From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Selection: with tag anthropic-feedback [25 articles] 

 

Thinking of wildfire as a natural hazard

  
Society & Natural Resources, Vol. 17, No. 6. (1 July 2004), pp. 509-516, https://doi.org/10.1080/08941920490452445

Abstract

Natural hazards theory with its emphasis on understanding the human–hazard interaction has much to offer in better understanding how individuals respond to the wildfire hazard. Ironically, very few natural hazards studies have actually looked at wildfires, despite the insights the field might offer. This report is structured around four interrelated questions that are often heard from individuals involved with wildfire management. Examining these four items through the natural hazards lens can demonstrate just a few of the ways the field can ...

 

Emission budgets and pathways consistent with limiting warming to 1.5[thinsp][deg]C

  
Nature Geoscience, Vol. advance online publication (18 September 2017), https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo3031

Abstract

The Paris Agreement has opened debate on whether limiting warming to 1.5 °C is compatible with current emission pledges and warming of about 0.9 °C from the mid-nineteenth century to the present decade. We show that limiting cumulative post-2015 CO2 emissions to about 200 GtC would limit post-2015 warming to less than 0.6 °C in 66% of Earth system model members of the CMIP5 ensemble with no mitigation of other climate drivers, increasing to 240 GtC with ambitious non-CO2 mitigation. We combine a simple climate–carbon-cycle model ...

 

Limiting global warming to 1.5 °C may still be possible

  
Nature (18 September 2017), https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2017.22627

Abstract

Analysis suggests that researchers have underestimated how much carbon humanity can emit before reaching this level of warming. [Excerpt] A team of climate scientists has delivered a rare bit of good news: it could be easier than previously thought to limit global warming to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, as called for in the 2015 Paris climate agreement. But even if the team is right — and some researchers are already questioning the conclusions — heroic efforts to curb greenhouse-gas emissions will ...

 

Human influence on California fire regimes

  
Ecological Applications, Vol. 17, No. 5. (July 2007), pp. 1388-1402, https://doi.org/10.1890/06-1128.1

Abstract

Periodic wildfire maintains the integrity and species composition of many ecosystems, including the mediterranean-climate shrublands of California. However, human activities alter natural fire regimes, which can lead to cascading ecological effects. Increased human ignitions at the wildland–urban interface (WUI) have recently gained attention, but fire activity and risk are typically estimated using only biophysical variables. Our goal was to determine how humans influence fire in California and to examine whether this influence was linear, by relating contemporary (2000) and historic (1960–2000) ...

 

Integrating social science research into wildland fire management

  
Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4. (29 July 2014), pp. 381-394, https://doi.org/10.1108/dpm-10-2013-0193

Abstract

Purpose – Social science research is used to support the formulation of natural resource management decisions with accurate and timely information. Due to risk and potential impacts, this is important in wildland fire management. The purpose of this paper is to identify the respondent perceptions of a natural disturbance agent's impact on fire management in Colorado and Wyoming. Design/methodology/approach – The research methodology included a self-administered questionnaire completed by a random sample of respondents in three study locations adjacent to national forests. A quantitative ...

 

Fire effects on soils: the human dimension

  
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 1696. (05 June 2016), 20150171, https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0171

Abstract

Soils are among the most valuable non-renewable resources on the Earth. They support natural vegetation and human agro-ecosystems, represent the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock, and act as stores and filters for water. Mankind has impacted on soils from its early days in many different ways, with burning being the first human perturbation at landscape scales. Fire has long been used as a tool to fertilize soils and control plant growth, but it can also substantially change vegetation, enhance soil erosion ...

 

Modeling temporal changes in human-caused wildfires in Mediterranean Europe based on Land Use-Land Cover interfaces

  
Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 378 (October 2016), pp. 68-78, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.020

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] LULC interfaces between forest and other land uses modeled human-caused wildfire. [::] Euro Mediterranean Europe was analyzed in two time periods, 1990s and 2000s. [::] Models positive related interface density to an increase in fire density. [::] At country-level analysis did not revealed significant differences in the models. [::] A ten year period can be scarce to detect significant LULC changes linked to fire. [Abstract] In the period 1980s–2010s, 95% of wildfires in Mediterranean Europe were due to human causes. In this highly populated region, socio-economic ...

 

Global and regional analysis of climate and human drivers of wildfire

  
Science of The Total Environment, Vol. 409, No. 18. (August 2011), pp. 3472-3481, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.05.032

Abstract

Identifying and quantifying the statistical relationships between climate and anthropogenic drivers of fire is important for global biophysical modelling of wildfire and other Earth system processes. This study used regression tree and random forest analysis on global data for various climatic and human variables to establish their relative importance. The main interactions found at the global scale also apply regionally: greatest wildfire burned area is associated with high temperature (> 28 °C), intermediate annual rainfall (350–1100 mm), and prolonged dry periods (which varies by ...

 

Anthropogenic effects on global mean fire size

  
International Journal of Wildland Fire, Vol. 24, No. 5. (2015), 589, https://doi.org/10.1071/wf14208

Abstract

Wildland fires are an important agent in the earth’s system. Multiple efforts are currently in progress to better represent wildland fires in earth system models. Although wildland fires are a natural disturbance factor, humans have an important effect on fire occurrence by directly igniting and suppressing fires and indirectly influencing fire behaviour by changing land cover and landscape structure. Although these factors are recognised, their quantitative effect on fire growth and burned area are not well understood and therefore only partly ...

 

An Anthropocene map of genetic diversity

  
Science, Vol. 353, No. 6307. (29 September 2016), pp. 1532-1535, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf4381

Abstract

The Anthropocene is witnessing a loss of biodiversity, with well-documented declines in the diversity of ecosystems and species. For intraspecific genetic diversity, however, we lack even basic knowledge on its global distribution. We georeferenced 92,801 mitochondrial sequences for >4500 species of terrestrial mammals and amphibians, and found that genetic diversity is 27% higher in the tropics than in nontropical regions. Overall, habitats that are more affected by humans hold less genetic diversity than wilder regions, although results for mammals are sensitive ...

 

The maximum climate ambition needs a firm research backing

  
Nature, Vol. 537, No. 7622. (28 September 2016), pp. 585-586, https://doi.org/10.1038/537585b

Abstract

We need to know what the 1.5 °C warming target will involve — even if we don’t reach it. [Excerpt] [...] The 2015 Paris climate agreement commits governments to keeping average global surface temperatures to between 1.5 °C and 2 °C above the preindustrial level. But warming has already passed the 1-degree mark, and some estimates suggest that even if current commitments are fully implemented, they would allow temperatures to rise nearly 3 °C. If the 2-degree goal seems implausible, given current politics, 1.5 °C is ...

 

Spatiotemporal patterns of changes in fire regime and climate: defining the pyroclimates of south-eastern France (Mediterranean Basin)

  
Climatic Change, Vol. 129, No. 1-2. (2015), pp. 239-251, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-015-1332-3

Abstract

The impacts of climate change on fires are expected to be highly variable spatially and temporally. In heavily anthropized landscapes, the great number of factors affecting fire regimes further limits our ability to predict future fire activity caused by climate. To address this, we develop a new framework for analysing regional changes in fire regimes from specific spatiotemporal patterns of fires and climate, so-called pyroclimates. We aim to test the trends of fire activity and climate (1973–2009) across the Mediterranean and ...

 

A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2016

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 31, No. 1. (January 2016), pp. 44-53, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.11.007

Abstract

This paper presents the results of our seventh annual horizon scan, in which we aimed to identify issues that could have substantial effects on global biological diversity in the future, but are not currently widely well known or understood within the conservation community. Fifteen issues were identified by a team that included researchers, practitioners, professional horizon scanners, and journalists. The topics include use of managed bees as transporters of biological control agents, artificial superintelligence, electric pulse trawling, testosterone in the aquatic ...

 

Armed-conflict risks enhanced by climate-related disasters in ethnically fractionalized countries

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, No. 33. (16 August 2016), pp. 9216-9221, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1601611113

Abstract

[Significance] Ethnic divides play a major role in many armed conflicts around the world and might serve as predetermined conflict lines following rapidly emerging societal tensions arising from disruptive events like natural disasters. We find evidence in global datasets that risk of armed-conflict outbreak is enhanced by climate-related disaster occurrence in ethnically fractionalized countries. Although we find no indications that environmental disasters directly trigger armed conflicts, our results imply that disasters might act as a threat multiplier in several of the world’s ...

 

Define the Anthropocene in terms of the whole Earth

  
Nature, Vol. 536, No. 7616. (17 August 2016), pp. 251-251, https://doi.org/10.1038/536251a

Abstract

Researchers must consider human impacts on entire Earth systems and not get trapped in discipline-specific definitions, says Clive Hamilton. [Excerpt] The Anthropocene was conceived by Earth-system scientists to capture the very recent rupture in Earth’s history arising from the impact of human activity on the Earth system as a whole. Read that again. Take special note of the phrases ‘very recent rupture’ and ‘the Earth system as a whole’. Understanding the Anthropocene, and what humanity now confronts, depends on a firm grasp of ...

 

Wolf diet in an agricultural landscape of north-eastern Turkey

  
Mammalia, Vol. 80, No. 3. (1 January 2016), https://doi.org/10.1515/mammalia-2014-0151

Abstract

In this study, we investigated wolf feeding ecology in Kars province, north-eastern Turkey, by analysing 72 scat samples collected in spring 2013. Ongoing camera trap surveys suggest that large wild ungulates are exceptionally rare in the region. On the contrary, livestock is abundant. Accordingly, scats analysis revealed that livestock constituted most of the biomass intake for wolves, although small mammals were the most frequent prey items. Wild ungulates were occasional prey, and although wolves make use of the main village garbage ...

 

Structural factors driving boreal forest albedo in Finland

  
Remote Sensing of Environment, Vol. 175 (March 2016), pp. 43-51, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2015.12.035

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Analyzed factors driving fine spatial resolution changes in boreal forest albedo. [::] Based on field plot measurements, ALS data and albedos from Landsat-5 TM data. [::] Tree species, forest structure and understory affected albedo. [::] The dependency of albedo on forest structural variables was species-specific. [::] At high volumes albedo saturated and was mainly governed by tree species. [Abstract] Understanding the influence of forest structure on forest albedo, and thus on the energy exchange between the forest and the atmosphere, is urgently needed in areas with ...

 

Relationship between forest density and albedo in the boreal zone

  
Ecological Modelling, Vol. 261-262 (July 2013), pp. 74-79, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2013.04.009

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] We simulated albedo of boreal zone forests using a radiative transfer model. [::] Species composition had a strong impact on forest albedo. [::] Diurnal courses of albedo were related to forest density. [::] The albedos decreased with increasing stand biomass, LAI, and canopy cover. [Abstract] The relationship between albedo and forest areas is complex. Little is known about the driving factors of albedo in the boreal zone. Using a radiative transfer model and an extensive forest inventory database, we simulated albedo of forest stands composed ...

 

Forest summer albedo is sensitive to species and thinning: how should we account for this in Earth system models?

  
Biogeosciences, Vol. 11, No. 8. (29 April 2014), pp. 2411-2427, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-11-2411-2014

Abstract

Although forest management is one of the instruments proposed to mitigate climate change, the relationship between forest management and canopy albedo has been ignored so far by climate models. Here we develop an approach that could be implemented in Earth system models. A stand-level forest gap model is combined with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning on summertime canopy albedo. This approach reveals which parameter has the largest affect on summer ...

 

Europe’s forest management did not mitigate climate warming

  
Science, Vol. 351, No. 6273. (2016), pp. 597-600, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aad7270

Abstract

[Europe's managed forests contribute to warming] For most of the past 250 years, surprisingly it seems that Europe's managed forests have been a net source of carbon, contributing to climate warming rather than mitigating it. Naudts et al. reconstructed the history of forest management in Europe in the context of a land-atmosphere model. The release of carbon otherwise stored in litter, dead wood, and soil carbon pools in managed forests was one key factor contributing to climate warming. Second, the conversion of ...

 

Anthropocene: the human age

  
Nature, Vol. 519, No. 7542. (11 March 2015), pp. 144-147, https://doi.org/10.1038/519144a

Abstract

Momentum is building to establish a new geological epoch that recognizes humanity's impact on the planet. But there is fierce debate behind the scenes. [Excerpt] [...] Through mining activities alone, humans move more sediment than all the world's rivers combined. Homo sapiens has also warmed the planet, raised sea levels, eroded the ozone layer and acidified the oceans. [\n] Given the magnitude of these changes, many researchers propose that the Anthropocene represents a new division of geological time. The concept has gained traction, ...

References

  1. Walker, M., Johnsen, S., Rasmussen, S. O., Popp, T., Steffensen, J.-P., Gibbard, P., Hoek, W., Lowe, J., Andrews, J., Björck, S., Cwynar, L. C., Hughen, K., Kershaw, P., Kromer, B., Litt, T., Lowe, D. J., Nakagawa, T., Newnham, R., Schwander, J., 2009. Formal definition and dating of the GSSP (global stratotype section and point) for the base of the holocene using the greenland NGRIP ice core, and selected auxiliary records. Journal of Quaternary Science 24 (1), 3-17.
 

Mediterranean cork oak savannas require human use to sustain biodiversity and ecosystem services

  
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Vol. 9, No. 5. (10 June 2011), pp. 278-286, https://doi.org/10.1890/100084

Abstract

Mediterranean cork oak savannas, which are found only in southwestern Europe and northwestern Africa, are ecosystems of high socioeconomic and conservation value. Characterized by sparse tree cover and a diversity of understory vegetation – ranging from shrub formations to grasslands – that support high levels of biodiversity, these ecosystems require active management and use by humans to ensure their continued existence. The most important product of these savannas is cork, a non-timber forest product that is periodically harvested without requiring tree ...

 

Earth systems: Model human adaptation to climate change

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7515. (27 August 2014), pp. 365-366, https://doi.org/10.1038/512365a

Abstract

[Excerpt] We can no longer ignore feedbacks between global warming and how people respond, say Paul I. Palmer and Matthew J. Smith. Current models of Earth's climate capture physical and biophysical processes. But the planet has entered a new state: humans are adapting to, as well as causing, environmental changes. This major feedback must be modelled. Projections of the future climate based on simple economic narratives1 — from cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions to unmitigated growth — are unrealistic. Faced with droughts ...

 

People power

  
Nature, Vol. 512, No. 7515. (27 August 2014), pp. 347-347, https://doi.org/10.1038/512347b

Abstract

[Excerpt] Climate models must consider how humans are responding to a warming world. Physics and mathematics can tell us how the Universe began, but as the cosmologist Stephen Hawking noted: “They are not much use in predicting human behaviour because there are far too many equations to solve.” The motives, needs and desires that drive human action have long resisted rational analysis. From the volatility of the stock market to fads and fashions that flare brightly and then vanish, the ability ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 2

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: agroecosystems   agroforestry   ailanthone   ailanthus-altissima   ailanthus-glandulosa   ailanthus-spp   air-pollution   air-quality   alaska   albania   albedo   albizia-guachapele   albizia-julibrissin   albizia-lebbek   alcoholic-beverage   alder-decline   aleurites-fordii   aleurites-moluccana   algarve   algebra   algorithm-engineering   algorithm-errors   algorithmics   algorithms   alien-species   allelochemicals   allelopathy   allergen   allergy   allozymes   alnus-cordata   alnus-cremastogyne   alnus-crispa   alnus-glutinosa   alnus-hirsuta   alnus-incana   alnus-nepalensis   alnus-rhombifolia   alnus-rubra   alnus-spp   alnus-viridis   aloe-dichotoma   alpine-environment   alpine-region   alsophila-pometaria   altica-populi   altitudinal-gradient   aluminium   amaranthus-spp   amazonia   ambiguity   amblypelta-cocophaga   ambrosiella-spp   amelanchier-laevis   amelanchier-ovalis   amelanchier-spp   amelancier-ovalis   amorpha-fruticosa   amsterdam   anacardium-occidentale   anaerea-calcarata   anaerea-carcharias   analogic-thinking   analysis   ancient-forest   ancient-forest-plant-species   ande-region   andira-inermis   animal   animal-feed   anisogramma-anomala   anisotrpy   annona-cherimola   annual-precipitation   anomaly-detection   anoplophora-glabripennis   anoplophora-horsfieldi   anoxia   ansi   ant-colony-optimization   antarctic-region   antarctic-sea-ice   anthropic-feedback   anthropocene   anthropogenic-changes   anthropogenic-impacts   anthropogenic-unsustainable-species-distribution   anti-inflammatory   anti-nociceptive   antiaris-toxicaria   antifeedant-activity   antifungal-compounds   antifungal-properties   antimycobacterial-terpenoids   antioxidative-potential   antipattern   apache2-0   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/anthropic-feedback

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.