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Selection: with tag bias-disembodied-science-vs-computational-scholarship [14 articles] 

 

No place for bullies in science

  
Nature, Vol. 559, No. 7713. (10 July 2018), pp. 151-151, https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-05683-z

Abstract

High-profile allegations of bullying at a German research institute highlight the need for better systems to protect young scientists. [Excerpt] [...] In Nature’s opinion, young researchers there have been let down over the years. These researchers say the institute and its parent body, the Max Planck Society — also one of the world’s leading research organizations — failed to control the situation in a timely manner. It is hard to disagree. [\n] Most scientific institutions in Germany — including the Max Planck ...

 

Citations must default to the online publication date

  
Nature, Vol. 558, No. 7711. (27 June 2018), pp. 519-519, https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-05387-4

Abstract

[Excerpt] With online delivery increasingly dominating scientific publishing, most long-established journals run papers in both print and online formats — but not necessarily simultaneously. This can affect how researchers are given scientific priority. [...] In our experience, the time lag between the two can be as long as 6 months. This might be crucial for annual research evaluations, for instance, when a paper is published online at the end of one year and in print the year after [...] ...

 

AI could threaten pharmaceutical patents

  
Nature, Vol. 558, No. 7711. (26 June 2018), pp. 519-519, https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-05555-6

Abstract

[Excerpt] Artificial intelligence could help to identify more-effective candidate drugs [...] A patent is granted only when a compound’s application can be classified as both ‘new’ and ‘invented’. A highly effective compound thrown up by an AI algorithm could indeed be new. Whether it is ‘invented’, however, is debatable. This is because the inventor might be considered as either the algorithm (so not a person) or its programmer. [...] ...

 

To model or not to model, that is no longer the question for ecologists

  
Ecosystems, Vol. 20, No. 2. (2017), pp. 222-228, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-016-0068-x

Abstract

Here, I argue that we should abandon the division between “field ecologists” and “modelers,” and embrace modeling and empirical research as two powerful and often complementary approaches in the toolbox of 21st century ecologists, to be deployed alone or in combination depending on the task at hand. As empirical research has the longer tradition in ecology, and modeling is the more recent addition to the methodological arsenal, I provide both practical and theoretical reasons for integrating modeling more deeply into ecosystem ...

 

Europe’s Joint Research Centre, although improving, must think bigger

  
Nature, Vol. 550, No. 7674. (3 October 2017), pp. 8-8, https://doi.org/10.1038/550008a

Abstract

External report criticizes lack of exploratory research. [Excerpt] The European Union’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) uses the label EU Science Hub now. Whether the rebranding will increase its profile is one question. What science gets done inside this hub is another. In response to that query, there is some positive news. It is doing what it should be, and doing it well: collecting scientific and technical evidence in support of EU policies. That’s according to the report of an external evaluation released ...

 

Ten simple rules for making research software more robust

  
PLOS Computational Biology, Vol. 13, No. 4. (13 April 2017), e1005412, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005412

Abstract

[Abstract] Software produced for research, published and otherwise, suffers from a number of common problems that make it difficult or impossible to run outside the original institution or even off the primary developer’s computer. We present ten simple rules to make such software robust enough to be run by anyone, anywhere, and thereby delight your users and collaborators. [Author summary] Many researchers have found out the hard way that there’s a world of difference between “works for me on my machine” and “works for ...

 

Enhancing reproducibility for computational methods

  
Science, Vol. 354, No. 6317. (09 December 2016), pp. 1240-1241, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aah6168

Abstract

Over the past two decades, computational methods have radically changed the ability of researchers from all areas of scholarship to process and analyze data and to simulate complex systems. But with these advances come challenges that are contributing to broader concerns over irreproducibility in the scholarly literature, among them the lack of transparency in disclosure of computational methods. Current reporting methods are often uneven, incomplete, and still evolving. We present a novel set of Reproducibility Enhancement Principles (REP) targeting disclosure challenges ...

 

Research software sustainability: report on a knowledge exchange workshop

  
(February 2016)

Abstract

[Excerpt: Executive summary] Without software, modern research would not be possible. Understandably, people tend to marvel at results rather than the tools used in their discovery, which means the fundamental role of software in research has been largely overlooked. But whether it is widely recognised or not, research is inexorably connected to the software that is used to generate results, and if we continue to overlook software we put at risk the reliability and reproducibility of the research itself. [\n] The adoption of software is accompanied by new risks - many of ...

 

It's impossible to conduct research without software, say 7 out of 10 UK researchers

  
Software and research, Vol. 5 (2014), 1536

Abstract

No one knows how much software is used in research. Look around any lab and you’ll see software – both standard and bespoke – being used by all disciplines and seniorities of researchers. Software is clearly fundamental to research, but we can’t prove this without evidence. And this lack of evidence is the reason why we ran a survey of researchers at 15 Russell Group universities to find out about their software use and background. [Excerpt: Headline figures] [::] 92% of academics use ...

 

Trusting others to ‘do the math’

  
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol. 40, No. 4. (2 October 2015), pp. 376-392, https://doi.org/10.1080/03080188.2016.1165454

Abstract

Researchers effectively trust the work of others anytime they use software tools or custom software. In this article I explore this notion of trusting others, using Digital Humanities as a focus, and drawing on my own experience. Software is inherently flawed and limited, so when its use in scholarship demands better practices and terminology, to review research software and describe development processes. It is also important to make research software engineers and their work more visible, both for the purposes of ...

 

Software and scholarship

  
Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol. 40, No. 4. (2 October 2015), pp. 342-348, https://doi.org/10.1080/03080188.2016.1165456

Abstract

[excerpt] The thematic focus of this issue is to examine what happens where software and scholarship meet, with particular reference to digital work in the humanities. Despite the some seven decades of its existence, Digital Humanities continues to struggle with the implications, in the academic ecosystem, of its position between engineering and art. [...] [\n] [...] [\n] I will end with my own reflection on this topic of evaluation. Peer review of scholarly works of software continues to pose a particularly vexed challenge ...

 

Programmers, professors, and parasites: credit and co-authorship in computer science

  
Science and Engineering Ethics In Science and Engineering Ethics, Vol. 15, No. 4. (2009), pp. 467-489, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11948-009-9119-4

Abstract

This article presents an in-depth analysis of past and present publishing practices in academic computer science to suggest the establishment of a more consistent publishing standard. Historical precedent for academic publishing in computer science is established through the study of anecdotes as well as statistics collected from databases of published computer science papers. After examining these facts alongside information about analogous publishing situations and standards in other scientific fields, the article concludes with a list of basic principles that should be ...

 

Interactive comment on "Perturbation experiments to investigate the impact of ocean acidification: approaches and software tools" by J.-P. Gattuso and H. Lavigne

  
Biogeosciences Discussions, Vol. 6 (2009), pp. C1071-C1073

Abstract

[Excerpt] The referee wonders whether this manuscript should be published as a technical note rather than as a scientific article […][and] feels that the functions described are “black boxes”. We cannot disagree more with this statement as [the software tool] is free software, the source code of which is available to anyone (one just needs to download the package). Further, [the software tool] can be redistributed and/or modified under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 5

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: betula-populifolia   betula-potamophila   betula-psammophila   betula-pubescens   betula-raddeana   betula-recurvata   betula-skvorsovii   betula-spp   betula-sunanensis   betula-szaferi   betula-utilis   betula-zinserlingii   betulaceae   bias   bias-correction   bias-disembodied-science-vs-computational-scholarship   bias-toward-primacy-of-theory-over-reality   bibliometrics   bifurcation-analysis   big-data   binomial-distribution   bio-based-economy   biochemical-product   bioclimatic-envelope-models   bioclimatic-predictors   biocontrol-agents   biodiversity   biodiversity-hotspot   biodiversity-impacts   biodiversity-indicator   biodiversity-offsets   bioeconomy   bioenergy   bioethanol   biofilm   biofiltration   biofuel   biogenic-volatile-organic-compounds   biogeography   bioinformatics   biological-control   biological-invasions   biology   biomass   biomass-burning   biomass-production   biomass-to-energy   biome   biomonitoring   bioscience   biosecurity   biotechnology   biotic-effects   biotic-factors   biotic-homogenization   biotic-interactions   birches   bird-conservation   bird-dispersal   bird-pollination   birds   biscogniauxia-atropunctata   biscogniauxia-mediterranea   biscogniauxia-nummularia   bismarckia-nobilis   bison-bonasus   bixa-orellana   black-aphid   black-carbon   black-pine   black-poplar   black-sea-region   blechnum-spicant   blitz   blue-tits   blue-water   bogs   boiss   bombacopsis-quinata   bombax-malabaricum   bone-attachment   boolean-expressions   bootstrap   bootstrapping   borassus-flabellifer   borch-forest   border-effect   boreal-continental-forest   boreal-forest   boreal-forests   boreal-mountain-system   bosnia-herzegovina   boswellia-sacra   botanical-macro-remains   botany   botryosphaeria-spp   bottom-up   brachylaena-huillensis   brachylaena-rotundata   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/bias-disembodied-science-vs-computational-scholarship

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.