From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search


Temperature lapse rate in complex mountain terrain on the southern slope of the central Himalayas

D. B. Kattel, T. Yao, K. Yang, L. Tian, G. Yang, D. Joswiak

This study presents the first results of monthly, seasonal and annual characteristics of temperature lapse rate on the southern slope of the central Himalayas, based on 20 years record of surface air temperature at 56 stations in Nepal. These stations are located at a range of elevations between 72 and 3,920 m above sea level. It is proven that the lapse rate can be calculated with a linear regression model. The annual cycle of temperature lapse rate exhibits a bi-modal pattern: two maxima in the pre- and post-monsoon seasons respectively separated by two minima in winter and summer, respectively. This pattern is different from the findings from the other mountain regions and suggests different controlling factors in the individual seasons. The highest temperature lapse rate occurs in the pre-monsoon and is associated with strong dry convection (i.e., corresponding to the clear weather season and considerable sensible heat flux). The post-monsoon has the second highest lapse rate, and its cause is similar to the pre-monsoon season but with a relatively small thermal forcing effect after the rainy summer. The lowest lapse rate occurs in winter and is associated with strong radiative cooling and cold air flows over low-elevation areas. The summer lapse rate minimum is due to latent heating over the higher elevations and reduced solar heating over the lower elevations.


Theoretical and Applied Climatology, Vol. 113, No. 3-4. (2013), pp. 671-682, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-012-0816-6 
Key: INRMM:14527483

Keywords

               

Article-Level Metrics (Altmetrics)
Digital Object Identifier


Available versions (may include free-access full text)

DOI, SpringerLink, Pubget, PubMed (Search)

Versions of the publication are also available in Google Scholar.
Google Scholar code: GScluster:8695025900737896378

Works citing this publication (including grey literature)

An updated list of who cited this publication is available in Google Scholar.
Google Scholar code: GScites:8695025900737896378

Further search for available versions

Search in ResearchGate (or try with a fuzzier search in ResearchGate)
Search in Mendeley (or try with a fuzzier search in Mendeley)

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core
Metadata search: CrossRef DOI, DataCite DOI

Digital preservation of this INRMM-MiD record

Internet Archive

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.