From MFKP_wiki

Jump to: navigation, search


The lanky and the corky: fire-escape strategies in savanna woody species

Vinícius Dantas, Juli G. Pausas


Fire and herbivory are the main disturbances shaping the structure of savannas. In these ecosystems, the key strategies by which woody plants escape fire are either early height growth (the lanky strategy) or early bark growth (the corky strategy). We hypothesize that the dominance of each strategy in different savannas depends on the prevailing disturbance regimes. Given the importance of herbivory in afrotropical savanna, we expect woody plants in these savannas to be taller and have thinner barks (the lanky strategy) than plants in neotropical savanna where fire tends to be more intense (the corky strategy).
We compiled data on bark thickness and stem height in relation to stem diameter for afrotropical and neotropical savanna woody species and tested for differences in the allometric relationship between these two savannas with a general linear mixed model (GLMM).
Fire intensities were higher in neotropical than in afrotropical savannas. Afrotropical savanna plants were taller and had thinner barks for a given diameter than neotropical savanna plants – supporting our hypothesis that because of the contrasting disturbance regimes, the lanky strategy is more adaptive in afrotropical savannas, whereas the corky strategy is more adaptive in neotropical savannas.
Synthesis ▹ While the lanky strategy is more associated with heavily browsed and fuel-controlled savannas, the corky strategy is associated with lightly browsed savannas that experience more intense fires. Because the relative role of disturbances varies across the globe, we suggest that the height-bark-diameter scheme is a powerful framework for understanding the ecology of many savannas.


Journal of Ecology, Vol. 101, No. 5. (1 September 2013), pp. 1265-1272, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12118 
Key: INRMM:12603694

Keywords

             

Article-Level Metrics (Altmetrics)
Digital Object Identifier


Available versions (may include free-access full text)

DOI, Pubget, PubMed (Search)

Versions of the publication are also available in Google Scholar.
Google Scholar code: GScluster:9057275943393604987

Works citing this publication (including grey literature)

An updated list of who cited this publication is available in Google Scholar.
Google Scholar code: GScites:9057275943393604987

Further search for available versions

Search in ResearchGate (or try with a fuzzier search in ResearchGate)
Search in Mendeley (or try with a fuzzier search in Mendeley)

Publication metadata

Bibtex, RIS, RSS/XML feed, Json, Dublin Core
Metadata search: CrossRef DOI, DataCite DOI

Digital preservation of this INRMM-MiD record

Internet Archive

Meta-information Database (INRMM-MiD).
This database integrates a dedicated meta-information database in CiteULike (the CiteULike INRMM Group) with the meta-information available in Google Scholar, CrossRef and DataCite. The Altmetric database with Article-Level Metrics is also harvested. Part of the provided semantic content (machine-readable) is made even human-readable thanks to the DCMI Dublin Core viewer. Digital preservation of the meta-information indexed within the INRMM-MiD publication records is implemented thanks to the Internet Archive.
The library of INRMM related pubblications may be quickly accessed with the following links.
Search within the whole INRMM meta-information database:
Search only within the INRMM-MiD publication records:
Full-text and abstracts of the publications indexed by the INRMM meta-information database are copyrighted by the respective publishers/authors. They are subject to all applicable copyright protection. The conditions of use of each indexed publication is defined by its copyright owner. Please, be aware that the indexed meta-information entirely relies on voluntary work and constitutes a quite incomplete and not homogeneous work-in-progress.
INRMM-MiD was experimentally established by the Maieutike Research Initiative in 2008 and then improved with the help of several volunteers (with a major technical upgrade in 2011). This new integrated interface is operational since 2014.