From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search


Regular patterns link individual behavior to population persistence

Frederic Guichard



Excerpt (Disclaimer)

Disclaimer

The following text is a small excerpt from the original publication. Within the general INRMM-MiD goal of indexing useful meta-information on INRMM related publications, this excerpt is intended as a handy summary of some potentially interesting aspects of the publication. However, the excerpt is surely incomplete and some key aspects may be missing or their correct interpretation may require the full publication to be carefully read. Please, refer to the full publication for any detail.

OK


Resisting and recovering from disturbances is a necessity for most species. The strategy is sometimes collective, depending on the aggregation of interacting individuals into regular patterns. However, relating patterns of abundance across scales to both individual behavior and population persistence remains a major challenge for ecology. Such patterns are found in many ecosystems, ranging from microbes to forests, with their regularity taking the form of evenly sized and spaced bands and patches of aggregated individuals. Regular patterns are said to be self-organized when they emerge from local interactions among individuals that are a combination of positive and negative feedbacks. Positive feedbacks mean that growth and survival increase with the density of individuals. Such “safety in numbers” is found in many natural systems, including saltmarshes, arid vegetation, and mussel beds, where individuals can gain protection from physical disturbances, such as waves or erosion. However, aggregation also means competing for limited resources, which leads to negative feedbacks between density and growth. The combination of positive and negative feedbacks illustrates the “balance of nature”, and could lead to a homogeneous distribution, but their properties can produce much more complex dynamics. First, their nonlinearity means that growth and survival can show abrupt changes with small changes in density, which can prevent populations from reaching an equilibrium state. Second, most ecological interactions among individuals occur over limited spatial scales (i.e., between neighbors). When the spatial extent of positive effects is shorter than the extent of negative competitive effects, regular patterns of aggregation can emerge [...]. When it is the temporal scales of feedbacks that differ instead, self-organized patterns can emerge as a scale-free distribution of aggregated individuals [...].
[...]


Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, No. 30. (25 July 2017), pp. 7747-7749, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1709063114 
Key: INRMM:14401148

Keywords

                                     

Article-Level Metrics (Altmetrics)
Digital Object Identifier


Available versions (may include free-access full text)

DOI, HighWire, HighWire (PDF), Pubmed, Hubmed, Pubget

Versions of the publication are also available in Google Scholar.
Google Scholar code: GScluster:15456011428281764202

Works citing this publication (including grey literature)

An updated list of who cited this publication is available in Google Scholar.
Google Scholar code: GScites:15456011428281764202

Further search for available versions

Search in ResearchGate (or try with a fuzzier search in ResearchGate)
Search in Mendeley (or try with a fuzzier search in Mendeley)

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core
Metadata search: CrossRef DOI, DataCite DOI

Digital preservation of this INRMM-MiD record

Internet Archive

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.