From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search


Pest categorisation of Bretziella fagacearum

Claude Bragard, David Caffier, Thierry Candresse, Elisavet Chatzivassiliou, Katharina Dehnen‐Schmutz, Gianni Gilioli, Jean‐Claude Grégoire, Josep A. Jaques Miret, Michael Jeger, Alan MacLeod, Maria Navajas Navarro, Björn Niere, Stephen Parnell, Roel Potting, Trond Rafoss, Vittorio Rossi, Gregor Urek, Ariena Van Bruggen, Wopke Van der Werf, Jonathan West, Stephan Winter

Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Plant Health (PLH) Panel performed a pest categorisation of Bretziella fagacearum, a well-defined and distinguishable fungal species of the family Ceratocystidaceae. The species was moved from the genus Ceratocystis to a new genus Bretziella following phylogenetic analysis of the species and its close relatives. The former species name Ceratocystis fagacearum is used in the Council Directive 2000/29/EC. The pathogen is regulated in Annex IAI as a harmful organism whose introduction into the EU is banned. B. fagacearum is only reported from the USA, where it causes a wilt disease on Quercus spp. Other hosts are reported based on inoculation trials, although Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) is reported to be naturally infected. No North American oak species has been found to be immune to the disease. The European oak species Quercus robur, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens were found to be susceptible in inoculation experiments. The pest could enter the EU via wood (with and without bark, including wood packaging material), plants for planting and cut branches. Hosts and favourable climatic conditions are common in the EU, thus facilitating establishment. The pest would be able to spread following establishment by means of root grafts, insect vectors and movement of wood, plants for planting and other means. The pest introduction would have impacts in woodland and plantations, as oak wilt disease is often lethal in a short period of time. Wood treatment (debarking, kiln drying, fumigation), prompt removal of affected trees and creating root-free zones between affected and healthy stands are available control measures. The main knowledge gaps concern (i) the survival of the fungus in wood during transport and the association with propagation material, (ii) the presence of suitable vectors in Europe and (iii) the relative susceptibility of the oak species native to Europe under natural conditions. The criteria assessed by the Panel for consideration as a potential quarantine pest are met. For regulated non-quarantine pests, the criterion on the pest presence in the EU is not met.

Excerpt (Disclaimer)

Disclaimer

The following text is a small excerpt from the original publication. Within the general INRMM-MiD goal of indexing useful meta-information on INRMM related publications, this excerpt is intended as a handy summary of some potentially interesting aspects of the publication. However, the excerpt is surely incomplete and some key aspects may be missing or their correct interpretation may require the full publication to be carefully read. Please, refer to the full publication for any detail.

OK


Conclusions. [...]
Identity of the pest ▹ The identity of the pest as a species is clear.
[...]
The recent change in name from Ceratocystis fagacearum to Bretziella fagacearum may take time for acceptance by the scientific community. [...]
Absence/presence of the pest in the EU territory ▹ The pest is not reported to be present in the EU
[...]
There are no records from EU MSs available to the Panel of the absence of the pathogen other than from Lithuania, the Netherlands and Slovenia [...]
Regulatory status ▹ B. fagacearum is regulated by Council Directive 2000/29/EC (Annex IAI, as Ceratocystis fagacearum) as a harmful organism whose introduction into and spread within all Member States shall be banned.
[...]
Pest potential for entry, establishment and spread in the EU territory ▹ Entry: the pest could enter the EU via wood (with and without bark), isolated bark, plants for planting and cut branches.
Establishment: hosts and favourable climatic conditions are widespread in the risk assessment (RA) area.
Spread: the pest would be able to spread following establishment by various means, i.e. insects, root grafts and movement of infected wood and plants for planting.
[...]
There is uncertainty about the survival of the fungus in wood during transport and the association with propagation material.
A knowledge gap is the presence of suitable vectors in Europe.
There is a lack of knowledge on mycelial mat formation in European oak species affecting the spread.
It is not known to what extent the limited (compared to the USA) distribution of red oak species in Europe would restrict the spread rate of the disease. [...]
Potential for consequences in the EU territory ▹ The pest introduction would have economic and environmental impacts in woodlands and plantations.
[...]
There is uncertainty about the relative susceptibility level under natural conditions in European locations of the various oak species native to Europe. [...]
Available measures ▹ Wood treatment (debarking, kiln drying, fumigation), prompt removal of affected trees and creating root-free zones between affected and healthy stands are available measures to reduce the risk of entry, establishment and spread.
[...]
Production of plants for planting in pest-free areas can prevent pest presence on plants for planting.
[...]
It is uncertain how effective chemical control in nurseries could be and whether it might just mask symptoms, hence allowing the movement of the pathogen via the trade in plants for planting.
The effectiveness of debarking as wood treatment is uncertain, given that B. fagacearum can be isolated from sawn lumber up to 24 weeks after sawing. [...]
Conclusion on pest categorisation ▹ The criteria assessed by the Panel for consideration as a potential quarantine pest are met.
[...]
The criterion on the pest presence in the EU is not met. [...]
Aspects of assessment to focus on/scenarios to address in future if appropriate ▹ The main knowledge gaps concern (i) the survival of the fungus in wood (with and without bark) during transport and the association with propagation material, (ii) the presence of suitable vectors in Europe and (iii) the relative susceptibility level under natural conditions in European locations of the oak species native to Europe. [...]


EFSA Journal, Vol. 16, No. 2. (February 2018), e05185, https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2018.5185 
Key: INRMM:14539269

Keywords

                       


Article-Level Metrics (Altmetrics)
Digital Object Identifier


Available versions (may include free-access full text)

DOI, Pubget, PubMed (Search)

Further search for available versions

Search in ResearchGate (or try with a fuzzier search in ResearchGate)
Search in Mendeley (or try with a fuzzier search in Mendeley)

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core
Metadata search: CrossRef DOI, DataCite DOI

Digital preservation of this INRMM-MiD record

Internet Archive

References

  1. Ambourn, A.K., Juzwik, J., Moon, R.D., 2005. Seasonal dispersal of the oak wilt fungus by Colopterus truncatus and Carpophilus sayi in Minnesota. Plant Disease 89, 1067–1076.
  2. Appel, D.N., 1995. The oak wilt enigma: perspectives from the Texas epidemic. Annual Review of Phytopathology 33, 103–118.
  3. Appel, D.N., Maggio, R.C., Nelson, E.L., Jeger, M.J., 1989. Measurement of expanding oak wilt centers in live oak. Phytopathology 79, 1318–1322.
  4. Baker, R., Candresse, T., Dormannsné Simon, E., Gilioli, G., Grégoire, J.-C., Jeger, M. J., Karadjova, O. E., Lövei, G., Makowski, D., Manceau, C., Navajas, M., Porta Puglia, A., Rafoss, T., Rossi, V., Schans, J., Schrader, G., Urek, G., van Lenteren, J. C., Vloutoglou, I., Winter, S., Zlotina, M., 2010. Guidance on a harmonised framework for pest risk assessment and the identification and evaluation of pest risk management options by EFSA. EFSA Journal 8 (2), 1495+. https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2010.1495 ,   INRMM-MiD: 14506336 .
  5. Bossard, M., Feranec, J., Otahel, J., 2000. CORINE land cover technical guide - Addendum 2000. Tech. Rep. 40, European Environment Agency. https://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/032TFUPGVR .
  6. Boyraz, N., Bastas, K.K., 2001. A new fungal disease on oaks of Turkey: oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum (Bretz) Hunt = Chalara quercina) first report. Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Selçuk Üniversitesi 15, 147–152 (in Turkish).
  7. Bretz, T., Long, W.G., 1950. Oak wilt fungus isolated from Chinese chestnut. Plant Disease Reporter 34, 291.
  8. Bretz, T.W., 1951. Oak wilt. Journal of Forestry 49, 169–171.
  9. Bretz, T.W., Buchanan, W.D., 1957. Oak wilt not found in acorns from diseased tree. Plant Disease Reporter 41, 546.
  10. Bruhn, J.N., Heyd, R.L., 1992. Biology and control of oak wilt in Michigan red oak stands. Northern Journal of Applied Forestry 9, 47–51.
  11. Bruhn, J.N., Pickens, J.B., Stanfield, D.B., 1991. Probit analysis of oak wilt transmission through root grafts in red oak stands. Forest Science 37, 28–44.
  12. Buchanan, W.D., 1957. Brentids may be vectors of the oak wilt disease. Plant Disease Reporter 41, 707–708.
  13. Büttner, G., Kosztra, B., Maucha, G., Pataki, R., 2012. Implementation and achievements of CLC2006. Tech. rep., European Environment Agency. http://www.eea.europa.eu/ds_resolveuid/GQ4JECM8TB .
  14. Campbell, R.N., French, D.W., 1955. Moisture content of oaks and mat formation by the oak wilt fungus. Forest Science 1, 265–270.
  15. Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 2016. Ceratocystis fagacearum (oak wilt) - fact sheet. Canadian Food Inspection Agency. http://www.inspection.gc.ca/plants/plant-pests-invasive-species/diseases/oak-wilt/fact-sheet/eng/1325629194844/1325632464641 .
  16. Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 2017. Contingency plan for oak wilt (Ceratocystis fagacearum). Forestry Commission, UK, 35 pp. https://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/ContingencyplanoakwiltFINAL30-01-17.pdf/$FILE/ContingencyplanoakwiltFINAL30-01-17.pdf .
  17. Chirici, G., Bertini, R., Travaglini, D., Puletti, N., Chiavetta, U., 2011a. The common nfi database. In: Chirici, G., Winter, S., McRoberts, R.E. (eds.). National Forest Inventories: Contributions to Forest Biodiversity Assessments. Springer, Berlin. pp. 99–119.
  18. Chirici, G., McRoberts, R.E., Winter, S., Barbati, A., Brändli, U.-B., Abegg, M., Beranova, J., Rondeux, J., Bertini, R., Alberdi Asensio, I., Condés, S., 2011b. Harmonization tests. In: Chirici, G., Winter, S., McRoberts, R.E. (eds.). National Forest Inventories: Contributions to Forest Biodiversity Assessments. Springer, Berlin. pp. 121–190.
  19. Cummings-Carlson, J., Martin, A.J., 2001. Oak wilt management: what are the options?. University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, Cooperative Extension Publications G3590, 6 pp.
  20. de Beer, Z.W., Marincowitz, S., Duong, T.A., Wingfield, M.J., 2017. Bretziella, a new genus to accommodate the oak wilt fungus, Ceratocystis fagacearum (Microascales, Ascomycota). MycoKeys 27, 1–19.
  21. de Jong, Y., Verbeek, M., Michelsen, V., Bjørn Pde, P., Los, W., Steeman, F., Bailly, N., Basire, C., Chylarecki, P., Stloukal, E., Hagedorn, G., Hagedorn, G., Wetzel, F.T., Glöckler, F., Kroupa, A., Korb, G., Hoffmann, A., Häuser, C., Kohlbecker, A., Müller, A., Güntsch, A., Stoev, P., Penev, L., 2014. Fauna Europaea - all European animal species on the web. Biodiversity Data Journal 2, e4034.
  22. de Rigo, D., 2012. Semantic Array Programming for environmental modelling: application of the Mastrave library. In: Seppelt, R., Voinov, A.A., Lange, S., Bankamp, D. (Eds.). International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs) 2012. International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software - Managing Resources of a Limited Planet: Pathways and Visions under Uncertainty, Sixth Biennial Meeting. pp. 1167–1176.
  23. de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., Busetto, L., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., 2014. Supporting EFSA assessment of the EU environmental suitability for exotic forestry pests: final report. EFSA Supporting Publications 11(3), EN-434+. https://doi.org/10.2903/sp.efsa.2014.en-434 ,   INRMM-MiD: 13114000.
  24. de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., Houston Durrant, T., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., 2016. The European Atlas of Forest Tree Species: modelling, data and information on forest tree species. In: San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., Houston Durrant, T., Mauri, A. (eds.). European Atlas of Forest Tree Species. Publication Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, pp. e01aa69+, https://w3id.org/mtv/FISE-Comm/v01/e01aa69 .
  25. de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., Barredo, J.I., 2017. Robust modelling of the impacts of climate change on the habitat suitability of forest tree species. Publication Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 58 pp. ISBN:978-92-79-66704-6, https://doi.org/10.2760/296501 ,   INRMM-MiD: 14314400.
  26. Diaz-Maroto, I.J., Vila-Lameiro, P., 2007. Natural forests of Quercus robur L. in Northwest Spain - main properties of soils. Polish Journal of Ecology 55, 401–404.
  27. Ducci, F. (ed.)., 2007. Le risorse genetiche della farnia della Val Padana - tutela e gestione. Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Arezzo, Italy. p. 73.
  28. EPPO (European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization), 1997. Data sheets on quarantine pests: Ceratocystis fagacearum. In: Smith, I.M., McNamara, D.G., Scott, P.R., Holderness, M. (eds.). Quarantine Pests for Europe, 2nd ed. CABI/EPPO, Wallingford, 1425 pp.
  29. EPPO (European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization), 2001. Diagnostic protocols for regulated pests: Ceratocystis fagacearum. EPPO Bulletin 31, 41–44.
  30. EPPO (European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization), 2017. EPPO Global Database . https://gd.eppo.int .
  31. Eggers, J., Juzwik, J., Bernick, S., Mordaunt, L., 2005. Evaluation of propiconazole operational treatments of oaks for wilt control. Research Note NC-390 of the USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station, St. Paul, USA, 6 pp.
  32. Eschen, R., Douma, J.C., Grégoire, J.C., Mayer, F., Rigaux, L., Potting, R.P., 2017. A risk categorisation and analysis of the geographic and temporal dynamics of the European import of plants for planting. Biological Invasions 19, 3243–3257.
  33. FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations), 2004. ISPM (International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures) 21—Pest risk analysis of regulated non-quarantine pests. FAO, Rome, 30 pp. https://www.ippc.int/sites/default/files/documents//1323945746_ISPM_21_2004_En_2011-11-29_Refor.pdf .
  34. FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations), 2013. ISPM (International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures) 11—Pest risk analysis for quarantine pests. FAO, Rome, 36 pp. https://www.ippc.int/sites/default/files/documents/20140512/ispm_11_2013_en_2014-04-30_201405121523-494.65%20KB.pdf .
  35. French, D.W., Juzwik, J., 1999. Oak wilt in Minnesota. University of Minnesota, Extension Service, St. Paul, USA. p. 4.
  36. Gehring, E.H., 1995. Evaluation of suppression project treatments. In: Appel, D.N., Billings, R.F. (eds.). Oak Wilt Perspectives: The Proceedings of the National Oak Wilt Symposium, 1992. Houston, Texas, USA, pp. 147-154.
  37. Gibbs, J.N., French, D.W., 1980. The transmission of oak wilt. Research Paper NC-185, North Central Forest Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, USA, 22 pp. https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/10706 .
  38. Gibbs, J.N., Liese, W., Pinon, J., 1984. Oak wilt for Europe. Outlook on Agriculture 13, 203–207.
  39. Gleason, M., Mueller, D., 2005. Oak wilt - identification and management. Iowa State University, University Extension, Ames, USA, 8pp.
  40. Greene, T.A., Reemts, C.M., 2009. Oak wilt research at Fort Hood: inoculum sources at landscape scale. In: Appel, D.N., Billings, R.F. (eds.). Proceedings of the 2nd National Oak Wilt Symposium 2007. USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Austin, Texas, USA, pp. 86–107.
  41. Harrington, T.C., 2009. The genus Ceratocystis. Where does the oak wilt fungus fit. In: Appel, D.N., Billings, R.F. (eds.). Proceedings of the 2nd National Oak Wilt Symposium 2007. USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Austin, USA, pp. 21–35.
  42. Harrington, T.C., 2013. Ceratocystis diseases. In: Gonthier, P., Nicolotti, G. (eds.). Infectious Forest Diseases. CAB International, Wallingford, UK. pp. 230–255.
  43. Haugen, L., O'Brien, J., Pokorny, J., Mielke, M., Juzwik, J., 2009. Oak wilt in the North Central region. In: Appel, D.N., Billings, R.F. (eds.). Proceedings of the 2nd National Oak Wilt Symposium 2007. USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Austin, USA, pp. 155-163.
  44. Hepting, G.H., Toole, E.R., Boyce, J.S., 1952. Sexuality in the oak wilt fungus. Phytopathology 42, 438–442.
  45. Hiederer, R., Houston Durrant, T., Granke, O., Lambotte, M., Lorenz, M., Mignon, B., Mues, V., 2007. Forest focus monitoring database system - validation methodology. Vol. EUR 23020 EN of EUR – Scientific and Technical Research. Office for Official Publications of the European Communities. https://doi.org/10.2788/51364 .
  46. Hiederer, R., Houston Durrant, T., Micheli, E., 2011. Evaluation of BioSoil demonstration project - Soil data analysis. Vol. 24729 of EUR - Scientific and Technical Research. Publications Office of the European Union. https://doi.org/10.2788/56105 .
  47. Houston Durrant, T., Hiederer, R., 2009. Applying quality assurance procedures to environmental monitoring data: a case study. Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11, 774–781.
  48. Houston Durrant, T., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., Schulte, E., Suarez Meyer, A., 2011. Evaluation of BioSoil demonstration project: forest biodiversity - Analysis of biodiversity module. Vol. 24777 of EUR – Scientific and Technical Research. Publications Office of the European Union. https://doi.org/10.2788/84823 .
  49. Houston, D.R., 1993. Recognizing and managing sapstreak disease of sugar maple. USDA, Forest Service. Research Paper NE-675. North-eastern Forest Experiment Station, Radnor, Pennsylvania, USA. 15 pp.
  50. Jones, T.W., 1971. An appraisal of oak wilt control programs in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper NE-204, North-Eastern Forest Experiment Station, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, USA, 18 pp.
  51. Juzwik, J., 2009. Epidemiology and occurrence of oak wilt in Midwestern, middle, and south Atlantic states. In: Appel, D.N., Billings, R.F. (eds.). Proceedings of the National Oak Wilt Symposium, 2007. USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Austin, USA, pp. 49-60.
  52. Juzwik, J., Appel, D.N., MacDonald, W.L., Burks, S., 2011. Challenges and successes in managing oak wilt in the United States. Plant Disease 95, 888–900.
  53. Juzwik, J., French, D.W., 1983. Ceratocystis fagacearum and C. piceae on the surfaces of free-flying and fungus-mat-inhabiting nitidulids. Phytopathology 73, 1164–1168.
  54. Juzwik, J., Harrington, T.C., MacDonald, W.L., Appel, D.N., 2008. The origin of Ceratocystis fagacearum, the oak wilt fungus. Annual Review of Phytopathology 46, 13–26.
  55. Koch, K.A., Quiram, G.L., Venette, R.C., 2010. A review of oak wilt management: a summary of treatment options and their efficacy. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 9, 1–8.
  56. Lamarche, J., Potvin, A., Pelletier, G., Stewart, D., Feau, N., Alayon, D.I., Dale, A.L., Coelho, A., Uzunovic, A., Bilodeau, G.J., Brière, S.C., 2015. Molecular detection of 10 of the most unwanted alien forest pathogens in Canada using real-time PCR. PLoS ONE 10, e0134265.
  57. MacDonald, W.L., Pinon, J., Tainter, F.H., Double, M.L., 2001. European oaks – susceptible to oak wilt? In: Ash, C.L. (ed). Shade Tree Wilt Diseases. APS Press, St Paul, USA. pp. 131–137.
  58. McCracken, F.I., Burkhardt, E.C., 1979. Limiting canker disease losses of sycamore in the mid-south. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry 3, 26–28.
  59. Mielke, M.E., Haynes, C., Rexrode, C.O., 1983. Local spread of oak wilt in north-eastern West Virginia during 1970-1982. Plant Disease 67, 1222–1223.
  60. Miller, R.B., Quirk, J.T., Christensen, D.J., 1985. Identifying white oak logs with sodium nitrite. Forest Products Journal 35, 33–38.
  61. Moricca, S., Bracalini, M., Croci, F., Corsinovi, S., Tiberi, R., Ragazzi, A., Panzavolta, T., 2018. Biotic factors affecting ecosystem services in urban and peri-urban Forests in Italy: the role of introduced and impending pathogens and pests. Forests 9, 65.
  62. Osterbauer, N.K., Salisbury, T., French, D.W., 1994. Propiconazole as a treatment for oak wilt in Quercus alba and Q. macrocarpa. Journal of Arboriculture 20, 202–203.
  63. Peel, M.C., Finlayson, B.L., McMahon, T.A., 2007. Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 11, 1633–1644. https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-11-1633-2007 ,   INRMM-MiD: 8144782.
  64. Pinon, J., Irwin, H., MacDonald, W., Tainter, H., 1997. The susceptibility of European oaks to oak wilt. Phytopathology 87, S114.
  65. Rexrode, C.O., Brown, D., 1983. Oak wilt. Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 29, USDA, Forest Service. https://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/oakwilt/oakwilt.htm .
  66. Robinet, C., Douma, J.C., Piou, D., van der Werf, W., 2016. Application of a wood pathway model to assess the effectiveness of options for reducing risk of entry of oak wilt into Europe. Forestry 89, 456–472.
  67. Sakalidis, M.L., Bhakta, B., Bohlng, M., 2017. National Invasive Species Awareness Week: Oak wilt. Michigan State University. http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/ national_invasive_species_awareness_week_oak_wilt_msg17_bohling17 .
  68. San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., 2016. The European union forest strategy and the forest information system for Europe. In: San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., Houston Durrant, T., Mauri, A. (eds.). European Atlas of Forest Tree Species. Publication Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, pp. e012228+ .
  69. San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., de Rigo, D., Caudullo, G., Houston Durrant, T., Mauri, A. (eds.), 2016. European Atlas of Forest Tree Species. Publication Office of the European Union, Luxembourg. ISBN: 978-92-79-36740-3, https://doi.org/10.2788/4251 , https://w3id.org/mtv/FISE-Comm/v01/ .
  70. Sinclair, W.A., Lyon, H.H., 2005. Diseases of Trees and Shrubs, 2nd Edition. Comstock Publishing Associates, a division of Cornell University Press, Ithaca, USA. 660 pp.
  71. True, R.P., Barnett, H.L., Dorsey, C.K., Leach, J.G., 1960. Oak wilt in West Virginia. West Virginia Agricultural Experimental Station Bulletin 448T, West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
  72. Webber, J., 2015. Rapid pest risk analysis (PRA) for Ceratocystis fagacearum. Forest Research, Alice Holt, UK, 23 pp. https://secure.fera.defra.gov.uk/phiw/riskRegister/ downloadExternalPra.cfm?id=4097 .
  73. Wingfield, M.J., Barnes, I., de Beer, Z.W., Roux, J., Wingfield, B.D., Taerum, S.J., 2017. Novel associations between ophiostomatoid fungi, insects and tree hosts: current status—future prospects. Biological Invasions 19, 3215–3228. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1468-3 .
  74. Wu, C.P., Chen, G.Y., Li, B., Su, H., An, Y.L., Zhen, S.Z., Ye, J.R., 2011. Rapid and accurate detection of Ceratocystis fagacearum from stained wood and soil by nested and real-time PCR. Forest Pathology 41, 15–21. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0329.2009.00628.x .


Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.