climate report as Trump officials take reins

  
Nature, Vol. 548, No. 7665. (1 August 2017), pp. 15-16, https://doi.org/10.1038/548015a

Abstract

Officials at the US Environmental Protection Agency are consulting global-warming sceptics as they weigh up a technical review. ...

 

How to fight corruption

  
Science, Vol. 356, No. 6340. (26 May 2017), pp. 803-804, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aan0815

Abstract

Anticorruption initiatives are often put forth as solutions to problems of waste and inefficiency in government programs. It's easy to see why. So often, somewhere along the chain that links the many participants in public service provision or other government activities, funds may get stolen or misdirected, bribes exchanged for preferential treatment, or genuine consumers of public services supplemented by “ghost” users. As a result, corruption reduces economic growth and leaves citizens disillusioned and distrustful of government (1). It is tempting ...

 

Multitrait successional forest dynamics enable diverse competitive coexistence

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 13. (28 March 2017), pp. E2719-E2728, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1610206114

Abstract

[Significance] Walking through any forest, one is struck by the variety of plant forms coexisting. Given that all plants compete for the same basic resources, why is there not a single winner? Our study shows that when key ingredients common to all forests are accounted for—including disturbance events, competition for light, and two widely observed trait-based tradeoffs—models of niche differentiation predict forests of considerably greater diversity than was previously thought possible. In particular, our model accurately predicts the proliferation of species occupying ...

 

House bill no. 246, Indiana State Legislature, 1897

  
Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science, Vol. 45 (1935), pp. 206-210

Abstract

[Excerpt] This paper has grown out of a number of requests for information over a number of years, by students and others, concerning some supposed action taken by the Indiana State Legislature with regard to fixing the value of pi, that is, the result of dividing the length of the circumference of a circle by the length of its diameter, at a certain value that was different from the true value. Of course the interest in and wonder at such an action lies in the presumption of a ...

 

House bill no. 246 revisited

  
Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science, Vol. 84 (1974), pp. 374-399

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] In the year 1966 the State of Indiana celebrated the Sesquicentennial of its admission into statehood, and the Indiana Academy of Science joined in this observance with a number of appropriate activities. Among these was a program of invited papers on the history of the various sciences and of mathematics in the state over the 150-year period. [\n] For a small number of persons the association of "Indiana" and "mathematics" immediately brings to mind the true story of the attempt in 1897 of the state legislature to pass ...

 

Individuals and the variation needed for high species diversity in forest trees

  
Science, Vol. 327, No. 5969. (25 February 2010), pp. 1129-1132, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1183506

Abstract

In the past, explanations for high species diversity have been sought at the species level. Theory shows that coexistence requires substantial differences between species, but species-level data rarely provide evidence for such differences. Using data from forests in the southeastern United States, I show here that variation evident at the individual level provides for coexistence of large numbers of competitors. Variation among individuals within populations allows species to differ in their distributions of responses to the environment, despite the fact that ...

 

The politics of publication

  
Nature, Vol. 422, No. 6929. (20 March 2003), pp. 259-261, https://doi.org/10.1038/422259a

Abstract

Authors, reviewers and editors must act to protect the quality of research. Listen. All over the world scientists are fretting. [Excerpt] The decision about publication of a paper is the result of interaction between authors, editors and reviewers. Scientists are increasingly desperate to publish in a few top journals and are wasting time and energy manipulating their manuscripts and courting editors. As a result, the objective presentation of work, the accessibility of articles and the quality of research itself are being compromised. ...

 

Enhancing reproducibility for computational methods

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6317. (09 December 2016), pp. 1240-1241, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah6168

Abstract

Over the past two decades, computational methods have radically changed the ability of researchers from all areas of scholarship to process and analyze data and to simulate complex systems. But with these advances come challenges that are contributing to broader concerns over irreproducibility in the scholarly literature, among them the lack of transparency in disclosure of computational methods. Current reporting methods are often uneven, incomplete, and still evolving. We present a novel set of Reproducibility Enhancement Principles (REP) targeting disclosure challenges ...

 

Software and scholarship

  
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol. 40, No. 4. (2 October 2015), pp. 342-348, https://doi.org/10.1080/03080188.2016.1165456

Abstract

[excerpt] The thematic focus of this issue is to examine what happens where software and scholarship meet, with particular reference to digital work in the humanities. Despite the some seven decades of its existence, Digital Humanities continues to struggle with the implications, in the academic ecosystem, of its position between engineering and art. [...] [\n] [...] [\n] I will end with my own reflection on this topic of evaluation. Peer review of scholarly works of software continues to pose a particularly vexed challenge ...

 

Programmers, professors, and parasites: credit and co-authorship in computer science

  
Science and Engineering Ethics In Science and Engineering Ethics, Vol. 15, No. 4. (2009), pp. 467-489, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11948-009-9119-4

Abstract

This article presents an in-depth analysis of past and present publishing practices in academic computer science to suggest the establishment of a more consistent publishing standard. Historical precedent for academic publishing in computer science is established through the study of anecdotes as well as statistics collected from databases of published computer science papers. After examining these facts alongside information about analogous publishing situations and standards in other scientific fields, the article concludes with a list of basic principles that should be ...

 

Hyperauthorship: a postmodern perversion or evidence of a structural shift in scholarly communication practices?

  
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 52, No. 7. (2001), pp. 558-569, https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.1097

Abstract

Classical assumptions about the nature and ethical entailments of authorship (the standard model) are being challenged by developments in scientific collaboration and multiple authorship. In the biomedical research community, multiple authorship has increased to such an extent that the trustworthiness of the scientific communication system has been called into question. Documented abuses, such as honorific authorship, have serious implications in terms of the acknowledgment of authority, allocation of credit, and assigning of accountability. Within the biomedical world it has been proposed ...

 

Academic authorship: who, why and in what order?

  
Health Renaissance, Vol. 11, No. 2. (19 June 2013), https://doi.org/10.3126/hren.v11i2.8214

Abstract

We are frequently asked by our colleagues and students for advice on authorship for scientific articles. This short paper outlines some of the issues that we have experienced and the advice we usually provide. This editorial follows on from our work on submitting a paper1 and also on writing an academic paper for publication.2 We should like to start by noting that, in our view, there exist two separate, but related issues: (a) authorship and (b) order of authors. The issue of authorship centres on the notion of who can be ...

 

The ideal of a zero-waste humanity: philosophical reflections on the demand for a bio-based economy

  
Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, Vol. 28, No. 2. (2015), pp. 353-374, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10806-015-9538-y

Abstract

In this paper we inquire into the fundamental assumptions that underpin the ideal of the Bio-Based Economy (BBE) as it is currently developed . By interpreting the BBE from the philosophical perspective on economy developed by Georges Bataille, we demonstrate how the BBE is fully premised on a thinking of scarcity. As a result, the BBE exclusively frames economic problems in terms of efficient production, endeavoring to exclude a thinking of abundance and wastefulness. Our hypothesis is that this not only ...

 

Scientific advances: fallacy of perfection harms peer review

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7618. (31 August 2016), pp. 34-34, https://doi.org/10.1038/537034a

Abstract

[Excerpt] [...] The history of science has taught us that most progress has come from exploring flawed hypotheses and imperfect models. We must always strive for the better study, the better model, the better analysis. As experienced reviewers, however, we contend that seeking ultimate perfection is not the same as accepting nothing less here and now. Scientific progress depends on such compromise — provided that potential caveats are recognized. [\n] If a model is the most technically and ethically feasible approach available, ...

 

Modelling as a discipline

  
International Journal of General Systems, Vol. 30, No. 3. (1 January 2001), pp. 261-282, https://doi.org/10.1080/03081070108960709

Abstract

Modelling is an essential and inseparable part of all scientific, and indeed all intellectual, activity. How then can we treat it as a separate discipline? The answer is that the professional modeller brings special skills and techniques to bear in order to produce results that are insightful, reliable, and useful. Many of these techniques can be taught formally, such as sophisticated statistical methods, computer simulation, systems identification, and sensitivity analysis. These are valuable tools, but they are not as important as ...

 

Harsh grades for ‘Europe’s MIT’

  

Abstract

[Excerpt] The European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) gets poor grades from the European Union’s financial watchdog. In a report released today, the European Court of Auditors said that EIT needs some fundamental changes if it is to fulfill its job of sparking innovation in Europe. [\n] EIT, officially launched in 2008, was the idea of former President of the European Commission José Manuel Barroso. He hoped that the European Union could create an institute that would help forge links between ...

 

Europe’s forest management did not mitigate climate warming

  
Science, Vol. 351, No. 6273. (2016), pp. 597-600, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aad7270

Abstract

[Europe's managed forests contribute to warming] For most of the past 250 years, surprisingly it seems that Europe's managed forests have been a net source of carbon, contributing to climate warming rather than mitigating it. Naudts et al. reconstructed the history of forest management in Europe in the context of a land-atmosphere model. The release of carbon otherwise stored in litter, dead wood, and soil carbon pools in managed forests was one key factor contributing to climate warming. Second, the conversion of ...

 

The unsung heroes of scientific software

  
Nature, Vol. 529, No. 7584. (4 January 2016), pp. 115-116, https://doi.org/10.1038/529115a

Abstract

Creators of computer programs that underpin experiments don’t always get their due — so the website Depsy is trying to track the impact of research code. [Excerpt] For researchers who code, academic norms for tracking the value of their work seem grossly unfair. They can spend hours contributing to software that underpins research, but if that work does not result in the authorship of a research paper and accompanying citations, there is little way to measure its impact. [\n] [...] Depsy’s creators hope that their ...

 

Are more complex physiological models of forest ecosystems better choices for plot and regional predictions?

  
Environmental Modelling & Software, Vol. 75 (January 2016), pp. 1-14, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2015.10.004

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We evaluated performance of process-based forest ecosystem models. [::] A complex physiological model performed best at the plot scale. [::] A hybrid empirical-physiological model performed best at the regional scale. [Abstract] We evaluated performance of process-based forest ecosystem models. A complex physiological model performed best at the plot scale. A hybrid empirical-physiological model performed best at the regional scale. Process-based forest ecosystem models vary from simple physiological, complex physiological, to hybrid empirical-physiological models. Previous studies indicate that complex models provide the best prediction at ...

 

Interactive comment (reply to Anonymous Referee 3) on Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility - by Bosco et al

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Discussions, Vol. 2 (2014), pp. C1786-C1795, https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1379902

Abstract

Throughout the public discussion of our article Bosco et al. (Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 2, 2639-2680, 2014), the Anonymous Referee 3 provided (Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 2, C1592-C1594, 2014) a variety of insights. This work presents our replies to them. ...

 

Interactive comment (reply to Dino Torri) on Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility - by Bosco et al

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Discussions, Vol. 2 (2014), pp. C671-C688, https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1379901

Abstract

During the public discussion of our article Bosco et al. (Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 2, 2639-2680, 2014), D. Torri provided numerous insights (Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss. 2, C528-C532, 2014). This work offers our replies to them. ...

 

Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, Vol. 15, No. 2. (4 February 2015), pp. 225-245, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-15-225-2015

Abstract

Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water-holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, the ...

 

Technical support

  
Nature, Vol. 517, No. 7536. (28 January 2015), pp. 528-528, https://doi.org/10.1038/517528a

Abstract

[Excerpt] Given that technical and support staff are such an important pillar of academic life, it is perhaps surprising that so little academic attention has been paid to their lot — and whether they are content with it. In 2011, researchers at King’s College London did publish a rare survey of skills and training in the United Kingdom, which raised a series of red flags (see go.nature.com/n74jsb). Technical staff are exposed on the front line when funding cuts bite: numbers working ...

 

Observational articles: a tool to reconstruct ecological history based on chronicling unusual events

  
F1000Research, Vol. 2 (9 August 2013), 168, https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.2-168.v1

Abstract

Natural history is based on observations, whereas modern ecology is mostly based on experiments aimed at testing hypotheses, either in the field or in a computer. Furthermore, experiments often reveal generalities that are taken as norms. Ecology, however, is a historical discipline and history is driven by both regularities (deriving from norms) and irregularities, or contingencies, which occur when norms are broken. If only norms occured, there would be no history. The current disregard for the importance of contingencies and anecdotes ...

 

Rqc2p and 60S ribosomal subunits mediate mRNA-independent elongation of nascent chains

  
Science, Vol. 347, No. 6217. (02 January 2015), pp. 75-78, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1259724

Abstract

[Edotor's summary: Tagging truncated proteins with CAT tails] During the translation of a messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein, ribosomes can sometimes stall. Truncated proteins thus formed can be toxic to the cell and must be destroyed. Shen et al. show that the proteins Ltn1p and Rqc2p, subunits of the ribosome quality control complex, bind to the stalled and partially disassembled ribosome. Ltn1p, a ubiquitin ligase, binds near the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel on the ribosome, well placed to tag the truncated protein ...

 

Competitive interactions between forest trees are driven by species' trait hierarchy, not phylogenetic or functional similarity: implications for forest community assembly

  
Ecology Letters, Vol. 15, No. 8. (August 2012), pp. 831-840, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01803.x

Abstract

The relative importance of competition vs. environmental filtering in the assembly of communities is commonly inferred from their functional and phylogenetic structure, on the grounds that similar species compete most strongly for resources and are therefore less likely to coexist locally. This approach ignores the possibility that competitive effects can be determined by relative positions of species on a hierarchy of competitive ability. Using growth data, we estimated 275 interaction coefficients between tree species in the French mountains. We show that ...

 

The influence of phylogenetic relatedness on species interactions among freshwater green algae in a mesocosm experiment

  
Journal of Ecology, Vol. 102, No. 5. (September 2014), pp. 1288-1299, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12271

Abstract

1. A long-standing hypothesis in ecology and evolutionary biology is that closely related species are more ecologically similar to each other and therefore compete more strongly than distant relatives do. A recent hypothesis posits that evolutionary relatedness may also explain the prevalence of mutualisms, with facilitative interactions being more common among distantly related species. Despite the importance of these hypotheses for understanding the structure and function of ecological communities, experimental tests to determine how evolutionary relatedness influences competition ...

 

Evolutionary history and the strength of species interactions: testing the phylogenetic limiting similarity hypothesis

  
Ecology, Vol. 95, No. 5. (May 2014), pp. 1407-1417, https://doi.org/10.1890/13-0986.1

Abstract

A longstanding concept in community ecology is that closely related species compete more strongly than distant relatives. Ecologists have invoked this “limiting similarity hypothesis” to explain patterns in the structure and function of biological communities and to inform conservation, restoration, and invasive-species management. However, few studies have empirically tested the validity of the limiting similarity hypothesis. Here we report the results of a laboratory microcosm experiment in which we used a model system of 23 common, co-occurring North American freshwater green ...

 

How to avoid a perfunctory sensitivity analysis

  
Environmental Modelling & Software, Vol. 25, No. 12. (15 December 2010), pp. 1508-1517, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2010.04.012

Abstract

Mathematical modelers from different disciplines and regulatory agencies worldwide agree on the importance of a careful sensitivity analysis (SA) of model-based inference. The most popular SA practice seen in the literature is that of ’one-factor-at-a-time’ (OAT). This consists of analyzing the effect of varying one model input factor at a time while keeping all other fixed. While the shortcomings of OAT are known from the statistical literature, its widespread use among modelers raises concern on the quality of the associated sensitivity ...

 

Ironies of automation

  
Automatica, Vol. 19, No. 6. (November 1983), pp. 775-779, https://doi.org/10.1016/0005-1098(83)90046-8

Abstract

This paper discusses the ways in which automation of industrial processes may expand rather than eliminate problems with the human operator. Some comments will be made on methods of alleviating these problems within the ‘classic’ approach of leaving the operator with responsibility for abnormal conditions, and on the potential for continued use of the human operator for on-line decision-making within human-computer collaboration. ...

 

Can we model the hydrological impacts of environmental change?

  
Hydrological Processes, Vol. 21, No. 23. (1 November 2007), pp. 3233-3236, https://doi.org/10.1002/hyp.6873

Abstract

Natural and anthropogenic changes constantly impact the environment surrounding us. Available moisture and energy change due to variability and shifts in climate, and the separation of precipitation into different pathways on the land surface are altered due to wildfires, beetle infestations, urbanization, deforestation, invasive plant species, etc. Many of these changes can have a significant impact on the hydrological regime of the watershed in which they occur (e.g. DeWalle et al., 2000; Porporato et al., 2004; Milly et al., 2005; Xu et al., 2005; Poff et al., 2006; Oki ...

 

Comparing and combining physically-based and empirically-based approaches for estimating the hydrology of ungauged catchments

  
Journal of Hydrology, Vol. 508 (January 2014), pp. 227-239, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2013.11.007

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Methods for estimating various hydrological indices at ungauged sites were compared. [::] Methods included a TopNet rainfall-runoff model and a Random Forest empirical model. [::] TopNet estimates were improved through correction using Random Forest estimates. [::] Random Forests provided the best estimates of all indices except mean flow. [::] Mean flow was best estimated using an already published empirical method. [Summary] Predictions of hydrological regimes at ungauged sites are required for various purposes such as setting environmental flows, assessing availability of water resources or ...

 

Comparison of empirical and theoretical remote sensing based bathymetry models in river environments

  
River Research and Applications, Vol. 28, No. 1. (January 2012), pp. 118-133, https://doi.org/10.1002/rra.1441

Abstract

Knowledge of underwater morphology is an essential component of many hydrological and environmental applications such as flood modelling and lotic habitat mapping. Remote sensing allows modelling of bathymetry at spatial scales that are impossible to achieve with traditional methods. However, the use of passive remote sensing for modelling water depth in fluvial environments remains a challenge. Different methods of computing bathymetry models based on remotely sensed imagery combined with ground measurements for calibration were investigated in order to produce a digital bathymetry ...

 

Further evidence for super-terminal raindrops

  
Geophysical Research Letters (August 2014), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.1002/2014gl061397

Abstract

A network of optical disdrometers (including laser precipitation monitors and a 2-dimensional video disdrometer) was utilized to determine whether the recent reports of “super-terminal” raindrops were spurious results of drop breakup occurring on instrumentation. Results unequivocally show that super-terminal raindrops at small (less than 1 mm) sizes are ubiquitous, are measurable over an extended area, and appear in every rain event investigated. No evidence was found to suggest that super-terminal drops are the result of drop breakup due to impact with the ...

 

Interactive comment on "Perturbation experiments to investigate the impact of ocean acidification: approaches and software tools" by J.-P. Gattuso and H. Lavigne

  
Biogeosciences Discussions, Vol. 6 (2009), pp. C1071-C1073

Abstract

[Excerpt] The referee wonders whether this manuscript should be published as a technical note rather than as a scientific article […][and] feels that the functions described are “black boxes”. We cannot disagree more with this statement as [the software tool] is free software, the source code of which is available to anyone (one just needs to download the package). Further, [the software tool] can be redistributed and/or modified under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the ...

 

Errors in systems approaches

  
International Journal of System of Systems Engineering, Vol. 3, No. 3/4. (2012), 233, https://doi.org/10.1504/ijsse.2012.052683

Abstract

Understanding and treating problems in complex systems, independent of the systems construct (i.e., socio–technical systems or socio–ecological systems), dictates the use of a formal systems approach. The systems approach may be methodological, a method, or a technique, but in each case it involves the imposition of order that ranges from the philosophical to the procedural. Independent of the philosophical construct or procedural rigour used in addressing the complex systems problem is the opportunity to commit a number of errors as part ...

 

A new approach to risk: the implications of E3

  
Risk Management, Vol. 11, No. 1. (February 2009), pp. 30-43, https://doi.org/10.1057/rm.2008.12

Abstract

The fundamental thesis of this paper is that no matter how much physical science and technology are involved in complex systems, no system is ever purely or solely physical or technical. Certainly no system of which we are aware is purely scientific or technical in its operation or management. Furthermore, while research on and the modeling of complex systems usually rely heavily on the consideration of technological variables and processes, they typically fail to consider the contributions of individual psychological, organizational ...

 

Computer science and parsimony: a reappraisal, with discussion of methods for poorly structured datasets

  
Cladistics (1 June 2014), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.1111/cla.12082

Abstract

In recent years, several publications in computer science journals have proposed new heuristic methods for parsimony analysis. This contribution discusses those papers, including methods highly praised by their authors, such as Hydra, Sampars and GA + PR + LS. Trees of comparable or better scores can be obtained using the program TNT, but from one to three orders of magnitude faster. In some cases, the search methods are very similar to others long in use in phylogenetics, but the enormous speed differences seem to correspond ...

 

Climate Outsider Finds Missing Global Warming

  
Science, Vol. 344, No. 6182. (25 April 2014), pp. 348-348, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.344.6182.348

Abstract

Major climate data sets have underestimated the rate of global warming in the last 15 years owing largely to poor data in the Arctic, the planet's fastest warming region. A dearth of temperature stations there is one culprit; another is a data-smoothing algorithm that has been improperly tuning down temperatures there. The findings come from an unlikely source: a crystallographer and graduate student working on the temperature analyses in their spare time. ...

 

Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

  
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Discussions, Vol. 2, No. 4. (11 April 2014), pp. 2639-2680, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhessd-2-2639-2014

Abstract

Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 4

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: banksia-serrata   bark-beetle   batocera-lineolata   bavaria   bedrock   beech-forest   behaviour   behavioural-contracts   belgium   beliefs   below-ground-biomass   berberis-vulgaris   bernoulli   bertholletia-excelsa   betula-alba   betula-albo-sinensis   betula-alleghaniensis   betula-alnoides   betula-ashburneri   betula-celtiberica   betula-chichibuensis   betula-chinensis   betula-cordifolia   betula-costata   betula-cylindrostachya   betula-dahurica   betula-ermanii   betula-falcata   betula-fruticosa   betula-glandulosa   betula-globispica   betula-gmelinii   betula-grossa   betula-gynoterminalis   betula-honanensis   betula-humilis   betula-karagandensis   betula-klokovii   betula-kotulae   betula-lenta   betula-maximowicziana   betula-megrelica   betula-michauxii   betula-microphylla   betula-murrayana   betula-nana   betula-nigra   betula-occidentalis   betula-papyrifera   betula-pendula   betula-platyphylla   betula-populifolia   betula-potamophila   betula-psammophila   betula-pubescens   betula-raddeana   betula-recurvata   betula-skvorsovii   betula-spp   betula-sunanensis   betula-szaferi   betula-utilis   betula-zinserlingii   betulaceae   bias   bias-correction   bias-disembodied-science-vs-computational-scholarship   bias-toward-primacy-of-theory-over-reality   bibliometrics   bifurcation-analysis   big-data   binomial-distribution   bio-based-economy   biochemical-product   bioclimatic-envelope-models   bioclimatic-predictors   biodiversity   biodiversity-hotspot   biodiversity-impacts   biodiversity-indicator   biodiversity-offsets   bioeconomy   bioenergy   bioethanol   biofilm   biofiltration   biofuel   biogenic-volatile-organic-compounds   biogeography   bioinformatics   biological-control   biological-invasions   biology   biomass   biomass-burning   biomass-production   biomass-to-energy   biome   biomonitoring   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

Pricing Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: The Never-Ending Story

  
BioScience, Vol. 50, No. 4. (2000), pp. 347-355, https://doi.org/10.1641/0006-3568(2000)050[0347:pbaest]2.3.co;2

Abstract

[Excerpt from the Conclusions] An impressive literature is available on environmental impact assessment and multiattribute analysis that documents the experience gained through 30 years of study and application. Nevertheless, these studies seem to be confined to the area of urban planning and are almost completely ignored by present-day economists as well as by many ecologists. Somewhere between the assignment of a zero value to biodiversity (the old-fashioned but still used practice, in which environmental impacts are viewed as externalities to be ...

 

Deep impact: unintended consequences of journal rank

  
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 7 (2013), https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00291

Abstract

Most researchers acknowledge an intrinsic hierarchy in the scholarly journals (“journal rank”) that they submit their work to, and adjust not only their submission but also their reading strategies accordingly. On the other hand, much has been written about the negative effects of institutionalizing journal rank as an impact measure. So far, contributions to the debate concerning the limitations of journal rank as a scientific impact assessment tool have either lacked data, or relied on only a few studies. In this ...

 

Dealing with Risk in Scientific Software Development

  
Software, IEEE In Software, IEEE, Vol. 25, No. 4. (24 July 2008), pp. 21-28, https://doi.org/10.1109/ms.2008.84

Abstract

The development of scientific software involves risk in the underlying theory, its implementation, and its use. Through a series of interviews, the authors explored how research scientists at two Canadian universities developed their software. These interviews indicated that the scientists used a set of strategies to address risk. They also suggested where the software engineering community could perform research focused on specific problems faced by scientific software developers. ...

 

Program verification and functioning of operative computing revisited: how about mathematics engineering?

  
Minds and Machines In Minds and Machines, Vol. 21, No. 2. (3 February 2011), pp. 337-359, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11023-011-9237-z

Abstract

The issue of proper functioning of operative computing and the utility of program verification, both in general and of specific methods, has been discussed a lot. In many of those discussions, attempts have been made to take mathematics as a model of knowledge and certitude achieving, and accordingly infer about the suitable ways to handle computing. I shortly review three approaches to the subject, and then take a stance by considering social factors which affect the epistemic status of both mathematics ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/bias-toward-primacy-of-theory-over-reality

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.