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Selection: with tag abiotic-factors [17 articles] 

 

Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 178, No. 4. (1 June 2008), pp. 719-739, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02436.x

Abstract

Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced ...

 

Climate-driven tree mortality: insights from the piñon pine die-off in the United States

  
New Phytologist, Vol. 200, No. 2. (October 2013), pp. 301-303, https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.12464

Abstract

The global climate is changing, and a range of negative effects on plants has already been observed and will likely continue into the future. One of the most apparent consequences of climate change is widespread tree mortality (Fig. 1). Extensive tree die-offs resulting from recent climate change have been documented across a range of forest types on all forested continents (Allen et al., 2010). The exact physiological mechanisms causing this mortality are not yet well understood (e.g. McDowell, 2011), but they ...

 

Habitat, environment and niche: what are we modelling?

  
Oikos, Vol. 115, No. 1. (October 2006), pp. 186-191, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2006.0030-1299.14908.x

Abstract

The terms 'habitat', 'environment' and 'niche' are used inconsistently, and with some confusion, within the ecological literature on species distribution and abundance modelling. Here I suggest interrelated working definitions of these terms whereby the concept of habitat remains associated with descriptive/correlative analyses of the environments of organisms, while the niche concept is reserved for mechanistic analyses. To model the niche mechanistically, it is necessary to understand the way an organism's morphology, physiology, and especially behaviour, determine the kinds of environment it ...

 

Seven shortfalls that beset large-scale knowledge of biodiversity

  
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Vol. 46, No. 1. (2015), pp. 523-549, https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054400

Abstract

Ecologists and evolutionary biologists are increasingly using big-data approaches to tackle questions at large spatial, taxonomic, and temporal scales. However, despite recent efforts to gather two centuries of biodiversity inventories into comprehensive databases, many crucial research questions remain unanswered. Here, we update the concept of knowledge shortfalls and review the tradeoffs between generality and uncertainty. We present seven key shortfalls of current biodiversity data. Four previously proposed shortfalls pinpoint knowledge gaps for species taxonomy (Linnean), distribution (Wallacean), abundance (Prestonian), and evolutionary ...

 

Physical and biological feedbacks of deforestation

  
Reviews of Geophysics, Vol. 50, No. 4. (14 December 2012), https://doi.org/10.1029/2012rg000394

Abstract

Forest vegetation can interact with its surrounding environment in ways that enhance conditions favorable for its own existence. Removal of forest vegetation has been shown to alter these conditions in a number of ways, thereby inhibiting the reestablishment of the same community of woody plants. The effect of vegetation on an environmental variable along with vegetation susceptibility to the associated environmental conditions may imply a positive feedback: Changes in the internal conditions controlling this variable such as deforestation could inhibit the ...

 

On underestimation of global vulnerability to tree mortality and forest die-off from hotter drought in the Anthropocene

  
Ecosphere, Vol. 6, No. 8. (August 2015), art129, https://doi.org/10.1890/es15-00203.1

Abstract

Patterns, mechanisms, projections, and consequences of tree mortality and associated broad-scale forest die-off due to drought accompanied by warmer temperatures—“hotter drought”, an emerging characteristic of the Anthropocene—are the focus of rapidly expanding literature. Despite recent observational, experimental, and modeling studies suggesting increased vulnerability of trees to hotter drought and associated pests and pathogens, substantial debate remains among research, management and policy-making communities regarding future tree mortality risks. We summarize key mortality-relevant findings, differentiating between those implying lesser versus greater levels of ...

 

Biotic and abiotic factors affecting the dying back of pedunculate oak Quercus robur L.

  
Forestry, Vol. 70, No. 4. (01 January 1997), pp. 399-406, https://doi.org/10.1093/forestry/70.4.399

Abstract

Episodes of dying back of pedunculate oak Quercus roburhave occurred in Europe. In this article, produced to mark the 70th volume of Forestry, the 1920s episode, as described by contemporary research workers, is evaluated. The second part of the paper is concerned with an accountof the 1989–1994 episode in Great Britain and comparisons are made with occurrences elsewhere in Europe. In Britain, one feature not previously recorded, was attack on declining trees by the buprestid beetle, Agrilus pannonicus. ...

 

Individual vulnerability factors of Silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) to parasitism by two contrasting biotic agents: mistletoe (Viscum album L. ssp. abietis) and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) during a decline process

  
Annals of Forest Science In Annals of Forest Science, Vol. 71, No. 6. (2014), pp. 659-673, https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-012-0251-y

Abstract

[Context] In recent decades, there have been increasing reports of forest decline, especially in Mediterranean forest ecosystems. Decline in tree vitality is usually due to complex interactions between abiotic factors and biotic agents that attack weakened trees. [Aims and methods] Estimating dendrometrical characteristics [basal area increment (BAI), age at DBH from tree ring counting, social status, height, and diameter], tree health status, and a competition index, we investigated the individual vulnerability of a French declining silver fir forest to both mistletoe (Viscum album L. ...

 

Ecogeography and rural management : a contribution to the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme

  
(1992)

Abstract

Part 1 of this book reviews several different approaches to the study of the natural environment. It includes chapters on; land surveys; geomorphology; pedology; cartography; hydrology and remote sensing. Part 2 of the book has 3 chapters on the practical application of integrated land management. ...

 

Seed dispersal distances: a typology based on dispersal modes and plant traits

  
Botanica Helvetica In Botanica Helvetica, Vol. 117, No. 2. (7 December 2007), pp. 109-124, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00035-007-0797-8

Abstract

The ability of plants to disperse seeds may be critical for their survival under the current constraints of landscape fragmentation and climate change. Seed dispersal distance would therefore be an important variable to include in species distribution models. Unfortunately, data on dispersal distances are scarce, and seed dispersal models only exist for some species with particular dispersal modes. To overcome this lack of knowledge, we propose a simple approach to estimate seed dispersal distances for a whole regional flora. We reviewed ...

 

The roles of dispersal, fecundity, and predation in the population persistence of an oak (Quercus engelmannii) under global change

  
PLoS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 5. (18 May 2012), e36391, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0036391

Abstract

A species’ response to climate change depends on the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors that define future habitat suitability and species’ ability to migrate or adapt. The interactive effects of processes such as fire, dispersal, and predation have not been thoroughly addressed in the climate change literature. Our objective was to examine how life history traits, short-term global change perturbations, and long-term climate change interact to affect the likely persistence of an oak species - Quercus engelmannii (Engelmann oak). Specifically, ...

 

Abiotic and biotic factors and their interactions as causes of oak decline in Central Europe

  
Forest Pathology, Vol. 32, No. 4-5. (August 2002), pp. 277-307, https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1439-0329.2002.00291.x

Abstract

Incidences of oak decline have occurred repeatedly during the past three centuries as well as in the most recent decades. On the basis of historical records and dendrochronological measurements, oak decline in Central Europe has been attributed to the single or combined effects of climatic extremes (winter frost, summer drought), defoliating insects, and pathogenic fungi. Starting from a literature review, we discuss the possible roles of various abiotic (air pollution, nitrogen eutrophication, soil chemical stress, climatic extremes, site conditions) and biotic ...

 

(INRMM-MiD internal record) List of keywords of the INRMM meta-information database - part 1

  
(February 2014)
Keywords: 10th-percentile-training-presence   80-20-principle   abies-alba   abies-balsamea   abies-borisii-regis   abies-bornmulleriana   abies-cephalonica   abies-cilicica   abies-concolor   abies-equi-trojani   abies-firma   abies-grandis   abies-holophylla   abies-lasiocarpa   abies-magnifica   abies-marocana   abies-nebrodensis   abies-nephrolepis   abies-nordmanniana   abies-numidica   abies-pinsapo   abies-procera   abies-sachalinensis   abies-sibirica   abies-spp   abiotic-factors   above-ground-biomass   abrupt-changes   acacia-auriculiformis   acacia-dealbata   acacia-erioloba   acacia-farnesiana   acacia-koa   acacia-saligna   acacia-seyal   acacia-spp   acacia-tortilis   acacia-xanthophloea   acalitus-rudis   accessibility   accuracy   accuracy-vs-precision   acer-campestre   acer-circinatum   acer-heldreichii   acer-lobelii   acer-macrophyllum   acer-mono   acer-monspessulanum   acer-negundo   acer-opalus   acer-peronai   acer-platanoides   acer-pseudoplatanous   acer-pseudoplatanus   acer-pseudosieboldianum   acer-rubrum   acer-saccharum   acer-sempervirens   acer-spp   acer-tataricum   aceraceous   aceria-parapopuli   acid-deposition   acm   acorns   acrocomia-aculeata   acute-oak-decline   adansonia-digitata   adaptation   adaptive-control   adaptive-response   adda-lake   adenium-obesum   adonidia-merrillii   adventitious-root   aerosol   aesculus-californica   aesculus-hippocastanum   aesculus-spp   aesthetic-value   afforestation   africa   agave-spp   age   age-distribution   aggregated-indices   agile-programming   agricultural-abandonment   agricultural-land   agricultural-policy   agricultural-resources   agriculture   agrilus-anxius   agrilus-biguttatus   agrilus-pannonicus   agrilus-planipennis   agrilus-spp   agrochemistry   inrmm-list-of-tags  

Abstract

List of indexed keywords within the transdisciplinary set of domains which relate to the Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management (INRMM). In particular, the list of keywords maps the semantic tags in the INRMM Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD). [\n] The INRMM-MiD records providing this list are accessible by the special tag: inrmm-list-of-tags ( http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/inrmm-list-of-tags ). ...

 

On the dynamics of soil moisture, vegetation, and erosion: implications of climate variability and change

  
Water Resources Research, Vol. 42, No. 6. (21 June 2006), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005wr004113

Abstract

We couple a shear-stress-dependent fluvial erosion and sediment transport rule with stochastic models of ecohydrological soil moisture and vegetation dynamics. Rainfall is simulated by the Poisson rectangular pulses rainfall model with three parameters: mean rainfall ...

 

Soil biotic legacy effects of extreme weather events influence plant invasiveness

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, No. 24. (11 June 2013), pp. 9835-9838, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1300922110

Abstract

Climate change is expected to increase future abiotic stresses on ecosystems through extreme weather events leading to more extreme drought and rainfall incidences [Jentsch A, et al. (2007) Front Ecol Environ 5(7):365–374]. These fluctuations in precipitation may affect soil biota, soil processes [Evans ST, Wallenstein MD (2012) Biogeochemistry 109:101–116], and the proportion of exotics in invaded plant communities [Jiménez MA, et al. (2011) Ecol Lett 14:1277–1235]. However, little is known about legacy effects in soil on the performance of exotics and ...

 

Differential light responses of Mediterranean tree saplings: linking ecophysiology with regeneration niche in four co-occurring species

  
Tree Physiology, Vol. 26, No. 7. (01 July 2006), pp. 947-958, https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/26.7.947

Abstract

The ecophysiological mechanisms underlying plant–plant interactions and forest regeneration processes in Mediterranean ecosystems are poorly understood, and the experimental evidence for the role of light availability in these processes is particularly scant. We analyzed the effects of high and low irradiances on 31 ecological, morphological and physiological variables in saplings of four late-successional Mediterranean trees, two deciduous (Acer opalus subsp. granatense (Boiss.) Font Quer & Rothm. and Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) and two evergreen (Pinus nigra Arnold subsp. salzmannii (Dunal) Franco and ...

 

Response of tree seedlings to the abiotic heterogeneity generated by nurse shrubs: an experimental approach at different scales

  
Ecography, Vol. 28, No. 6. (December 2005), pp. 757-768, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2005.0906-7590.04337.x

Abstract

Spatial heterogeneity of abiotic factors influences patterns of seedling establishment at different scales. In stress-prone ecosystems such as Mediterranean ones, heterogeneity generated by shrubs has been shown to facilitate the establishment of tree species. However, how this facilitation is affected by spatial scale remains poorly understood. We have experimentally analysed the consequences of the abiotic heterogeneity generated by pioneer shrubs on survival, growth and physiology of seedlings of three important tree species from Mediterranean mountains (Acer opalus ssp. granatense, Quercus pyrenaica ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/tag/abiotic-factors

Publication metadata

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Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
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Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.