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Selection: Laughlin:DC [3 articles] 

Publications by author Laughlin:DC.
 

Shifts in community-level traits and functional diversity in a mixed conifer forest: a legacy of land-use change

  
Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 53, No. 6. (December 2016), pp. 1755-1765, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12737

Abstract

[Summary] [::1] Historical reference conditions have long been used to guide the restoration of degraded ecosystems. However, a rapidly changing climate and altered disturbance regimes are calling into question the usefulness of this approach. As a consequence, restoration goals are increasingly focused on creating communities that are resilient to novel environmental stressors and emphasis is being placed on defining functional targets through the use of plant traits. While changes in forest structure and composition have received much attention, long-term changes in stand-level ...

 

Fitness of multidimensional phenotypes in dynamic adaptive landscapes

  
Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 30, No. 8. (August 2015), pp. 487-496, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.06.003

Abstract

[Highlights] [::] Integrating fitness into community ecology will improve trait-based predictions. [::] Dynamic adaptive landscapes link phenotypes to fitness across environments. [::] Fitness is a function of multidimensional phenotype–environment interactions. [::] Intraspecific trait covariation constrains environmental niche breadth. [Abstract] Phenotypic traits influence species distributions, but ecology lacks established links between multidimensional phenotypes and fitness for predicting species responses to environmental change. The common focus on single traits rather than multiple trait combinations limits our understanding of their adaptive value, and intraspecific trait covariation has been neglected in ...

 

Plant functional traits have globally consistent effects on competition

  
Nature, Vol. 529, No. 7585. (14 January 2016), pp. 204-207, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16476

Abstract

[Headlines] Data from millions of trees in thousands of locations are used to show that certain key traits affect competitive ability in predictable ways, and that there are trade-offs between traits that favour growth with and without competition. [Abstract] Phenotypic traits and their associated trade-offs have been shown to have globally consistent effects on individual plant physiological functions, but how these effects scale up to influence competition, a key driver of community assembly in terrestrial vegetation, has remained unclear. Here we use growth data ...

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