From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Selection: Turner:MG [6 articles] 

Publications by author Turner:MG.
 

Adapt to more wildfire in western North American forests as climate changes

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 18. (02 May 2017), pp. 4582-4590, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1617464114

Abstract

Wildfires across western North America have increased in number and size over the past three decades, and this trend will continue in response to further warming. As a consequence, the wildland–urban interface is projected to experience substantially higher risk of climate-driven fires in the coming decades. Although many plants, animals, and ecosystem services benefit from fire, it is unknown how ecosystems will respond to increased burning and warming. Policy and management have focused primarily on specified resilience approaches aimed at resistance ...

 

Cross-scale Drivers of Natural Disturbances Prone to Anthropogenic Amplification: The Dynamics of Bark Beetle Eruptions

  
BioScience, Vol. 58, No. 6. (01 June 2008), pp. 501-517, https://doi.org/10.1641/b580607

Abstract

Biome-scale disturbances by eruptive herbivores provide valuable insights into species interactions, ecosystem function, and impacts of global change. We present a conceptual framework using one system as a model, emphasizing interactions across levels of biological hierarchy and spatiotemporal scales. Bark beetles are major natural disturbance agents in western North American forests. However, recent bark beetle population eruptions have exceeded the frequencies, impacts, and ranges documented during the previous 125 years. Extensive host abundance and susceptibility, concentrated beetle density, favorable weather, optimal ...

 

Managing forests and fire in changing climates

  
Science, Vol. 342, No. 6154. (04 October 2013), pp. 41-42, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1240294

Abstract

With projected climate change, we expect to face much more forest fire in the coming decades. Policy-makers are challenged not to categorize all fires as destructive to ecosystems simply because they have long flame lengths and kill most of the trees within the fire boundary. Ecological context matters: In some ecosystems, high-severity regimes are appropriate, but climate change may modify these fire regimes and ecosystems as well. Some undesirable impacts may be avoided or reduced through global strategies, as well as ...

 

Landscape ecology: what is the state of the science?

  
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Vol. 36, No. 1. (2005), pp. 319-344, https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.36.102003.152614

Abstract

Landscape ecology focuses on the reciprocal interactions between spatial pattern and ecological processes, and it is well integrated with ecology. The field has grown rapidly over the past 15 years. The persistent influence of land-use history and natural disturbance on contemporary ecosystems has become apparent. Development of pattern metrics has largely stabilized, and they are widely used to relate landscape pattern to ecological responses. Analyses conducted at multiple scales have demonstrated the importance of landscape pattern for many taxa, and spatially ...

 

Disturbance and landscape dynamics in a changing world

  
Ecology, Vol. 91, No. 10. (October 2010), pp. 2833-2849, https://doi.org/10.1890/10-0097.1

Abstract

Disturbance regimes are changing rapidly, and the consequences of such changes for ecosystems and linked social-ecological systems will be profound. This paper synthesizes current understanding of disturbance with an emphasis on fundamental contributions to contemporary landscape and ecosystem ecology, then identifies future research priorities. Studies of disturbance led to insights about heterogeneity, scale, and thresholds in space and time and catalyzed new paradigms in ecology. Because they create vegetation patterns, disturbances also establish spatial patterns of many ecosystem processes on the ...

 

Predicting across scales: theory development and testing

  
Landscape Ecology, Vol. 3, No. 3. (1 December 1989), pp. 245-252, https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00131542

Abstract

Landscape ecologists deal with processes that occur at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. The ability to make predictions at more than one level of resolution requires identification of the processes of interest and parameters that affect this process at different scales, the development of rules to translate information across scales, and the ability to test these predictions at the relevant spatial and temporal scales. This paper synthesizes discussions from a workshop on ‘Predicting Across Scales: Theory Development and Testing’ ...

This page of the database may be cited as:
Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/author/Turner:MG

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.