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Selection: Larigauderie:A [6 articles] 

Publications by author Larigauderie:A.
 

Assessing nature's contributions to people

  
Science, Vol. 359, No. 6373. (18 January 2018), pp. 270-272, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aap8826

Abstract

A major challenge today and into the future is to maintain or enhance beneficial contributions of nature to a good quality of life for all people. This is among the key motivations of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), a joint global effort by governments, academia, and civil society to assess and promote knowledge of Earth's biodiversity and ecosystems and their contribution to human societies in order to inform policy formulation. One of the more recent key ...

 

Biodiversity loss and its impact on humanity

  
Nature, Vol. 486, No. 7401. (6 June 2012), pp. 59-67, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature11148

Abstract

The most unique feature of Earth is the existence of life, and the most extraordinary feature of life is its diversity. Approximately 9 million types of plants, animals, protists and fungi inhabit the Earth. So, too, do 7 billion people. Two decades ago, at the first Earth Summit, the vast majority of the world’s nations declared that human actions were dismantling the Earth’s ecosystems, eliminating genes, species and biological traits at an alarming rate. This observation led to the question of ...

 

Biodiversity, climate change, and ecosystem services

  
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 1, No. 1. (October 2009), pp. 46-54, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2009.07.006

Abstract

The capacity of ecosystems to deliver essential services to society is already under stress. The additional stresses imposed by climate change in the coming years will require extraordinary adaptation. We need to track the changing status of ecosystems, deepen our understanding of the biological underpinnings for ecosystem service delivery and develop new tools and techniques for maintaining and restoring resilient biological and social systems. We will be building on an ecosystem foundation that has been radically compromised during the past half ...

 

Evolution of natural and social science interactions in global change research programs

  
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110 (7 January 2013), pp. 3665-3672, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1107484110

Abstract

Efforts to develop a global understanding of the functioning of the Earth as a system began in the mid-1980s. This effort necessitated linking knowledge from both the physical and biological realms. A motivation for this development was the growing impact of humans on the Earth system and need to provide solutions, but the study of the social drivers and their consequences for the changes that were occurring was not incorporated into the Earth System Science movement, despite early attempts to do ...

 

The biodiversity and ecosystem services science-policy interface

  
Science, Vol. 331, No. 6021. (04 March 2011), pp. 1139-1140, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1202400

Abstract

In recognition of our inability to halt damaging ecosystem change, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) was asked in December 2010 to convene a meeting “to determine modalities and institutional arrangements” of a new assessment body, akin to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to track causes and consequences of anthropogenic ecosystem change (5). The “blueprint” for this body, the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), lies in recommendations of an intergovernmental conference held in the Republic of ...

 

Toward a global biodiversity observing system

  
Science, Vol. 321, No. 5892. (22 August 2008), pp. 1044-1045, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1162055

Abstract

Biodiversity is a composite term used to embrace the variety of types, forms, spatial arrangements, processes, and interactions of biological systems at all scales and levels of organization, from genes to species and ecosystems, along with the evolutionary history that led to their existence. In part because of this complexity, universally applicable measures of biodiversity have proven elusive. Commonly used measures, such as the number of species present, are strongly scale-dependent and only reveal a change after species have been lost. ...

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