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Selection: Pautasso:M [10 articles] 

Publications by author Pautasso:M.
 

Pest categorisation of Pseudocercospora pini-densiflorae

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 11. (November 2017), e05029, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5029

Abstract

Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Plant Health (PLH) Panel performed a pest categorisation of Pseudocercospora pini-densiflorae, a well-defined and distinguishable fungal species of the family Mycosphaerellaceae. The regulated harmful organism is the anamorph Cercoseptoria pini-densiflorae (synonym Cercospora pini-densiflorae) with the corresponding teleomorph Mycosphaerella gibsonii. P. pini-densiflorae causes a needle blight of Pinus spp. also known as Cercospora blight of pines or Cercospora needle blight. P. pini-densiflorae is reported from sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America, Asia and ...

References

  1. Anon, 2015. PM 7/46 (3) Lecanosticta acicola (formerly Mycosphaerella dearnessii), Dothistroma septosporum (formerly Mycosphaerella pini) and Dothistroma pini. EPPO Bulletin 45, 163–182.
  2. Bossard, M., Feranec, J., Otahel, J., 2000. CORINE land cover technical guide - addendum 2000. Tech. Rep. 40, European Environment Agency. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/032TFUPGVR .
  3. Büttner, G., Kosztra, B., Maucha, G., Pataki, R., 2012. Implementation and achievements of CLC2006. Tech. rep., European Environment Agency. http://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/GQ4JECM8TB .
 

Pest categorisation of Gremmeniella abietina

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 15, No. 11. (November 2017), e05030, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5030

Abstract

Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Plant Health (PLH) Panel performed a pest categorisation of Gremmeniella abietina, a well-defined species and distinguishable fungus of the family Godroniaceae. The species G. abietina includes several varieties, races and biotypes that are found in different geographical locations, on different hosts and that vary in aggressiveness. The pathogen causes diseases on Pinus species and other conifers such as Abies spp., Picea spp., Larix spp. and Pseudotsuga spp. known as Scleroderris canker in ...

References

  1. Ahlqvist, B., Karlman, M., Witzell, J., 1996. Gremmeniella-infected Pinus contorta as raw material in the production of kraft pulp. European Journal of Forest Pathology 26, 113–121.
  2. Anon, 2009. PM 7/92(1): Gremmeniella abietina. EPPO Bulletin 39, 310–317.
  3. Barbeito, I., Brücker, R., Rixen, C., Bebi, P., 2013. Snow fungi-induced mortality of Pinus cembra at the alpine treeline: evidence from plantations. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research 45, 455–470.
  4. Bernhold, A., Witzell,
 

Resilience as a universal criterion of health

  
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 95, No. 3. (1 February 2015), pp. 455-465, https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.6539

Abstract

To promote and maintain health in agricultural and food systems, appropriate criteria are needed for the description and assessment of the health of soils, plants, animals, humans and ecosystems. Here we identify the concept of resilience as a universally applicable and fundamentally important criterion of health in all relevant areas of agriculture. We discuss definitions of resilience for soils, plants, animals, humans and ecosystems, and explore ways in which resilience can be applied as a criterion of health in different agricultural ...

 

The EFSA assessment of Trichilogaster acaciaelongifoliae as biocontrol agent of the invasive alien plant Acacia longifolia: a new area of activity for the EFSA Plant Health Panel?

  
EPPO Bulletin, Vol. 46, No. 2. (August 2016), pp. 270-274, https://doi.org/10.1111/epp.12306

Abstract

[Excerpt: Introduction] Since its foundation in 2002, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has provided independent scientific advice to European decision-makers (the European Commission, European Parliament and Member States) on the protection of consumers against threats to the food chain, animal health and plant health. In 2006, recognizing the protection of plant health to be an essential factor in the security of the food chain, the EFSA Scientific Panel on Plant Health (PLH Panel) was established. [\n] The PLH Panel is responsible for ...

 

Update of a database of host plants of Xylella fastidiosa: 20 November 2015

  
EFSA Journal, Vol. 14, No. 2. (1 February 2016), pp. n/a-n/a, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2016.4378

Abstract

Following a request from the European Commission, EFSA was tasked to periodically update its database of host plants of Xylella fastidiosa which was published in April 2015. An extensive literature search approach was used for updating the database in order to catch all new scientific developments published on the topic. Furthermore, the outputs of investigations conducted on host plants affected by X. fastidiosa in the Italian and French outbreaks were included. Literature screening and data extraction were performed using the Distiller ...

 

Ecological consequences of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) cultivation in Europe

  
European Journal of Forest Research In European Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 133, No. 1. (2014), pp. 13-29, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10342-013-0745-7

Abstract

Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) was first introduced to Europe from North America more than 150 years ago, was then planted on a large scale and is now the economically most important exotic tree species in European forests. This literature review summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of Douglas fir on soil chemistry, plants, arthropods and fungi. Douglas fir shapes its abiotic environment similarly to native tree species such as Norway spruce, silver fir or European beech. In general, many ...

 

European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) dieback - A conservation biology challenge

  
Biological Conservation, Vol. 158 (February 2013), pp. 37-49, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2012.08.026

Abstract

[Abstract] Common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is a keystone tree species throughout temperate Europe whose future existence is threatened by an emerging invasive fungal disease. Ash dieback, which first appeared in Poland in the 1990s, has rapidly spread to most eastern, central and northern European countries. The causal agent of the disease, the ascomycete Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus (anamorph Chalara fraxinea), was recently described as a new species. Given that the disease lethally affects ash trees of all age classes, and that ash tree ...

 

Focusing on publication quality would benefit all researchers

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 28, No. 6. (June 2013), pp. 318-320, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2013.03.004

Abstract

Highlights [::] Would focusing on publication quality favour female ecologists? [::] There is no difference between female versus male ecologists in the positive correlation between total (or average) number of citations and number of publications. [::] Thus, focusing on publication quality would benefit both female and male researchers. [::] To fix the still leaky pipeline in ecology, more radical action is needed. ...

 

Emerging plant diseases:combining genotypic and phenotypicdata to improve our predictions ofinvasive pathogens

  
In EFSA's 16th Scientific Colloquium on emerging risks in plant health: from plant pest interactions to global change (09 June 2011)

Abstract

While technological advances currently allow to genotype pathogen strains relatively easily, the connection between genotype (the unit of genetic inheritance) and phenotype (the unit upon which selection operates) is complicated by the fact that genetic, environmental, and epigenetic factors are all important contributing factors in phenotype determination. However, the genetic structure of a potentially invasive species can help in at least assessing the complete range of risks it may pose and in determining appropriate precautions that should be taken to ensure ...

 

Plant health and global change - some implications for landscape management

  
Biological Reviews, Vol. 85, No. 4. (2010), pp. 729-755, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-185x.2010.00123.x

Abstract

Global change (climate change together with other worldwide anthropogenic processes such as increasing trade, air pollution and urbanization) will affect plant health at the genetic, individual, population and landscape level. Direct effects include ecosystem stress due to natural resources shortage or imbalance. Indirect effects include (i) an increased frequency of natural detrimental phenomena, (ii) an increased pressure due to already present pests and diseases, (iii) the introduction of new invasive species either as a result of an improved suitability of the ...

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Integrated Natural Resources Modelling and Management - Meta-information Database. http://mfkp.org/INRMM/author/Pautasso:M

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